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Paul McAuley at Worldcon 2005 in Glasgow

Paul J. McAuley (born 23 April 1955), a British botanist and award-winning author.

By training a biologist, UK science fiction author McAuley writes mostly "hard science fiction", dealing with themes such as biotechnology, alternate history/alternate reality, and space travel.

McAuley began with far-future "space opera" with Four Hundred Billion Stars, its sequel Eternal Light, and the planetary-colony adventure Of the Fall. Red Dust, set on a far-future Mars colonized by the Chinese, is a planetary romance filled with all the latest SF ideas: nanotechnology, biotechnology, artificial intelligence, personality downloads, virtual reality. The Confluence trilogy, set in an even more distant future (about ten million years from now), is one of a number of novels to use Frank J. Tipler's Omega Point Theory (that the universe seems to be evolving toward a maximum degree of complexity and consciousness) as one of its themes. About the same time, he published Pasquale's Angel, set in an alternate Italian Renaissance and featuring Niccolò Machiavegli (Machiavelli) and Leonardo da Vinci as major characters.

McAuley has also used biotechnology and nanotechnology themes in near-future settings: Fairyland describes a dystopian, war-torn Europe where genetically engineered "dolls" are used as disposable slaves. Since 2001 he has produced several SF-based techno-thrillers such as The Secret of Life, Whole Wide World, and White Devils.

Four Hundred Billion Stars, his first novel, won the Philip K. Dick Award in 1988[1]. Fairyland won the 1996 Arthur C. Clarke Award[2] and the 1997 John W. Campbell Memorial Award for Best SF Novel[3]. "The Temptation of Dr. Stein," won the British Fantasy Award. Pasquale's Angel won the Sidewise Award for Alternate History (Long Form).

Contents

Bibliography

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Novels

  • Four Hundred Billion Stars
    • Four Hundred Billion Stars. London: Gollancz, 1988. ISBN 0-575-04260-5 -- Philip K. Dick Award winner, 1988[1]
    • Secret Harmonies (vt US Of the Fall). London: Gollancz, 1989. ISBN 0-575-04580-9
    • Eternal Light. London: Gollancz, 1991. ISBN 0-575-04931-6 -- BSFA Award nominee, 1991[4] and Clarke Award nominee, 1992[5]
  • Red Dust. London: Gollancz, 1993. ISBN 0-575-05488-3
  • Pasquale's Angel. London: Gollancz, 1994. ISBN 0-575-05489-1 -- Clarke and British Fantasy Awards nominee, 1995[6]
  • Fairyland. London: Gollancz, 1995. ISBN 0-575-06070-0 -- BSFA Award nominee, 1995[6]; Clarke Award winner, 1996[2]; Campbell Award winner, 1997[3]
  • The Confluence Series:
    • Child of the River. London: Gollancz, 1997. ISBN 0-575-06427-7
    • Ancients of Days. London: Gollancz, 1998. ISBN 0-575-06428-5
    • Shrine of Stars. London: Gollancz, 1999. ISBN 0-575-06429-3
  • The Secret of Life. London: Voyager, 2001. ISBN 0-00-225904-4 -- BSFA Award nominee, 2001[7]; Clarke Award nominee, 2002[8]
  • Whole Wide World. London: Voyager, 2002. ISBN 0-00-225903-6
  • White Devils. London: Simon & Schuster, 2004. ISBN 0-7432-3885-0 -- Campbell Award nominee, 2005[9]
  • Mind's Eye. London: Simon & Schuster, 2005. ISBN 0-7432-3887-7 -- Campbell Award nominee, 2006[9]
  • Players. London: Simon & Schuster, 2007. ISBN 0-7432-7617-5
  • Cowboy Angels: London: Gollancz, 2007. ISBN 978-0-575-07934-7
  • The Quiet War: London, Gollancz, 2008. ISBN 978-0575079335 -- Clarke Award nominee, 2009[10]

Novellas

Collections

  • King of the Hill. London: Gollancz, 1988. ISBN 0-575-05001-2
  • The Invisible Country. London: Gollancz, 1996. ISBN 0-575-06072-7 -- Philip K. Dick Award nominee, 1998[11]
  • Little Machines. Harrogate: PS Publishing, 2005. ISBN 1-902880-94-3

See also: "Gene Wars" (1991)

References

  1. ^ a b "1988 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. http://www.worldswithoutend.com/books_year_index.asp?year=1988. Retrieved 2009-05-16.  
  2. ^ a b "1996 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. http://www.worldswithoutend.com/books_year_index.asp?year=1996. Retrieved 2009-05-16.  
  3. ^ a b "1997 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. http://www.worldswithoutend.com/books_year_index.asp?year=1997. Retrieved 2009-05-16.  
  4. ^ "1991 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. http://www.worldswithoutend.com/books_year_index.asp?year=1991. Retrieved 2009-05-16.  
  5. ^ "1992 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. http://www.worldswithoutend.com/books_year_index.asp?year=1992. Retrieved 2009-05-16.  
  6. ^ a b "1995 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. http://www.worldswithoutend.com/books_year_index.asp?year=1995. Retrieved 2009-05-16.  
  7. ^ "2001 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. http://www.worldswithoutend.com/books_year_index.asp?year=2001. Retrieved 2009-05-16.  
  8. ^ "2002 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. http://www.worldswithoutend.com/books_year_index.asp?year=2002. Retrieved 2009-05-16.  
  9. ^ a b "2005 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. http://www.worldswithoutend.com/books_year_index.asp?year=2005. Retrieved 2009-05-16.  
  10. ^ "2009 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. http://www.worldswithoutend.com/books_year_index.asp?year=2009. Retrieved 2009-05-16.  
  11. ^ "1998 Award Winners & Nominees". Worlds Without End. http://www.worldswithoutend.com/books_year_index.asp?year=1998. Retrieved 2009-05-16.  

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