The Full Wiki

More info on PIPES

PIPES: Wikis

Advertisements
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

PIPES
Chemical structure of PIPES
IUPAC name
Other names PIPES
Identifiers
CAS number 5625-37-6
Properties
Molecular formula C8H18N2O6S2
Molar mass 302.37
Appearance White powder
Melting point

Decomposes above 300°C

Boiling point

Decomposes

Solubility in water 1 g/L (100°C)
Hazards
MSDS External MSDS
Main hazards Irritant
NFPA 704
NFPA 704.svg
0
1
0
 
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C, 100 kPa)
Infobox references

PIPES is the common name for piperazine-N,N′-bis(2-ethanesulfonic acid), a frequently used buffering agent in biochemistry. It is an ethanesulfonic acid buffer developed by Good et al. in the 1960s.[1]

Applications

PIPES has pKa near the physiological pH which makes it useful in cell culture work. PIPES has been documented minimizing lipid loss when buffering glutaraldehyde histology in plant and animal tissues.[2][3] Fungal zoospore fixation for fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy were optimized with a combination of glutaraldehyde and formaldehyde in PIPES buffer.[4] It has a negligible capacity to bind divalent ions.

References

  1. ^ Good, N.E. et al., Biochemistry, 5, 456-477 (1966).
  2. ^ Salema, R. and Brando, I., J. Submicr. Cytol., 9, 79 (1973).
  3. ^ Schiff, R.I. and Gennaro, J.F., Scaning Electron Microsc., 3, 449 (1979).
  4. ^ Hardham, A.R., J. Histochem., 33, 110 (1985).

See also

Advertisements

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message