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Peitho is also the name of an Oceanid. See 118 Peitho for the asteroid.

In Greek mythology, Peitho (Ancient Greek: Πειθώ; English translation: "persuasion") is the goddess who personifies persuasion and seduction. Her Roman name is Suadela. Although this goddess did not have much power, she is a figure of some significance in Classical Greece. Peitho, in her role as an attendant or companion of Aphrodite, was intimately connected to the goddess of love and beauty. Ancient artists and poets explored this connection in their works. The connection is even deeper in the context of Ancient Greek marriage because a suitor had to negotiate with the father of a young woman for her hand in marriage and offer a bridal price in return for her. The most desirable women drew many prospective suitors, and persuasive skill often determined their success. Aphrodite and Peitho were sometimes conflated to a certain extent, with the name Peitho appearing in conjunction with, or as an epithet of, Aphrodite's name. This helps to demonstrate how the relationship between persuasion and love (or desire) was important in Greek culture. Peitho's ancestry is somewhat unclear. According to Hesiod in the Theogony, Peitho was the daughter of the Titans Tethys and Oceanus, which would make her an Oceanid and therefore sister of such notable goddesses as Tyche, Doris, Metis, and Calypso. However, Hesiod's classification of Peitho as an Oceanid is contradicted by other sources. Other sources would say that Peitho is not only an attendant to Aphrodite but both her and Hermes' daughter, which would explain the connection of the symbolism of the two goddesses.

References

North, Helen F. (1993). "Emblems of Eloquence". Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society 137 (3): 406-430. http://books.google.com/books?id=wUwLAAAAIAAJ&lpg=PA408&dq=peitho&lr=&as_brr=1&as_pt=BOOKS&pg=PA406#v=onepage&q=peitho&f=false.  








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