The Full Wiki

People detained by the International Criminal Court: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

People detained by the International Criminal Court (ICC) are held in the ICC's detention centre, which is located within a Dutch prison in Scheveningen, The Hague. The ICC was established in 2002 as a permanent tribunal to prosecute individuals for genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and the crime of aggression.[1] As of July 2009, it has issued public arrest warrants for thirteen individuals, four of whom are currently in custody of the court.

The ICC detention centre is for holding people who have been charged with crimes, not for imprisoning convicted criminals.[2] As such, all detainees are considered innocent until their guilt has been proven.[2] Upon conviction by the ICC, criminals are transferred outside the Netherlands to serve their sentences.[2]

Contents

Detention centre

ICC detention centre
Scheveningen prison complex
Location Scheveningen, The Hague
Coordinates 52°06′38″N 4°18′05″E / 52.11061°N 4.301469°E / 52.11061; 4.301469
Capacity 12
Opened 2006
Managed by The ICC registrar

The ICC currently has twelve detention cells in a Dutch prison in Scheveningen, The Hague.[3] Suspects held by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia are held in the same prison and share some facilities, like the fitness room, but have no contact with suspects held by the ICC.[3]

The ICC registrar is responsible for managing the detention centre.[4] The rules governing detainment are contained in Chapter 6 of the Regulations of the Court[4] and Chapter 5 of the Regulations of the Registry.[5] The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) has unrestricted access to the detention centre.[6]

Advertisements

Facilities

Each individual has his own toilet and washing area.[7] They have access to a small gym and are offered training with a physical education instructor.[7]

Detainees are provided with meals, but they may also cook for themselves, purchase food from the prison shop, and have ingredients ordered in.[2][8] However, Charles Taylor's lawyers have complained that "the food which is served is completely eurocentric and not palatable to the African palate".[8]

Each detainee has a personal computer in his cell, on which he can view material related to their case.[2] They are offered computer training, if required,[2] and language courses.[7]

Detainees' rights

Detainees are allowed to communicate in private with their defence teams and diplomatic representatives of their countries of origin.[2] They are permitted visits from family members, wives and partners, and spiritual advisors.[2]

List of detainees

The following table lists all the people who have been held at the ICC detention centre since it was established in 2006. The first person ever detained by the court was Thomas Lubanga, who arrived at the detention centre on March 17, 2006.[9]

As of July 2009, the detention centre houses five suspects, including former Liberian President Charles Taylor. Taylor is being tried under the mandate and auspices of the Special Court for Sierra Leone, but his trial is being held at the ICC's facilities in The Hague because of political and security concerns about holding the trial in Freetown.[8][10]

Name Arrived Departed Notes
LubangaThomas Lubanga 2006-03-17March 17, 2006[9]
TaylorCharles Taylor 2006-06-20June 20, 2006[11] Tried by the Special Court for Sierra Leone but detained at the ICC detention centre.[11]
KatangaGermain Katanga 2007-10-17October 17, 2007[12]
Ngudjolo ChuiMathieu Ngudjolo Chui 2008-02-07February 7, 2008[13]
BembaJean-Pierre Bemba 2008-07-03July 3, 2008[14]

See also

Notes and references

  1. ^ United Nations Department of Public Information (December 2002). The International Criminal Court. Retrieved on July 7, 2008.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h International Criminal Court (2007). ICC Detention CentrePDF. Retrieved on July 7, 2008.
  3. ^ a b Emma Thomasson (February 28, 2006). ICC says cells ready for Uganda war crimes suspects. Reuters. Retrieved on July 7, 2008.
  4. ^ a b International Criminal Court (May 26, 2004). Regulations of the CourtPDF, Chapter 6. Retrieved on July 7, 2008.
  5. ^ International Criminal Court (September 25, 2006). Regulations of the RegistryPDF, Chapter 5. Retrieved on July 7, 2008.
  6. ^ International Criminal Court (March 29, 2006). Agreement between the International Criminal Court and the International Committee of the Red Cross on Visits to Persons deprived of Liberty Pursuant to the Jurisdiction of the International Criminal CourtPDF, Article 4. Retrieved on July 7, 2008.
  7. ^ a b c International Criminal Court (April 2006). FAQ about detention put to Terry Jackson, Chief Custody Officer of the ICC. ICC Newsletter No. 7. Retrieved on July 7, 2008.
  8. ^ a b c Alexandra Hudson (May 31, 2007). Warlord Taylor's home is lonely Dutch prison. Reuters. Retrieved on July 7, 2008.
  9. ^ a b International Criminal Court (March 17, 2006). First arrest for the International Criminal Court. Retrieved on July 7, 2008.
  10. ^ BBC News (June 20, 2006). Q&A: Trying Charles Taylor. Retrieved on July 7, 2008.
  11. ^ a b International Criminal Court (June 21, 2006). The Special Court for Sierra Leone to use ICC Facilities for Trial of Charles Taylor. Retrieved on July 9, 2008.
  12. ^ International Criminal Court (October 18, 2007). Second arrest: Germain Katanga transferred into the custody of the ICC. Retrieved on July 9, 2008.
  13. ^ International Criminal Court (February 7, 2008). Third detainee for the International Criminal Court: Mathieu Ngudjolo Chui. Retrieved on July 9, 2008.
  14. ^ International Criminal Court (July 3, 2008). Surrender of Jean-Pierre Bemba to the International Criminal Court. Retrieved on July 9, 2008.

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message