Perch: Wikis

  
  
  

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Perch
Yellow perch (Perca flavescens)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Superclass: Osteichthyes
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Perciformes
Family: Percidae
Genus: Perca
Linnaeus, 1758
Species

Perca is the genus and species of fish referred to as perch or, sometimes, yellow perch, a group of freshwater fish belonging to the family Percidae. Perch, of which there are three species in different geographical areas, lend their name to a large order of vertebrates: the Perciformes, from the Greek perke meaning perch, and the Latin forma meaning shape.

Perch have "rough" or ctenoid scales. On the anterior side of the head are the maxilla and lower mandible for the mouth, a pair of nostrils, and two lidless eyes. On the posterior sides are the opercula, which are used to protect the gills. Also there is the lateral line system which is sensitive to vibrations in the water. They have a pair of pectoral and pelvic fins. On the anterior end of the fish, there are two dorsal fins. The first one is spiny and the second is soft. There is also an anal fin, which is also considered spiny, and a caudal fin. Also there is a cloacal opening right behind the anal fin. All perciform fish share the perch's general morphology.

The type species for this genus is the European perch.

Contents

Perch as a food fish

Perch are a popular panfish and are considered to be very good eating; the commercial catch for them has always been in high demand. This has also led to considerable misuse of the term "perch" in the restaurant business in the United States, such as "ocean perch" (Rosefish) and "rock perch" (a small bass). Many restaurants will strive to correctly advertise the offering as "yellow lake perch", or the slightly more ambiguous "lake perch". "White perch", though similarly popular, is a completely different species of panfish common in New England, and not a member of the family Percidae.

Angling

They can be caught with a variety of methods, but the two best methods are perhaps float fishing and lure fishing. Spinners work exceptionally well. When fishing with a float, the angler will want to have a disgorger when fishing; Perch are notorious for swallowing the hook, and will need aid of a disgorger or forceps for unhooking. In many parts of the world they are also a favorite species among ice fishermen. They will take a variety of baits, including minnows, worms, maggots, bread and softshell crayfish.

Perch grow to around 5 lb (2.3 kg) or more, but the most common fish to be caught are around 1 lb (0.45 kg) or less, and anything over 2 lb (0.91 kg) is considered a prize catch.

Species

Most authorities recognize three species of perch:

  • The European perch (Perca fluviatilis) is found in florida and california. It is usually dark green with red fins. The European perch has been successfully introduced in New Zealand and Australia where it is known as the redfin perch or English perch. In Australia they have bred into larger specimens.
  • The Golden Perch (Macquaria ambigua), native to Australia. Usually found west of the Great Dividing Range through the Murray Darling river system. Grows up to 2 kg (4.4 lb) and 40 cm (16 in).
  • The Silver Perch (Bidyanus bidyanus), native to Australia. Usually found in the Murray River though have been recorded north in the Darling River. Slightly larger than the Golden Perch.
  • The Spangled Perch (Leiopotherapon unicolor), found throughout Australian waters, from pure freshwater to sea water though they spend most their life in fresh water. Considerably smaller than the Silver Perch and Golden Perch, grows up the 500 g (18 oz) and 30 cm (12 in).

For other perch not in the Perca genus, see Perch (disambiguation).

References

  • Gilberson, Lance, Zooslogy Lab Manual 4th edition. Primis Custom Publishing. 1999.

1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

PERCH (through Fr. perche from Lat. pertica, a pole or rod used for measurement), a bar or rod used for various purposes, as .e.g. for a navigation mark in shallow waters, for a support on which a bird may rest, or for a pole which joins the back with the fore part of a wagon or other four-wheeled vehicle. As a term of linear measurement, "perch," also "rod" or "pole," =162 ft., 52 yds.; of superficial area, =304 sq. yds.; 160 perches acre. As a stonemason's measure, a "perch" =1 linear perch in length by 12 ft. in breadth and 1 ft. in thickness.


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Simple English

Perch
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Perciformes
Family: Percidae
Genus: Perca
Linnaeus, 1758

Perch is a type of fish. Perch are the fish in the genus Perca.

Perch have "rough" scales. When looking through a microscope, the scales look like a plate with growth rings and spikes on the top edges. On the top side of the fish, there is a mouth, a pair of nostrils, and two lidless eyes. On the bottom sides are the operculum, which are used to protect the gills. Also perch have a lateral line system, which a set of sense organs that are sensitive to vibrations in the water. They have a pair of pectoral and pelvic fins. On the front end of the fish, there are two dorsal fins. The first one is spiny and the second is soft. There is also an anal fin, which is also considered spiny, and a caudal fin.








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