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Patrick II (1185–1248), called "5th Earl of Dunbar",[1] lord of Beanley, was a 13th century Anglo-Scottish noble, and one of the leading figures during the reign of King Alexander II of Scotland.

Said to be aged forty-six at the time of his father's death, this Patrick was the eldest son of Patrick I, Earl of Dunbar and Ada, daughter of King William of Scotland. He probably succeeded to his father's lands some time before the latter's death on December 31, 1232, as his father was elderly and had been ill for some time.

He renounced his claim to some disputed Marches in lower Lauderdale to the monks of Melrose, and in 1235 he, with Adam, Abbot of Melrose, and Gilbert, Bishop of Galloway, led an expedition against an uprising in Galloway. He accompanied King Alexander II of Scotland to York and was a witness and guarantor to the treaty with King Henry II of England, in 1237.

Shortly after 1242 the Earl of Dunbar was sent to subdue the rebellious Thane of Argyll. The Earl held first rank among the twenty-four barons who guaranteed the Treaty of Peace with England in 1244.

Holinshed relates, he accompanied Lindsay of Glenesk, and Stewart of Dundonald to crusade, where he died in 1249 at the siege of Damietta in Egypt.

Before 1213, he married Euphemia (d. 1267 at Whittingehame),[2][3] daughter of Walter FitzAlan, 3rd High Steward High Steward of Scotland and lord of Kyle, Strathgryfe and Bute.[1]

Issue by Euphemia:

Notes

  1. ^ a b c Fiona Watson, "Dunbar, Patrick, eighth earl of Dunbar or of March, and earl of Moray (1285–1369)", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edn, October 2005 accessed 29 July 2007, under Patrick Dunbar, fifth earl of Dunbar (c1186 – June 1249).
  2. ^ Miller, James, The History of Dunbar, Dunbar, 1830, p.18, which states that "Euphemia, daughter of Walter High Steward of Scotland, brought to her marriage the lands of Birkenside in Lauderdale"
  3. ^ Burke, Sir Bernard, Ulster King of Arms, Burke's Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, London, 1883: 606
  4. ^ Weis, Fredk., Lewis, Th.D., et al., The Magna Charta Sureties 1215, 5th edition, Baltimore, 1999: 63
  5. ^ Richardson, Douglas, Magna Carta Ancestry, Baltmore, 2005: 210

References

  • Anderson, Alan O., M.A., Scottish Annals from English Chroniclers AD500 to 1286, London, 1908, p. 360.
  • Dunbar, Sr Archibald H., Bt., Scottish Kings, a Revised Chronology of Scottish History, 1005 - 1625, Edinburgh, 1899, p. 282.
  • McDonald, Andrew, 'Patrick, fourth earl of Dunbar (d. 1232)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 28 November 2006
  • Young, Alan, Robert the Bruce's Rivals: The Comyns, 1212-1314, East Linton, 1997. *
    *Where he is wrongly styled "Patrick I"
Preceded by
Patrick I
Earl of Dunbar (Lothian)
1232–1248
Succeeded by
Patrick III
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