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For the town in Armenia, see Nagapetavan.
Paros
Πάρος
view of Parikia
view of Parikia
Geography
Dimos Parou.png
Coordinates: 37°5′N 25°9′E / 37.083°N 25.15°E / 37.083; 25.15
Island Chain: Cyclades
Total Isles: 7
Area: 196.308 km² (76 sq.mi.)
Highest Mountain: Mt. Marpissa (724 m (2,375 ft))
Government
Greece Greece
Periphery: South Aegean
Prefecture: Cyclades
Capital: Parikia
Statistics
Population: 12,853 (as of 2001)
Density: 65 /km² (170 /sq.mi.)
Postal Code: 844 00
Area Code: 22840
License Code: EM
Website
www.paros.gr

Paros (Greek: Πάρος; Venetian: Paro) is an island of Greece in the central Aegean Sea. One of the Cyclades island group, it lies to the west of Naxos, from which it is separated by a channel about 8 km (5 mi) wide. It lies approximately 100 nmi (185 km) south-east of Piraeus. Today, Paros is one of the most popular European tourist hotspots. The Municipality of Paros includes numerous uninhabited offshore islets totaling 196.308 km² of land. Its nearest neighbor is the Community of Antiparos, lying to its southwest. Paros also became known for its fine white marble which gave rise to the term Parian which is used for China and fine marbles worldwide.[1]

Contents

Geography

Paros' geographic co-ordinates are 37° N. lat, and 25° 10' E. long. The area is 165 km2 (64 sq mi). Its greatest length from N.E. to S.W. is 13 mi (21 km), and its greatest breadth 10 mi (16 km). The island is of a round, plump-pear shape, formed by a single mountain (724 m (2,375 ft)) sloping evenly down on all sides to a maritime plain, which is broadest on the north-east and south-west sides. The island is composed of marble, though gneiss and mica-schist are to be found in a few places. To the west of Paros lies its smaller sister island Antiparos. At its narrowest, the channel between the two islands is less than 2 km wide. A car-carrying shuttle-ferry operates all day (to and from Pounda, 3 miles south of Parikia). In addition a dozen smaller islets surround Paros.

Paros has numerous beaches including Chrissí Aktí (Golden Beach, Greece) near Drios on the east coast, at Pounda, Logaras, Piso Livadi, Naoussa bay, Parikia and Agia Irini. The constant strong wind in the strait between Paros and Naxos makes it a favoured windsurfing location.

Islands

  • Gaiduronisi - north of Xifara
  • Portes Island - west of the town of Paros
  • Tigani Island - southwest of Paros
  • Drionisi -southeast of Paros

History

Antiquity

The story that Paros was colonized by one Paros of Parrhasia, who brought with him a colony of Arcadians to the island[2] is one of those etymological fictions which abound in Greek legend. Ancient names of the island are said to have been Plateia (or Pactia), Demetrias, Strongyli (meaning round due to the round shape of the island), Hyria, Hyleessa, Minoa and Cabarnis.[3]

Windmill in Parikía. The traditional Cyclades design

From Athens the island later received a colony of Ionians[4] under whom it attained a high degree of prosperity. It sent out colonies to Thasos[5] and Parium on the Hellespont. In the former colony, which was planted in the 15th or 18th Olympiad, the poet Archilochus, native of Paros, is said to have taken part. As late as 385 BC the Parians, in conjunction with Dionysius of Syracuse, founded a colony on the Illyrian island of Pharos (Hvar).[6]

Shortly before the Persian War Paros seems to have been a dependency of Naxos.[7] In the first Greco-Persian War (490 B.C.), Paros sided with the Persians and sent a trireme to Marathon to support them. In retaliation, the capital Paros was besieged by an Athenian fleet under Miltiades, who demanded a fine of 100 talents. But the town offered a vigorous resistance, and the Athenians were obliged to sail away after a siege of 26 days, during which they had laid the island waste. It was at a temple of Demeter Thesmophoros in Paros that Miltiades received the wound of which he afterwards died.[8] By means of an inscription Ross was enabled to identify the site of the temple; it lies, as Herodotus suggests, on a low hill beyond the boundaries of the town.

Paros also sided with shahanshah Xerxes I of Persia against Greece in the second Greco-Persian War (480 - 479 B.C.), but after the battle of Artemisium the Parian contingent remained inactive at Kythnos watching the progress of events.[9] For their support of the Persians, the islanders were later punished by the Athenian war leader Themistocles, who exacted a heavy fine.[10]

Under the Delian League, the Athenian-dominated naval confederacy (477 - 404 B.C.), Paros paid the highest tribute of all the island members: 30 talents annually, according to the estimate of Olympiodorus (429 B.C.).[11] This implies that Paros was then one of the wealthiest islands in the Aegean. Little is known of the constitution of Paros, but inscriptions seem to show that it was modeled on Athenian democracy, with a boule (senate) at the head of affairs.[12] In 410 BC the Athenian general Theramenes found an oligarchy governing Paros; he deposed it and restored the democracy.[13] Paros was included in the second Athenian confederacy (the Second Athenian Empire 378 - 355 B.C.). In c.357 B.C., along with Chios, it severed its connection with Athens.

From the inscription of Adule we learn that the Cyclades, presumably including Paros, were subject to the Ptolemies, the Hellenistic dynasty that ruled Egypt (305 - 30 B.C.). Paros then became part of the Roman Empire and later of its Greek-speaking successor state, the Byzantine Empire.

Crusades

In 1204, the soldiers of the Fourth Crusade seized Constantinople and overthrew the Byzantine Empire. Although a residual Byzantine state known as the Empire of Nicaea survived the Crusader onslaught and eventually recovered Constantinople (1261), many of the original Byzantine territories, including Paros, were lost permanently to the crusading powers. Paros became subject to the Duchy of the Archipelago, a fiefdom made up of various Aegean islands ruled by a Venetian duke as nominal vassal of a succession of crusader states. In practice, however, the duchy was always a client state of the Republic of Venice.

Ottoman Era and independence

In 1537, Paros was conquered by the Ottoman Turks and remained under the Ottoman Empire until the Greek War of Independence (1821-1829). During the Russo-Turkish War (1768–1774) in 1770–1775 Naousa Bay was the base of Russian Archipelago Squadron of Count Alexey Orlov; here was organized the Russian Admiralty. Under the Treaty of Constantinople (1832), Paros became part of the newly independent Kingdom of Greece, the first time the Parians were ruled by fellow Greeks for over six centuries. At this time, Paros became the home of a heroine of the nationalist movement, Manto Mavrogenous, who had both financed and fought in the war for independence. Her house, near Ekatontapiliani church, is today a historical monument.

Landmarks

Whitewashed homes in Lefkes
The church of the 100 doors in Paroikia

The capital, Parikia (Italian: Parechia), situated on a bay on the north-west side of the island, occupies the site of the ancient capital Paros. Parikía harbour is a major hub for Aegean islands ferries and catamarans, with several sailings each day for Piraeus (the port of Athens), Heraklion (the capital of Crete) and other islands such as Naxos, Ios, Santorini, and Mykonos.

In Parikia town, houses are built and decorated in the traditional Cycladic style with flat roofs, whitewash walls and blue-painted doors and window frames and shutters. Shadowed by luxuriant vines, and surrounded by gardens of oranges and pomegranates, the houses give the town a picturesque and pleasing aspect. On a rock beside the sea are the remains of a medieval castle, built almost entirely of the marble remains of an ancient temple. Similar traces of antiquity, in the shape of bas-reliefs, inscriptions, columns, & etc., are numerous. On a rock shelf to the south are remains of a precinct which was dedicated to Asclepius. In addition, close to the modern harbour, the remains of an ancient cemetery are visible, since being discovered recently during non-archaeological excavations.

In Parikia's main square is the town's principal church, the Ekatontapiliani (literally: "church of the hundred doors"). Its oldest features almost certainly predate the adoption of Christianity as the state religion of the Roman Empire (391 AD). It is said to have been founded by the mother of the Roman Emperor Constantine the Great (ruled 306–337 AD), Saint Helen, during her pilgrimage to the Holy Land. There are two adjoining chapels, one of very early form, and also a baptistery with a cruciform font.

settlement of the Castle of the Francs

On the north side of the island is the bay of Naoussa (Naussa) or Agoussa, forming a safe and spacious harbour. In ancient times it was closed by a chain or boom. Another good harbour is that of Drios on the south-east side, where the Turkish fleet used to anchor on its annual voyage through the Aegean during the period of Ottoman rule over Paros (1537 - 1832).

The three villages of Dragoulas, Mármara and Tsipidos, situated on an open plain on the eastern side of the island, and rich in remains of antiquity, probably occupy the site of an ancient town. They are known together as the "villages of Kephalos" after the steep and lofty hill of Kephalos. On this hilltop stands the abandoned monastery of Agios Antonios (St. Anthony). Around it are the ruins of a medieval castle which belonged in the late Middle Ages to the Venetian noble family of the Venieri. They gallantly but vainly defended it against the Turkish admiral Barbarossa in 1537.

Parian marble, which is white and translucent (semi-transparent), with a coarse grain and a very beautiful texture, was the chief source of wealth for the island. The celebrated marble quarries lie on the northern side of the mountain anciently known as Marathi (afterwards Capresso), a little below a former convent of St Mina. The marble, which was exported from the 6th century BC onwards, was used by Praxiteles and other great Greek sculptors. It was obtained by means of subterranean quarries driven horizontally or at a descending angle into the rock. The marble thus quarried by lamplight was given the name of Lychnites, Lychneus (from lychnos, a lamp), or Lygdos.[14] Several of these tunnels are still to be seen. At the entrance to one of them is a bas-relief dedicated to Pan and the nymphs. Several attempts to work the marble have been made in modern times, but it has not been exported in any great quantities.

Parikia town has a small but interesting archaeological museum housing some of the many finds from sites in Paros. The best pieces, however, are in the Athens National Archaeological Museum. The Paros museum contains a fragment of the Parian Chronicle, a remarkable chronology of ancient Greece. Inscribed in marble, its entries give time elapsed between key events from the most distant past (1500 BC) down to 264 BC.[15]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Parian - definition of Parian by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia". Thefreedictionary.com. http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Parian. Retrieved 2009-05-06.  
  2. ^ Heraclides De rebus publicis 8
  3. ^ Stephanos Byz.
  4. ^ Schol. Dionys. Perieg. 525; Herodian I.171
  5. ^ Thucydides Peloponnesian War IV.104; Strabo Geography 487
  6. ^ Diodorus Siculus XV.13
  7. ^ Herodotus Histories V.31
  8. ^ Herodotus op.cit. VI.133-136
  9. ^ Herodotus op.cit. VIII.67
  10. ^ Herodotus op.cit. VIII.112
  11. ^ Olympiodorus 88.4
  12. ^ Corpus Inscriptionum Graecarum 2376-2383; Ross, Inscr. med. II.147, 148
  13. ^ Diodorus Siculus XIII.47
  14. ^ Pliny the Elder Historia Naturalis XXXVI. 5, 14; Plato Eryxias, 400 D; Athenodorus V.205 f; Diodorus Siculus 2.52
  15. ^ Inscriptiones Graecae XII.100 seqq.

Notable people

Ancient

Modern

Sources

External links


Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikitravel

Paros is a major island of the Cyclades group.

A view of some of the same roads in the capital, Parikia
A view of some of the same roads in the capital, Parikia

Paros is a Greek island in the Cyclades group, neighbouring Naxos and is one of the most popular holiday destinations for visitors to the Greek islands.

Paros is the second largest island of the Cyclades. It has an area of 186 square kilometres and a coastline 120km long. The island has the advantage of being located centrally in the Cyclades near Naxos, Ios, Sifnos and Syros. Most of the ferries to Naxos and Santorini make a stop first at Paros.

The island is the third in popularity of the group. First are Santorini and Mykonos.

Paros is considered as one of the most beautiful islands of the Cyclades. It is characterized by the many beaches and also the charming villages: Parikia (the main town), Naoussa, Lefkes, Marpissa and other. Naoussa is a old fishing village turned into a cosmopolitan top holiday destination. The village is characterized by its Venetian port and its many fish restaurants. The architecture of the area is also incredible.

Paros is also know for its excellent wind conditions for the practice of windsurfing and kite surfing.

Talk

In Paros most of the population can speak English except the older generation. In many bars, pubs, restaurants and shops there is somebody who speaks English, Italian, or German.

Get in

By sea

Ferries and Highspeed catamaran services [1] run daily from Piraeus, Cyclades and Heraklion - Crete island.

The ferry landing is haunted by dozens of room-hawkers, and is manic. If you arrive during a high wind and/or at night, it can all be a bit overwhelming. Know where you're going, and book ahead.

By plane

Olympic Airways [2] and AirSea Lines [3] operate a daily air service from Athens.

Get around

Within the resorts walking is the best method of transport. Bus services operate between the towns. Car hire is readily available in all towns and is relatively cheap.

Remote Light House
Remote Light House

Don't miss the church of Panagia Ekatontapiliani which means the church of 100 doors , in Parikia (very close to the harbour) a 17th century monument. The original church was built by St. Helen , the mother of St. Constantine , according to the legend . The old town of Parikia is considered to be the biggest in the Cyclades island. You will find alleys untouched from the touristic wave that reduces the beauty of these settlements. Lefkes village is in the middle of the island with many nice tavernas, and beautiful alleys. From Lefkes you can take a very nice walk at the old stones of the Byzantine Route down to Prodromos.

Do

A fantastic place to take the kids is Aqua Park. Boats leave hourly from Naoussa and takes approximately 15 minutes.

Visit as many beaches as you can, don't stay in one every day. Every beach has a different feeling. Try Farangas, Parasporos, Krios, Kato yalos, Agia Irini, Logaras is very nice for families.

Paros is also famous for its watersports, specifically wind and kitesurfing. The eastern coastal town of Dryos with neighboring beaches of "chryssi akti" translated golden beach and "tserdakia" known as new golden beach are the most popular surfing destinations. The latter was the site of the 2000 and 2003 PWA IFCA international windsurfing championships as well as other international events. The location has once again been selected for the 2010 championships.

Tao's [4] is a is a retreat and meditation centre located on top of hill, over-looking the Aegean Sea and the neighbouring islands. There are on-going daily activities, self-development seminars and a long-stay Work & Study program, along with Oriental-Thai cuisine and Cafe-Bar.

Eat

In Parikia's sea front you will find many nice tavernas with excellent food,exacly behind in the old town wander along the narrow streets with the many kind of shops, and the unique cycladic atmospfere.

Don't forget to seat in one of the many "Ouzeri" in Naoussa and taste Gouna fish and octopus in vinegar.

Drink

The Jazz Bar on Market St in Parikia serves a great Martini!

A popular place to watch the famous sunsets is the windmill bar by Pandrossos Hotel.

One favourite bar to watch the world go by is Pebbles jazz bar on the south harbour promenade.

Resalto bar A very nice bar in the port of Drios, plays the best rock music in Paros.

The Pirates bar in the narrow roads of the Market of Paroikia plays the best jazz music and offers a great lounge environment!

Alexandros Cafe This is a unique cafe in an old windmill, nowadays a cafe with magnificent view to the traditional settlement of Parikia and the sunset.

  • Ampeli Studios [5] Family run studios located in Parikia close to the beach and the port. Very economy prices.
  • Anna Platanou [6] This is a friendly family run accommodation offering rooms and apartments in Parikia close to the beach and the old town with sea view. Very nice and helpful owners.
  • Archipelagos Resort hotel [7]in Paros Island is on the west coast of the island at the beach of Agia Eirini. This 5 star hotel caters for all types of guests but is ideal for families.
  • Kallisti Paros hotels [8]in Paros Island is an elegant hotel, located a mere 400 meters from the center of Naoussa, overlooking the sparkling Aegean.
  • Argonauta Hotel, Paroikia 84400 Paros, +30(22840)21440,22278 (fax: +30(22840)23442), [9]. A pleasant family run hotel in a characterful building which has the advantage of being centrally located and near the boat docks yet on a quiet square.  edit
  • Corali Hotel (Corali Hotel - Paros Greece), Piso Livadi, +30 22840 41880, [10]. checkin: 12:30PM; checkout: 11:30AM. 50.  edit
  • Dryades B&B Dryos [11] phone +30(22840)41422 mobile +30 6978 257 857 Located in the seaside village of Dryos, this B&B operated by a young Greek-American family offers a clean, comfortable accommodation away from the crowds. All studios are equipped with a kitchenette, wc, air-conditioning, tv and a private balcony or terrace with an unobstructed ocean view. The 4 acre property is landscaped with a wide variety of flowers and fruit trees.
  • EpiStudios Matsas Windmill, Naoussa, Paros Island, (+30) 210-6626878, 210-6026454, 22840-53017, [12]. info@epistudios.com In Naoussa, "Epistudios Matsas Windmill" offer an A' Class set of apartments, 150 meters from the beach of Aghii Anarghyri, just a 3 minute walk from the harbor of Naoussa harbor.  edit
  • Lefkes Village Hotel, Lefkes 84400 Paros, +3022840 41827, +306932753415 (fax: +3022840 41827), [13]. A First class Hotel with 20 spacious rooms in the village of Lefkes.  edit
  • Rafaella Studios Clean, simple apartments close to the beaches of Parikia but still quiet. Very nice owners.
  • Ragoussis House [14] - traditional cycladic rooms, studios and apartments located on a small hill between the Logaras beach and Pounda Beach near the small fishing-village of Piso Livadi. The Athens-based owners are very helpful, and offer transfer to the hotel from both the port and the airport.
  • Kalypso Hotel & Apartments, Agii Anargiri beach, Naousa, +30 22840 51777, [15]. checkin: 12:30AM; checkout: 11:45 am.. Close to the cosmopolitan fishing village of Naousa lies hotel & apartments "Kalypso". With excellent view of the bay of Agii Anargyri and enchanting surroundings it becomes a unique option for visitors of Paros island. Here you 'll find high speed internet, satelite tv, A/C in every room and a lovely bar that serves outdoors also.  edit
  • Zefi Hotel and Apartments (Zefi Hotel Apartments Naoussa Paros), Naoussa Paros Greece, +30 22840 51789, [16]. checkin: 12:30 PM; checkout: 11:30 AM. The Zefi Hotel in Naoussa, Paros Greece, is a traditional complex of 38 rooms and apartments - Cycladic Island style - that offer visitors comfortable accommodations. Facilities include a swimming pool, jacuzzi, parking area etc. 55-165 euro.  edit
  • Kosmitis Hotel (Agii Anargiri Beach, Naoussa, Paros Greece), Agii Anargyri - Naoussa, 84401, Paros, +30 22840 52466, [17]. checkin: 12:30 PM; checkout: 11:30 AM. Kosmitis Hotel is a 4 star **** establishment situated on Agii Anargyri Beach, just 800 meters from the popular resort of Naoussa, Paros, Greece. It is comprised of 32 fully-equipped and traditionally styled rooms, assuring you relaxing accommodation on Paros Island. 80-195 euro.  edit
  • Senia Hotel (Rooms, Apartments and Suites, Naoussa, Paros Greece), Naoussa, 84401, Paros, Cyclades Islands, Greece, +30 22840 51971, [18]. checkin: 12:30 PM; checkout: 11:30 AM. The Senia Hotel belongs to the 4-star category and is situated in the extremely charming settlement of Naoussa, Paros Island, Greece. It is comprised of spacious rooms, apartments and suites that are stylishly designed and equipped for a comfortable and carefree stay and can accommodate from 2 to 6 persons. 50-260 euro.  edit
  • Captain Nicolas (Hotel Apartments and Studios in Paros (Naoussa)), Naoussa, 84401, Paros Island, Greece, +30 22840 52340, [19]. checkin: 12:30 PM; checkout: 11:30 AM. Captain Nicolas Hotel Apartments and Studios complex belongs to the 4-star category of Naoussa Paros hotels. It is situated right on the beach, and is comprised of 18 spacious, comfortable and fully-equipped studios and apartments.  edit
  • Kallisti Rooms & Apartments, Naoussa, 84401, Paros, Cyclades Islands, Greece, +30 22840 52219, [20]. checkin: 12:30 PM; checkout: 11:30 AM. Kallisti is an elegant hotel, located 400 meters from Naoussa of Paros, overlooking the Aegean Sea. All rooms and apartments are tastefully decorated and fully-equipped with a bathroom, a fridge, a TV, a phone, air-conditioning, and a veranda or a balcony with a seaview or mountain view. Facilities include a swimming pool, an indoor and outdoor cafe, a lounge and many more. Breakfast included. 55-140 euro.  edit
  • Paliomylos Hotel Apartments & Studios, Naoussa, 84401, Paros, Cyclades Islands, Greece, +30 22840 51151, [21]. checkin: 12:30 PM; checkout: 11:30 AM. The Paliomylos Hotel is located in Naoussa of Paros, just 50 meters from the beach. All hotel apartments and studios are air-conditioned and have a bathroom, a kitchen, a phone, a TV, a fridge, and a balcony or veranda with breathtaking view of the sea. Visitors are provided with a swimming pool, a breakfast lounge, a bar, a living room, a café, a TV room, and a parking lot. from 65 euro.  edit
  • Sofia Pension Hotel (Rooms in Parikia, Paros), Parikia, 84400, Paros, Cyclades Islands, Greece, +30 22840 22085, [22]. checkin: 12:30 PM; checkout: 11:30 AM. The Sofia Pension Rooms in Parikia of Paros belongs to the 4-star category of Paros hotels. Offers double and triple rooms. All rooms are air-conditioned and include: a private bathroom with a hair dryer, a fridge, a satellite TV, a safe deposit box, a private balcony or veranda with a wonderful garden view. 70-120 euro.  edit
  • Aloni Hotel, Piso Livadi, 84400, Paros, Cyclades Islands, Greece, + 30 22840 43238, [23]. checkin: 12:30 PM; checkout: 11:30 AM. The Aloni Hotel is situated in the charming seaside village of Piso Livadi, on the eastern coast of Paros Island Greece. It offers 37 tastefully-furnished hotel rooms, an apartment (up to 6 persons) and a suite that may host from 2 to 4 people, all of which are air-conditioned and include all modern facilities and a veranda with seaview. A swimming pool and a parking lot are also provided. 40-185 euro.  edit

Get out

The main night life destination is the quaint town of Naoussa where you can enjoy a meal by the sea.


1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

PAROS, or Paro, an island in the Aegean Sea, one of the largest of the group of the Cyclades, with a population of 8000. It lies to the west of Naxos, from which it is separated by a channel about 6 m. broad, and with which it is now grouped together, in popular language, under the common name of Paronaxia. It is in 37° N. lat. and 25° 10' E. long. Its greatest length from N.E. to S.W. is 13.m., and its greatest breadth io m. It is formed of a single mountain about 2500 ft. high, sloping evenly down on all sides to a maritime plain, which is broadest on the north-east and south-west sides. The island is composed of marble, though gneiss and mica-schist are to be found in a few places. The capital, Paroekia or Parikia (Italian, Parechia), situated on a bay on the north-west side of the island, occupies the site of the ancient capital Paros. Its harbour admits small vessels; the entrance is dangerous on account of rocks. Houses built in the Italian style with terraced roofs, shadowed by luxuriant vines, and surrounded by gardens of oranges and pomegranates, give to the town a picturesque and pleasing aspect. Here on a rock beside the sea are the remains of a medieval castle built almost entirely of ancient marble remains. Similar traces of antiquity in the shape of bas-reliefs, inscriptions, columns, &c., are numerous in the town, and on a terrace to the south of it is a precinct of Asclepius. Outside the town is the church of Katapoliani CH `EKaTovra7rvAcavii), said to have been founded by the empress Helena; there are two adjoining churches, one of very early form, and also a baptistery with a cruciform font.

On the north side of the island is the bay of Naoussa (Naussa) or Agoussa, forming a safe and roomy harbour. In ancient times it was closed by a chain or boom. Another good harbour is that of Drios on the south-east side, where the Turkish fleet used to anchor on its annual voyage through the Aegean. The three villages of Tragoulas, Marmora and Kepidi (Kniri&c, pronounced Tschipidi), situated on an open plain on the eastern side of the island, and rich in remains of antiquity, probably occupy the site of an ancient town. They are known together as the "villages of Kephalos," from the steep and lofty headland of Kephalos. On this headland stands an abandoned monastery of St Anthony, amidst the ruins of a medieval castle, which belonged to the Venetian family of the Venieri, and was gallantly though fruitlessly defended against the Turkish general Barbarossa in 1537.

Parian marble, which is white and semi-transparent, with a coarse grain and a very beautiful texture, was the chief source of wealth to the island. The celebrated marble quarries lie on the northern side of the mountain anciently known as Marpessa (afterwards Capresso), a little below a former convent of St Mina. The marble, which was exported from the 6th century B.C., and used by Praxiteles and other great Greek sculptors, was obtained by means of subterranean quarries driven horizontally or at a descending angle into the rock, and the marble thus quarried by lamplight got the name of Lychnites, Lychneus (from lychnos, a lamp), or Lygdos (Plin. H. N. xxxvi. 5, 14; Plato, Eryxias, 400 D; Athen. V. 2050; Diod. Sic. 2, 52). Several of these tunnels are still to be seen. At the entrance to one of them is a bas-relief dedicated to Pan and the Nymphs. Several attempts to work the marble have been made in modern times, but it has not been exported in any great quantities.

History

The story that Paros was colonized by one Paros of Parrhasia, who brought with him a colony of Arcadians to the island (Heraclides, De rubus publicis, 8; Steph. Byz. s.v. IIizpos), is one of those etymologizing fictions in which Greek legend abounds. Ancient names of the island are said to have been Plateia (or Pactia), Demetrias, Zacynthus, Hyria, Hyleessa, Minoa and Cabarnis (Steph. Byz.). From Athens the island afterwards received a colony of Ionians (Schol. Dionys. Per. 525; cf. Herod. i. 171), under whom it attained a high degree of prosperity. It sent out colonies to Thasos (Thuc. iv. 104; Strabo, 487) and Parium on the Hellespont. In the former colony, which was planted in the 15th or 18th Olympiad, the poet Archilochus, native of Paros, is said to have taken part. As late as 385 B.C. the Parians, in conjunction with Dionysius of Syracuse, founded a colony on the Illyrian island of Pharos (Diod. Sic. xv. 13). So high was the reputation of the Parians that they were chosen by the people of Miletus to arbitrate in a party dispute (Herod. v. 28 seq.). Shortly before the Persian War Paros seems to have been a dependency of Naxos (Herod. v. 31). In the Persian War Paros sided with the Persians and sent a trireme to Marathon to support them.

In retaliation, the capital Paros was besieged by an Athenian fleet under Miltiades, who demanded a fine of ioo talents. But the town offered a vigorous resistance, and the Athenians were obliged to sail away after a siege of twenty-six days, during which they had laid the island waste. It was at a temple of Demeter Thesmophorus in Paros that Miltiades received the wound of which he afterwards died (Herod. vi. 133-136). By means of an inscription Ross was enabled to identify the site of the temple; it lies, in agreement with the description of Herodotus, on a low hill beyond the boundaries of the town.. Paros also sided with Xerxes against Greece, but after the battle of Artemisium the Parian contingent remained in Cythnos watching the progress of events (Herod. viii. 67). For this unpatriotic conduct the islanders were punished by Themistocles, who exacted a heavy fine (Herod. viii. 112). Under the Athenian naval confederacy, Paros paid the highest tribute of all the islands subject to Athens - 30 talents annually, according to the assessment of Olymp. 88, 4 (4 2 9 B.C.). Little is known of the constitution of Paros, but inscriptions seem to show that it was democratic, with a senate (Boole) at the head of affairs (Corpus inscript. 2376-2383; Ross, Inscr. fined. ii. 147, 148). In 410 B.C. the Athenian general Theramenes found an oligarchy at Paros; he deposed it and restored the democracy (Diod. Sic. xiii. 47). Paros was included in the new Athenian confederacy of 378 B.C., but afterwards, along with Chios, it renounced its connexion with Athens, probably about 357 B.C. Thenceforward the island lost its political importance. From the inscription of Adule we learn that the Cyclades, and consequently Paros, were subject to the Ptolemies of Egypt. Afterwards they passed under the rule of Rome. When the Latins made themselves masters of Constantinople, Paros, like the rest, became subject to Venice. In 1537 it was conquered by the Turks. The island now belongs to the kingdom of Greece.

Among the most interesting discoveries made in the island is the Parian Chronicle.

See Tournefort, Voyage du Levant, i. 232 seq. (Lyons, 1717); Clarke, Travels, iii. (London, 1814); Leake, Travels in Northern Greece, iii. 84 seq. (London, 1835); Prokesch, Denkwiirdigkeiten,. ii. 19 seq. (Stuttgart, 1836); Ross. Reisen auf den griechischen Inseln, i. 44 seq. (Stuttgart, and Tubingen, 1840); Fiedler, Reise durch alle The'le des Konigreiches Griechenland, ii. 179 seq. (Leipzig, 1841); Bursian, Geographie von Griechenland, ii. 483 seq. (Leipzig, 1872). For the Parian Chronicle, Inscriptiones graecae, xii. 100 sqq.


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Simple English

[[File:|right|thumb|200px|A typical village in Paros]] Paros is a Greek island which belongs in Cyclades group. It is the third largest island in the Cyclades. Its area is 195 square meter and its population is 12,853. The island has got a scheme almost circular. The most largest towns in Paros is Paroikia (or Paros city) and Naoussa.

Sights-Architecture

The island is very touristic. Every summer many thousands tourists came to Paros. The most of them came from European countries. The island has got beautiful beaches and very beautiful villages. The main feature of the villages of Paros is its important architecture. The houses of the villages has got cubic scheme with intense white colour. The windows and the doors has got an intense colour, usually azure or blue[1].

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