Owyhee County, Idaho: Wikis

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Owyhee County, Idaho
Seal of Owyhee County, Idaho
Map of Idaho highlighting Owyhee County
Location in the state of Idaho
Map of the U.S. highlighting Idaho
Idaho's location in the U.S.
Seat Murphy
Largest city Homedale
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

7,697 sq mi (19,934 km²)
7,679 sq mi (19,886 km²)
19 sq mi (48 km²), 0.24%
Population
 - (2000)
 - Density

10,644
1.4/sq mi (0.5/km²)
Founded December 31, 1863
Named for lost Hawaiian trappers
Time zone Mountain: UTC-7/-6
Owyhee Mountains.jpg
Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed in the Owyhee Mountains about 50 miles southwest of Boise.
Website www.owyheecounty.net

Owyhee County is a county located in the southwestern corner of the U.S. state of Idaho. In area it is the second largest county in Idaho, behind Idaho County in the north central region of the state. As of the 2000 Census, Owyhee County had a population of 10,644 (2008 estimate: 10,877).[1] The county seat is Murphy,[2] and its largest city is Homedale.[3]

Owyhee County is part of the Boise CityNampa, Idaho Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Contents

History

On December 31, 1863, Owyhee County became the first county organized by the Idaho Territorial Legislature. In the north, Nez Perce and Idaho counties predate Owyhee County as parts of the Washington Territory, but they were not recognized by the Idaho Territory until February 1864.

Owyhee County originally included present-day Twin Falls, Cassia and Power Counties. It assumed its present boundaries in 1879.

The name Owyhee: "Owyhee" and "Hawaii" are two different spellings for the same word. When Captain James Cook discovered what he named the Sandwich Islands (known more recently as the Hawaiian Islands) in 1778, he found them inhabited by people called Owyhees. The spelling "Owyhee" is simplified a little from its original form: "Owyhee" is the spelling that British and American traders used during the early nineteenth century in referring to natives of the Sandwich Islands, and a number of Owyhees sailed on to the Columbia, where they joined trapping expeditions or worked at some of the fur trade posts.

Three of the Owyhees joined Donald MacKenzie's Snake expedition, which went out annually into the Snake country for the North West Company--a Montreal organization of Canadian fur traders. Unluckily, those three Owyhees left the main party during the winter of 1819-20; they set out to explore the then unknown terrain of what since has been called the Owyhee River and mountains, and have not been heard from since. Because of their disappearance, the British fur trappers started to call the region "Owyhee," and the name stuck."[4][5]

Owyhee County's history is inextricably linked to the mining boom that dominated Idaho in the second half of the 19th Century. Silver City and Ruby City are among the state's most noteworthy ghost towns from the period. At its height in the 1880s, Owyhee County was among the most populous places in Idaho. Today it is among the least populous, at 1.4 persons per square mile (0.5 per km²).

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 7,697 square miles (19,934 km²), of which, 7,678 square miles (19,886 km²) of it is land and 19 square miles (48 km²) of it (0.24%) is water.

Nearly all of the county is high intermountain desert, with plentiful sagebrush and basalt canyons. The Owyhee Mountains in the west dominate the landscape, with Hayden Peak reaching 8,403 feet (2561 m) above sea level. The lowest elevation is at the county's northwest corner, where the Snake River is just above 2,000 feet (610 m) at the Oregon border. The Snake forms most of the county's northern border from Oregon to just west of Glenns Ferry in Elmore County. A tributary of the Snake is the Bruneau River, which flows north from Nevada through the eastern section of the county. The Owyhee River starts in the southwestern part of the county and flows westward into Oregon; it eventually enters the Snake at the state border south of Nyssa.

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Adjacent counties

National protected areas

Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1900 3,804
1910 4,044 6.3%
1920 4,694 16.1%
1930 4,103 −12.6%
1940 5,652 37.8%
1950 6,307 11.6%
1960 6,375 1.1%
1970 6,422 0.7%
1980 8,272 28.8%
1990 8,392 1.5%
2000 10,644 26.8%
Est. 2008 10,877 2.2%
sources:[1][6]

As of the census[7] of 2000, there were 10,644 people, 3,710 households, and 2,756 families residing in the county. The population density was 1.4 person per square mile (0.5/km²). There were 4,452 housing units at an average density of 1 per square mile (0/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 76.87% White, 0.15% Black or African American, 3.21% Native American, 0.47% Asian, 0.08% Pacific Islander, 16.50% from other races, and 2.72% from two or more races. 23.10% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 14.3% were of American, 12.5% German, 10.4% English and 8.1% Irish ancestry according to Census 2000.

There were 3,710 households out of which 37.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.20% were married couples living together, 8.70% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.70% were non-families. 21.80% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.85 and the average family size was 3.35.

In the county the population was spread out with 31.90% under the age of 18, 8.50% from 18 to 24, 26.50% from 25 to 44, 20.90% from 45 to 64, and 12.10% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females there were 109.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 107.60 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $28,339, and the median income for a family was $32,856. Males had a median income of $25,146 versus $20,718 for females. The per capita income for the county was $13,405. About 14.20% of families and 16.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.80% of those under age 18 and 12.10% of those age 65 or over.

Cities

Gallery

References

Further reading

External links

Coordinates: 42°34′N 116°10′W / 42.56°N 116.17°W / 42.56; -116.17


Genealogy

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

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Owyhee County, Idaho
Seal of Owyhee County, Idaho
Map
File:Map of Idaho highlighting Owyhee County.png
Location in the state of Idaho
Map of the USA highlighting Idaho
Idaho's location in the USA
Statistics
Founded December 31, 1863
Seat Murphy
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

 sq mikm²)
 sq mi ( km²)
 sq mi ( km²), 0.24%
wikipedia:Population
 - (2000)
 - Density

10644
Website: www.owyheecounty.net

Owyhee County is a county located in the U.S. state of Idaho. In area it is the next to largest county in Idaho, second only to Idaho County. As of the 2000 Census the county had a population of 10,644 (2005 estimate: 11,073) [1]. The county seat is Murphy6. Homedale is the county's largest city.

Previous county seats were Ruby City (1863-1867) and Silver City (1867-1934).

Owyhee County is part of the Boise City-Nampa, ID Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Contents

History

On December 31, 1863, Owyhee County became the first county organized by the Idaho Territorial Legislature. Nez Perce and Idaho Counties predate Owyhee County as parts of Washington Territory, but they were not recognized by Idaho Territory until February 1864.

Owyhee County originally included present-day Twin Falls, Cassia and Power Counties. It assumed its present boundaries in 1879. "Owyhee" is a corruption of Hawaii, a reference to Hawaiian fur trappers who explored the area in 1819 and 1820.

Owyhee County's history is inextricably linked to the mining boom that dominated Idaho in the second half of the 19th Century. Silver City and Ruby City are among the state's most noteworthy ghost towns from the period. At its height in the 1880s Owyhee County was among the most populated places in Idaho. Today it is among the least populated.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 19,934 km² (7,697 sq mi). 19,886 km² (7,678 sq mi) of it is land and 48 km² (19 sq mi) of it (0.24%) is water.

Adjacent Counties

Demographics

As of the census2 of 2000, there were 10,644 people, 3,710 households, and 2,756 families residing in the county. The population density was 1/km² (1/sq mi). There were 4,452 housing units at an average density of 0/km² (1/sq mi). The racial makeup of the county was 76.87% White, 0.15% Black or African American, 3.21% Native American, 0.47% Asian, 0.08% Pacific Islander, 16.50% from other races, and 2.72% from two or more races. 23.10% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 3,710 households out of which 37.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.20% were married couples living together, 8.70% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.70% were non-families. 21.80% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.85 and the average family size was 3.35.

In the county the population was spread out with 31.90% under the age of 18, 8.50% from 18 to 24, 26.50% from 25 to 44, 20.90% from 45 to 64, and 12.10% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females there were 109.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 107.60 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $28,339, and the median income for a family was $32,856. Males had a median income of $25,146 versus $20,718 for females. The per capita income for the county was $13,405. About 14.20% of families and 16.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.80% of those under age 18 and 12.10% of those age 65 or over.

Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed in the Owyhee Mountains about 50 miles southwest of Boise.

Cities and towns

External links

Coordinates: 42°34′N 116°10′W / 42.56, -116.17

This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Owyhee County, Idaho. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
Facts about Owyhee County, IdahoRDF feed
County names Owyhee County, Idaho  +
County of country United States  +
County of subdivision1 Idaho  +
Short name Owyhee County  +

This article uses material from the "Owyhee County, Idaho" article on the Genealogy wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

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