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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A people's history or history from below is a type of historical narrative which attempts to account for historical events from the perspective of common people rather than political and other leaders.

Contents

Description

A people's history is the history of the world that is the story of mass movements and of the outsiders. Individuals not included in the past in other type of writing about history are part of this theory's primary focus, which includes the disenfranchised, the oppressed, the poor, the nonconformists, and the otherwise forgotten people. This theory also usually focuses on events occurring in the fullness of time, or when an overwhelming wave of smaller events cause certain developments to occur.

This revisionist approach to writing history is in direct opposition to methods which tend to emphasize single great figures in history, referred to as the Great man theory; it argues that the driving factor of history is the daily life of ordinary people, their social status and profession. These are the factors that "push and pull" on opinions and allow for trends to develop, as opposed to great people introducing ideas or initiating events.

In his book A People History of US, Howard Zinn wrote: "we must not accept the memory of states as our own. Nations are not communities and never have been, The history of any country, presented as the history of a family, conceals fierce conflicts of interest (sometimes exploding, most often repressed) between conquerors and conquered, masters and slaves, capitalists and workers, dominators and dominated in race and sex. And in such a world of conflict, a world of victims and executioners, it is the job of thinking people, as Albert Camus suggested, not to be on the side of the executioners."[1]

See also

  • Canada: A People's History (television documentary series)
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General

Other

References

Further reading

  • A People's History of the Russian Revolution by Kevin Murphy
  • A People's History of Florida 1513-1876: How Africans, Seminoles, Women, and Lower Class Whites Shaped the Sunshine State by Adam Wasserman
  • A People's History of England by A. L. Morton
  • A People’s History of Poverty in America by Stephen Pimpare
  • A People’s History of Sports in the United States by Dave Zirin
  • A People's History of the Mexican Revolution by Adolfo Gilly
  • A People's History of the United States by Howard Zinn
  • A People's History of the United States (in 8 volumes) by Page Smith
  • A People's History of the World by Chris Harman
  • The Blood Never Dried: A People's History of the British Empire by John Newsinger
  • A People's History of the Supreme Court by Peter Irons
  • The Assassination of Julius Caesar: A People's History of Ancient Rome by Michael Parenti
  • A People's History of the American Revolution: How Common People Shaped the Fight for Independence by Ray Raphael
  • A People's History of the Vietnam War by Jonathan Neale (US Title)
  • A People's History of the Civil War: Struggles for the Meaning of Freedom by David Williams
  • A People's History of Science: Miners, Midwives, and "Low Mechaniks" by Clifford D. Conner
  • The Congo: From Leopold to Kabila: A People's History by Georges Nzongola-Ntalaja
  • Reformation Christianity: A People's History of Christianity by Peter Matheson and Denis R. Janz
  • Christian Origins: A People's History of Christianity, Vol. 1 by Richard A. Horsley
  • Ancient Christianity: A People's History of Christianity, Vol. 2 by Virginia Burrus
  • The Darker Nations: A People's History of the Third World by Vijay Prashad
  • The English Civil War: A People's History by Diane Purkiss
  • A History of the Swedish People, Vol. 1: From Prehistory to the Renaissance by Vilhelm Moberg
  • A History of the Swedish People, Vol. 2: From Renaissance to Revolution by Vilhelm Moberg

External articles


Genealogy

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From Familypedia

A people's history is a type of historical work which attempts to account for historical events from the perspective of common people.

Contents

Description

A people's history is the history of the world that is the story of mass movements and of the outsiders. Individuals not included in the past in other type of writing about history are part of this theory's primary focus, which includes the disenfranchised, the oppressed, the poor, the nonconformists, and the otherwise forgotten people. This theory also usually focuses on events occurring in the fullness of time, or when an overwhelming wave of smaller events cause certain developments to occur.

This revisionist approach to writing history is in opposition to methods which tend to emphasize single great figures in history, referred to as the Great man theory.

See also

General
Labor struggles and strikers, Eugene V. Debs and the Socialist Party of America, Antiwar movements, Poor whites
Things
Bill of Rights, Universal suffrage, affirmative action, Collective bargaining, Patriotism, Democracy, National interest
Other
Leftist, Multicultural, Anti-imperialist, Pentagon papers, Espionage Act, Ruth and David Greenglass, Ron Kovic

Further reading

External articles

This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at People's history. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
Facts about People's historyRDF feed

This article uses material from the "People's history" article on the Genealogy wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

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