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Percy Bysshe Shelley

Born 4 August 1792(1792-08-04)
Field Place, Horsham, England[1]
Died 8 July 1822 (aged 29)
Viareggio, Grand Duchy of Tuscany
Occupation Poet, Dramatist, Essayist, Novelist
Literary movement Romanticism
Signature
.Percy Bysshe Shelley (4 August 1792 – 8 July 1822; pronounced /ˈpɜrsi ˈbɪʃ ˈʃɛli/)[2] was one of the major English Romantic poets and is critically regarded among the finest lyric poets in the English language.^ Defence of poetry [by] Percy Bysshe Shelley.

^ Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley, with his life.

^ Cenci, by Percy Bysshe Shelley; ed.

.Shelley was famous for his association with John Keats and Lord Byron.^ Last links with Byron, Shelley, and Keats.

^ Liberal was concerted by Byron and Shelley, the latter being principally interested in it with a view to benefiting Leigh Hunt- by such an association with Byron .
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^ When Shelley visited Lord Byron at Ravenna, the latter had suggested his coming out, together with the plan of a periodical work in which they should all join.
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The novelist Mary Shelley was his second wife.
.He is most famous for such classic anthology verse works as Ozymandias, Ode to the West Wind, To a Skylark, and The Masque of Anarchy, which are among the most popular and critically acclaimed poems in the English language.^ It was on a beautiful summer evening, while wandering among the lanes whose myrtle-hedges were the bowers of the fire-flies, that we heard the carolling of the skylark which inspired one of the most beautiful of his poems.
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^ Taken altogether, they are the most perfect specimens of descriptive prose in the English language; never over-charged with colour, vibrating with emotions excited by the stimulating scenes of Italy, frank in their criticism, and exquisitely delicate in observation.
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^ In the Cascine outside Florence he also composed the "Ode to the West Wind", the most symmetrically perfect as well as the most impassioned of his minor lyrics.
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.His major works, however, are long visionary poems which included Alastor, Adonaïs, The Revolt of Islam, and the unfinished work The Triumph of Life.^ Though he was producing a long series of imperishable poems, he did not take much interest in his work.
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^ Shelley, in her note on the "Revolt of Islam", confirms this account of his Bible studies; and indeed the influence of the Old Testament upon his style may be traced in several of his poems.
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^ (See Mrs. Shelley's note on the Revolt of Islam, and the whole Preface to the Prose Works.
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.The Cenci (1819) and Prometheus Unbound (1820) were dramatic plays in five and four acts respectively.^ [Composed at Leghorn, 1820, and published with “Prometheus Unbound” in the same year.
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^ In the spring of 1819 the Shelleys settled in Rome, where the poet proceeded with the composition of "Prometheus Unbound".
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^ TO A SKYLARK. [Composed at Leghorn, 1820, and published with "Prometheus Unbound" in the same year.
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He wrote the Gothic novels Zastrozzi (1810) and St. Irvyne (1811) and the short works The Assassins (1814) and The Coliseum (1817).
.Shelley's unconventional life and uncompromising idealism, combined with his strong disapproving voice, made him an authoritative and much-denigrated figure during his life and afterward.^ Later on in life, Shelley outgrew this preoccupation with his idealized self, and directed his genius to more objective themes.
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^ Shelley had not yet made Byron's acquaintance, though he had sent him a copy of "Queen Mab", with a letter, which miscarried in the post.
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^ His voice was soft and low, but broken in its tones,--when anything much interested him, harsh and immodulated; and this peculiarity he never lost.
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.Shelley never lived to see the extent of his success and influence.^ The influence of Byron upon Shelley, as he more than once acknowledged, and as his wife plainly perceived, was, to a great extent, depressing.
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Some of his works were published, but they were often suppressed upon publication. .Up until his death, with approximately 50 readers as his audience, it is said he made no more than 40 pounds from his writings.^ It will be seen that, whatever Shelley may from time to time have said about the immortality of the soul, he was no materialist, and no believer in the extinction of the spiritual element by death.
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^ I would much rather read a book normally or play something that did more with the story than just light it up.
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^ "In no individual perhaps was the moral sense ever more completely developed than in Shelley; in no being was the perception of right and of wrong more acute.
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He became an idol of the next three or even four generations of poets, including the important Victorian and Pre-Raphaelite poets. He was admired by Karl Marx, George Bernard Shaw, Bertrand Russell, Isadora Duncan[3] and Jiddu Krishnamurti ("Shelley is as sacred as the Bible.")[4] Henry David Thoreau's civil disobedience and Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi's passive resistance were influenced and inspired by Shelley's nonviolence in protest and political action.[5]

Contents

Life

Education

.A son of Sir Timothy Shelley, a Whig Member of Parliament, and his wife, a Sussex landowner, Shelley was born at Field Place in Broadbridge Heath, near Horsham, England.^ On this day Percy Bysshe Shelley was born at Field Place, near Horsham, in the county of Sussex.
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^ From Leghorn the Shelleys removed in the autumn to Florence, where, on the 12th of November, the present Sir Percy Florence Shelley was born.
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^ On their return to England in September, Shelley took a cottage at Great Marlow on the Thames, in order to be near his friend Peacock.
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He was the eldest of 7 children with 5 sisters and one brother. He received his early education at home, tutored by Reverend Evan Edwards of Warnham. .His cousin and lifelong friend Thomas Medwin, who lived nearby recounted his early childhood in his "The Life of Percy Bysshe Shelley". It was a happy and contented childhood spent largely on country pursuits such as fishing and hunting.^ Defence of poetry [by] Percy Bysshe Shelley.

^ Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley, with his life.

^ Cenci, by Percy Bysshe Shelley; ed.

[6]
In 1802, he entered the Syon House Academy of Brentford. .In 1804, Shelley entered Eton College, where he fared poorly, subjected to an almost daily mob torment his classmates called "Shelley-baits". Surrounded, the young Shelley would have his books torn from his hands and his clothes pulled at and torn until he cried out madly in his high-pitched "cracked soprano" of a voice.^ His voice was wanting in richness and suavity—high-pitched, and tending to the screechy; his See also: GENERAL GENERAL (Lat.
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^ There is a considerable mass of convergent testimony to the fact that Shelley's voice was high pitched, and that when he became excited, he raised it to a scream.
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^ Williams saw my embarrassment, and to relieve me asked Shelley what book he had in his hand?
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[7]
.On 10 April 1810, he matriculated at University College, Oxford.^ In the Michaelmas Term of 1810 Shelley was matriculated as a Commoner of University College, Oxford; and very soon after his arrival he made the acquaintance of a man who was destined to play a prominent part in his subsequent history, and to bequeath to posterity the most brilliant, if not in all respects the most trustworthy, record of his marvellous youth.
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.Legend has it that Shelley attended only one lecture while at Oxford, but frequently read sixteen hours a day.^ Only one was to be found at all suitable; however, a trifle such as not finding a house could not stop Shelley; the one found was to serve for all.
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^ We have only to read Shelley's "Essay on Christianity", in order to perceive what reverent admiration he felt for Jesus, and how profoundly he understood the true character of his teaching.
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^ Full half an hour, to-day, I tried my lot With various flowers, and every one still said, 'She loves me--loves me not.'
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.His first publication was a Gothic novel, Zastrozzi (1810), in which he vented his atheistic worldview through the villain Zastrozzi.^ We are also told that he spend the 40 pounds gained by his first novel, "Zastrozzi," on a farewell supper to eight school-boy friends.
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.In the same year, Shelley, together with his sister Elizabeth, published Original Poetry by Victor and Cazire.^ Speculations on morals and metaphysics, A defence of poetry, Ode to Naples, The witch of Atlas, Epipsychidion, and Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley's The fields of fancy/Mathilda, together with minor .

^ [Composed at Leghorn, 1820, and published with “Prometheus Unbound” in the same year.
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^ TO A SKYLARK. [Composed at Leghorn, 1820, and published with "Prometheus Unbound" in the same year.
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.While at Oxford, he issued a collection of verses (perhaps ostensibly burlesque but quite subversive), Posthumous Fragments of Margaret Nicholson, with Thomas Jefferson Hogg.^ Thomas Jefferson Hogg was unlike Shelley in temperament and tastes.
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^ Such was the genesis of "Posthumous Fragments of Margaret Nicholson", edited by John Fitz Victor.
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In 1811, Shelley published his second Gothic novel St. Irvyne; or, The Rosicrucian and a pamphlet called The Necessity of Atheism. .This gained the attention of the university administration and he was called to appear before the College's fellows, including the Dean, George Rowley.^ A copy of this syllabus reached a Fellow of another college, who made the Master of the University acquainted with the fact.
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.His refusal to repudiate the authorship of the pamphlet resulted in his being sent down from Oxford on 25 March 1811, along with Hogg.^ On the morning of March 25, 1811, Shelley was sent for to the Senior Common Room, and asked whether he acknowledged himself to be the author of the obnoxious pamphlet.
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.The rediscovery in mid-2006 of Shelley's long-lost 'Poetical Essay on the Existing State of Things', a long, strident anti-monarchical and anti-war poem printed in 1811 in London by Crosby and Company as "by a gentleman of the University of Oxford", gives a new dimension to the expulsion, reinforcing Hogg's implication of political motives ('an affair of party').^ At the beginning of this century the learning and the manners of Oxford dons were at a low ebb; and the Fellows of University College acted harshly but not altogether unjustly, ignorantly but after their own kind, in this matter of Shelley's expulsion.
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^ TO CONSTANTIA. [Dated 1817 by Mrs. Shelley, and printed by her in the "Poetical Works", 1839, 1st edition.
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^ ON FANNY GODWIN. [Published by Mrs. Shelley, among the poems of 1817, in "Poetical Works", 1839, 1st edition.
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[8] .Shelley was given the choice to be reinstated after his father intervened, on the condition that he would have had to recant his avowed views.^ Shelley frequently carried pistols with him upon these occasions, and would stop to fix his father's franks upon convenient trees and shoot at them.
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His refusal to do so led to a falling-out with his father.

Marriage

.Four months after being expelled, the 19-year-old Shelley eloped to Scotland with the 16-year-old schoolgirl Harriet Westbrook to get married.^ Harriet was naturally drawn to the Westbrook extremity, and Shelley to the Boinville.
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^ Eliza Westbrook took a strong dislike to her; Harriet followed suit; and Shelley himself found that he had liked her better at a distance than in close companionship.
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^ In the year 1818-19 the Shelleys had no friends at all in Italy, except Lord Byron at Venice, and Mr. Mrs.
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.After their marriage on 28 August 1811, Shelley invited his college friend Hogg to share their household.^ Shelley at Oxford : the early correspondence of P.B. Shelley with his friend T.J. Hogg, together with letters of Mary Shelley and T.L. Peacock and a hitherto unpublished prose fragment by Shelley / edited by Walter Sidney Scott.

^ Shelley asked his friend what he thought of them, and Hogg answered that it might be possible by a little alteration to turn them into capital burlesques.
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^ But no investigation on the spot could throw any clear light on the circumstance, and Shelley's friends, Hogg, Peacock, and Mr. Madocks, concurred in regarding the affair as a delusion.
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When Harriet objected, however, Shelley brought her to Keswick in England's Lake District, intending to write. Distracted by political events, he visited Ireland shortly afterward in order to engage in radical pamphleteering. .Here he wrote his Address to the Irish People and was seen at several nationalist rallies.^ Address to the Irish people / by Percy Bysshe Shelley.

^ Before a week had passed, the "Address to the Irish People" had been printed.
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^ Armed with the manuscript of his "Address to the Irish People" (It was published in Dublin.
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His activities earned him the unfavourable attention of the British government.
.Unhappy in his nearly three-year-old marriage, Shelley often left his wife and child (Ianthe Shelley, 1813–76) alone, first to study Italian with a certain Cornelia Turner, and eventually to visit William Godwin's home and bookshop in London.^ The first was Shelley's marriage with Mary Godwin on the 30th of December, 1816.
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^ A month had not elapsed before Hogg left him in order to begin his own law studies at York; and Shelley abode "alone in the vine-trellised chamber, where he was to remain, a bright-eyed, restless fox amidst sour grapes, not, as his poetic imagination at first suggested, for ever, but a little while longer."
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^ In the autumn of this year Shelley paid Lord Byron a visit at Ravenna, where he made acquaintance with the Countess Guiccoli.
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.There he met and fell in love with Godwin's eldest daughter, named after her mother Mary Wollstonecraft, the author of A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, among others.^ Gisborne had been a friend of Mary Wollstonecraft and Godwin.
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^ While divided in this way between a home which had become distasteful to him, and a house where he found scope for his most romantic outpourings of sensibility, Shelley fell suddenly and passionately in love with Godwin's daughter, Mary.
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^ William, the eldest son of Shelley and Mary Godwin, was born on the 24th of January, 1816.
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.On 28 July 1814, Shelley abandoned his pregnant wife and child when he ran away with Mary, then also 16, inviting her stepsister Claire Clairmont along for company.^ In 1818 the Shelleys—always nearly with Miss Clairmont in their See also: COMPANY company —were in See also: MILAN MILAN (Ital.
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^ The distance of time between June, 1814, and November, 1816, and the new ties formed by Harriet in this interval, prove that there was no immediate connexion between Shelley's abandonment of his wife and her suicide.
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^ The upshot came on the 28th of July, when Shelley aided Mary to elope from her father's house, Claire Clairmont deciding to accompany them .
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.The three sailed to Europe, crossed France, and settled in Switzerland, an account of which was subsequently published by the Shelleys.^ Account of Shelley's visits to France, Switzerland, and Savoy, in the years 1814 and 1816, : with extracts from "The history of a six weeks' tour" and "Letters descriptive of a sail round a lake of Geneva and of the glaciers of Chamouni," first published .

^ They crossed to See also: CALAIS Calais , and proceeded across See also: FRANCE FRANCE, ANATOLE (1844– ) France into See also: SWITZERLAND Switzerland .
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^ Undeterred by this adverse criticism, Shelley subsequently offered "The Wandering Jew" to two publishers, Messrs.
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.After six weeks, homesick and destitute, the three young people returned to England.^ The three young people returned to London in September .
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^ Five Happy Weeks (English) (as Author) Holiday Stories for Young People (English) (as Editor) Sangster, Margaret E. (Margaret Elizabeth), 1894-1981 .
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.In late 1815, while living close to London with Mary and avoiding creditors, he wrote Alastor, or The Spirit of Solitude. It attracted little attention at the time, but has now come to be recognized as his first major achievement.^ Alastor, or, The spirit of solitude : and other poems.

^ Shelley and Mary (who was naturally always called Mrs Shelley) now settled at Bishopgate, near Windsor Forest; here he produced his first excellent poem, 4lastor, or the Spirit of Solitude, which was published soon after-wards with a few others .
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^ Alastor : or, The spirit of solitude, and other poems / by Percy Bysshe Shelley; a facsimile reprint of the original edition first published in 1816 edited by Bertram Dobell.

.At this point in his writing career, Shelley was deeply influenced by the poetry of Wordsworth.^ English romantic poetry; ethos, structure, and symbol in Coleridge, Wordsworth, Shelley, and Keats.

^ De Quincey, though he writes ambiguously upon this point, does not seem to have met Shelley.
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Byron

.In mid-1816, Shelley and Mary made a second trip to Switzerland.^ William, the eldest son of Shelley and Mary Godwin, was born on the 24th of January, 1816.
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^ The first was Shelley's marriage with Mary Godwin on the 30th of December, 1816.
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.They were prompted to do so by Mary's stepsister Claire Clairmont, who had commenced a liaison with Lord Byron the previous April just before his self-exile on the continent.^ When Shelley visited Lord Byron at Ravenna, the latter had suggested his coming out, together with the plan of a periodical work in which they should all join.
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^ Those of you who want to download any Etext before announcement can get to them as follows, and just download by date.
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^ This fact has to be mentioned by Shelley's biographer, because Allegra afterwards became an inmate of his home; and though he and Mary were ignorant of what was passing at Geneva, they did not withdraw their sympathy from the mother of Lord Byron's daughter.
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.Byron had lost interest in her and so she used the opportunity of meeting the Shelleys to act as bait to lure him to Geneva.^ Shelley, whose interest in the poor people around him was always keen and practical, lost no time in making their acquaintance at Tremadoc.
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^ The negotiations which had preceded Hunt's visit to Italy, raised forebodings in Shelley's mind as to the reception he would meet from Byron; nor were these destined to be unfulfilled.
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^ His voice was soft and low, but broken in its tones,--when anything much interested him, harsh and immodulated; and this peculiarity he never lost.
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.The Shelleys and Byron rented neighbouring houses on the shores of Lake Geneva.^ He spent the summer on the shores of the Lake of Geneva.
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^ In July the Shelleys took a house at Bracknell near See also: WINDSOR WINDSOR (properly NEw WINDSOR) Windsor See also: FOREST Forest , where they had congenial neighbours, Mrs Boinville and her family .
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

^ Whether or not they knew of it while they and Claire were in daily intercourse with Byron, and housed close by him on the See also: SHORE shore of the See also: LAKE LAKE, GERARD LAKE, 1ST VISCOUNT (1744-1808) Lake of Geneva, may be left unargued .
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

Regular conversation with Byron had an invigorating effect on Shelley's output of poetry. .While on a boating tour the two took together, Shelley was inspired to write his Hymn to Intellectual Beauty, often considered his first significant production since Alastor[citation needed].^ The character of Shelley can be considered according to two different See also: STANDARDS standards of estimation .
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

^ The "Hymn to Intellectual Beauty" was conceived during his voyage round the lake with Lord Byron.
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^ Instead of remaining true to the conception of Beauty expressed in the "Hymn," Shelley "sought through the world the One whom he may love."
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.A tour of Chamonix in the French Alps inspired Mont Blanc, a poem in which Shelley claims to have pondered questions of historical inevitability and the relationship between the human mind and external nature.^ I have trodden the glaciers of the Alps, and lived under the eye of Mont Blanc.
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^ "Mont Blanc" was inspired by a view of that mountain and its surrounding peaks and valleys, as he lingered on the Bridge of Arve on his way through the Valley of Chamouni.
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^ Vindication of natural diet : being one in a series of notes to Queen Mab : (a philosophical poem) / by Percy Bysshe Shelley.

Second marriage

.After the Shelleys returned to England, Fanny Imlay, Mary's half-sister and Claire's stepsister, travelled from Godwin's household in London to kill herself in Wales in early October.^ Accordingly he left London, and travelled by coach to Lynmouth, where he found that the Shelleys had flitted a few days previously without giving any notice.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 1/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Miss Shelley speaks of a play written by her brother and her sister Elizabeth, which was sent to Matthews the comedian, and courteously returned as unfit for acting.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 1/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ ON FANNY GODWIN. [Published by Mrs. Shelley, among the poems of 1817, in "Poetical Works", 1839, 1st edition.
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.In December 1816, Shelley's estranged wife Harriet drowned herself in the Serpentine in Hyde Park, London.^ The return of the Shelleys was closely followed by two suicides —first that of Fanny Wollstonecraft (already referred to), and second that of Harriet Shelley, who on the 9th of November drowned herself in the See also: SERPENTINE Serpentine .
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

^ She subsequently formed another connexion which proved unhappy; and on the 10th of November, 1816, she committed suicide by drowning herself in the Serpentine.
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^ The distance of time between June, 1814, and November, 1816, and the new ties formed by Harriet in this interval, prove that there was no immediate connexion between Shelley's abandonment of his wife and her suicide.
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.On 30 December 1816, a few weeks after Harriet's body was recovered, Shelley and Mary Godwin were married.^ The first was Shelley's marriage with Mary Godwin on the 30th of December, 1816.
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^ On the 28th of July Shelley left London with Mary Godwin, who up to this date had remained beneath her father's roof.
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^ Shelley library : a catalogue of printed books, manuscripts and autograph letters by Percy Bysshe Shelley, Harriet Shelley and Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley / collected by Thomas James Wise.

.The marriage was intended, in part, to help secure Shelley's custody of his children by Harriet, but the plan failed: the courts gave custody of the children to foster parents due to the fact that he was an atheist.^ Soon after her withdrawal to Bath, Harriet gave birth to Shelley's second child, Charles Bysshe, who died in 1826.
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^ Harriet did not take much to her little girl, and gave her over to a wet-nurse, for whom Shelley conceived a great dislike.
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^ The children were placed in the hands of a clergyman, to be educated in accordance with principles diametrically opposed to their parent's, while Shelley's income was mulcted in a sum of 200 pounds for their maintenance.
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.The Shelleys took up residence in the village of Marlow, Buckinghamshire, where a friend of Percy's, Thomas Love Peacock, lived.^ Peacock, Thomas Love, 1785-1866.

^ The Four ages of poettry [by] Thomas Love Peacock.

^ On their return to England in September, Shelley took a cottage at Great Marlow on the Thames, in order to be near his friend Peacock.
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.Shelley took part in the literary circle that surrounded Leigh Hunt, and during this period he met John Keats.^ Shelley hurried at once to London, and found some consolation in the society of Leigh Hunt.
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^ Leigh Hunt's letter on Hogg's Life of Shelley : with other papers.

^ Liberal was concerted by Byron and Shelley, the latter being principally interested in it with a view to benefiting Leigh Hunt- by such an association with Byron .
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

.Shelley's major production during this time was Laon and Cythna; or, The Revolution of the Golden City, a long narrative poem in which he attacked religion and featured a pair of incestuous lovers.^ I have spoken of this poem under its first name of "Laon and Cythna".
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^ If "Alastor" had expressed one side of Shelley's nature, his devotion to Ideal Beauty, "Laon and Cythna" was in a far profounder sense representative of its author.
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^ In the first edition of the poem he made Laon and Cythna brother and sister, not because he believed in the desirability of incest, but because he wished to throw a glove down to society, and to attack the intolerance of custom in its stronghold.
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It was hastily withdrawn after only a few copies were published. It was later edited and reissued as The Revolt of Islam in 1818. Shelley wrote two revolutionary political tracts under the nom de plume, "The Hermit of Marlow."

Italy

.Early in 1818, the Shelleys and Claire left England in order to take Claire's daughter, Allegra, to her father Byron, who had taken up residence in Venice.^ Allegra was soon sent on to See also: VENICE VENICE (continued) VENICE (Venezia) Venice , to her father, who, ever since parting from Miss Clairmont in Switzer-land, showed a callous and unfeeling determination to see and know no more about her .
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

^ In May 1816 the pair left England for Switzerland, together with Miss Clairmont, and their own See also: INFANT (in early forms enfaunt, enfant, through the Fr.
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

^ Toward midnight on the 18th of July, Byron recited the lines in "Christabel" about the lady's breast; when Shelley suddenly started up, shrieked, and fled from the room.
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.Contact with the older and more established poet encouraged Shelley to write once again.^ From the more universal and philosophical aspects of his theme, the poet once more turns to the special subject that had stirred him.
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^ The influence of Byron upon Shelley, as he more than once acknowledged, and as his wife plainly perceived, was, to a great extent, depressing.
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^ There is much in the "Adonais" which seems now more applicable to Shelley himself than to the young and gifted poet whom he mourned.
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.During the latter part of the year, he wrote Julian and Maddalo, a lightly disguised rendering of his boat trips and conversations with Byron in Venice, finishing with a visit to a madhouse.^ NOTE ON POEMS OF 1816, BY MRS. SHELLEY. Shelley wrote little during this year.
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^ When Shelley visited Lord Byron at Ravenna, the latter had suggested his coming out, together with the plan of a periodical work in which they should all join.
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^ The lives of Byron and Shelley during the next six years were destined to be curiously blent.
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.This poem marked the appearance of Shelley's "urbane style". He then began the long verse drama Prometheus Unbound, a re-writing of the lost play by the ancient Greek poet Aeschylus, which features talking mountains and a petulant spirit who overthrows Jupiter.^ Newton among poets; Shelley's use of science in Prometheus unbound.

^ In the spring of 1819 the Shelleys settled in Rome, where the poet proceeded with the composition of "Prometheus Unbound".
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^ Prometheus unbound : a lyrical drama in four acts / mit einleitung und kommentar, von Richard Ackermann.

Tragedy struck in 1818 and 1819, when his son Will died of fever in Rome, and his infant daughter Clara Everina died during yet another household move.
.A daughter, Elena Adelaide Shelley, was born on 27 December 1818 in Naples, Italy and registered there as the daughter of Shelley and a woman named Marina Padurin.^ Cazire stands for some one; probably it is meant to represent a woman's name, and that woman may have been either Elizabeth Shelley or Harriet Grove.
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^ In the year 1818-19 the Shelleys had no friends at all in Italy, except Lord Byron at Venice, and Mr. Mrs.
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^ Hogg and Shelley (Hogg is there named first) were expelled for " contumaciously refusing to answer questions," and for " repeatedly declining to disavow " the authorship .
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

However, the identity of the mother is an unsolved mystery. .Some scholars speculate that her true mother was actually Claire Clairmont or Elise Foggi, a nursemaid for the Shelley family.^ Shelley spent his last guinea on the trip; but though the ladies of his family enjoyed the honour of some days passed in ducal hospitalities, the visit was not fruitful of results.
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^ The upshot came on the 28th of July, when Shelley aided Mary to elope from her father's house, Claire Clairmont deciding to accompany them .
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

^ There was some secrecy in their departure, because they were accompanied by Miss Clairmont, whose mother disapproved of her forming a third in the party.
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.Other scholars postulate that she was a foundling Shelley adopted in hopes of distracting Mary after the deaths of William and Clara.^ William, the eldest son of Shelley and Mary Godwin, was born on the 24th of January, 1816.
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^ Together with relation of the death of the family of the Cenci / translated by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley ; edited by Betty T. Bennett.

[9] .Shelley referred to Elena in letters as his "Neapolitan ward". However, Elena was placed with foster parents a few days after her birth and the Shelley family moved on to yet another Italian city, leaving her behind.^ Shelley spent his last guinea on the trip; but though the ladies of his family enjoyed the honour of some days passed in ducal hospitalities, the visit was not fruitful of results.
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^ Hogg was obliged to leave that city, in order to resume his law studies at York, and Shelley's programme of life at this period imperatively required the society of his chosen comrade.
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^ That Shelley early in 1814 had no intention of leaving his wife, is probable; for he was re-married to her on the 24th of March, eight days after his impassioned letter to Hogg, in St. George's, Hanover Square.
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Elena died 17 months later, on 10 June 1820.
.The Shelleys moved around various Italian cities during these years.^ The lives of Byron and Shelley during the next six years were destined to be curiously blent.
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^ We spent the latter part of the year 1819 in Florence, where Shelley passed several hours daily in the Gallery, and made various notes on its ancient works of art.
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In later 1818 they were living in a pensione on the Via Valfonde (which now runs alongside Florence train station). The pensione was destroyed in World War II but there is a plaque on the building which replaced it. .Here, they received two visitors, a Miss Sophia Stacey and her much older travelling companion, Miss Corbet Parry-Jones (to be described by Mary as 'an ignorant little Welshwoman').^ TO SOPHIA [MISS STACEY].
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^ CANCELLED STANZA. ODE TO HEAVEN. ODE TO THE WEST WIND. AN EXHORTATION. THE INDIAN SERENADE. CANCELLED PASSAGE. TO SOPHIA [MISS STACEY].
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Sophia had for three years in her youth been ward of the poet's aunt and uncle. Hitting it off the pair moved into the same pensione and stayed for about two months. .During this period Mary gave birth to her son and Sophia is credited with suggesting that he be named after the city of his birth, so he became Percy Florence Shelley, later Sir Percy.^ Shelley, Percy Florence, Sir, bart.

^ From Leghorn the Shelleys removed in the autumn to Florence, where, on the 12th of November, the present Sir Percy Florence Shelley was born.
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^ The same principles guided Shelley at a still later period.
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.Shelley also wrote his 'Ode to Sophia Stacey' now in all complete collections of his work.^ Volume 04 (English) (as Commentator) The works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes.
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^ Complete poetical works of Percy Bysshe Shelley; the text newly collated and revised and edited with a memoir and notes by George Edward Woodberry.

^ When Shelley visited Lord Byron at Ravenna, the latter had suggested his coming out, together with the plan of a periodical work in which they should all join.
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.Shelley completed Prometheus Unbound in Rome, and he spent mid-1819 writing a tragedy, The Cenci, in Livorno.^ In the spring of 1819 the Shelleys settled in Rome, where the poet proceeded with the composition of "Prometheus Unbound".
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^ Cenci : a tragedy in five acts / by Percy Bysshe Shelley, given from the poet's own editions, with an introduction by Alfred Forman and H. Buxton Forman and a prologue by John Todhunter.

^ It has been said that Shelley, as a landscape painter, is decidedly Turneresque; and there is much in "Prometheus Unbound" to justify this opinion.
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.In this year, prompted among other causes by the Peterloo massacre, he wrote his best-known political poems: The Masque of Anarchy and Men of England. These were most likely his most-remembered works during the 19th century.^ Besides "The Cenci" and "Prometheus Unbound", of which it yet remains to speak, this year saw the production of several political and satirical poems--the "Masque of Anarchy", suggested by the news of the Peterloo massacre, being by far the most important.
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^ Not only did he write the best lyrics, but the best tragedy, the best translations, and the best familiar poems of his century.
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^ Masque of anarchy : a poem / by Percy Bysshe Shelley ; now first published, with a preface by Leigh Hunt.

.Around this time period, he wrote the essay The Philosophical View of Reform, which was his most thorough exposition of his political views to that date.^ He read for the first time, this year, Montaigne's "Essays", and regarded them ever after as one of the most delightful and instructive books in the world.
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.In 1820, hearing of John Keats' illness from a friend, Shelley wrote him a letter inviting him to join him at his residence at Pisa.^ RESIDENCE AT PISA. On the 26th of January, 1820, the Shelley's established themselves at Pisa.
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^ The final settlement of the Shelleys at Pisa seems to have been determined by the fact that the water of that place agreed with him.
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^ The climate, however, disagreed with him, and in the month of January, 1820, they took up their abode at Pisa.
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.Keats replied with hopes of seeing him, but instead, arrangements were made for Keats to travel to Rome with the artist Joseph Severn.^ But you Will see him, and will like him too, I hope, With the milk-white Snowdownian antelope Match'd with this camelopard.
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.Inspired by the death of Keats, in 1821 Shelley wrote the elegy Adonais.^ Adonais : an elegy on the death of John Keats / by Percy Bysshe Shelley.

^ Adonais, : an elegy on the death of John Keats, author of Endymion, Hyperion etc.

^ The news of Keats's death at Rome on the 27th of December, 1820, and the erroneous belief that it had been accelerated, if not caused, by a contemptible review of "Endymion" in the "Quarterly", stirred Shelley to the composition of "Adonais".
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.In 1822, Shelley arranged for Leigh Hunt, the British poet and editor who had been one of his chief supporters in England, to come to Italy with his family.^ Shelley hurried at once to London, and found some consolation in the society of Leigh Hunt.
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^ Shelley states that the change from England to Italy was in all respects beneficial to her husband.
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^ Leigh Hunt's letter on Hogg's Life of Shelley : with other papers.

.He meant for the three of them — himself, Byron and Hunt — to create a journal, which would be called The Liberal.^ Liberal was concerted by Byron and Shelley, the latter being principally interested in it with a view to benefiting Leigh Hunt- by such an association with Byron .
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

^ It was then settled that Byron, who had formed the project of starting a journal to be called "The Liberal" in concert with Leigh Hunt, should himself settle in Pisa.
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^ The negotiations which had preceded Hunt's visit to Italy, raised forebodings in Shelley's mind as to the reception he would meet from Byron; nor were these destined to be unfulfilled.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

.With Hunt as editor, their controversial writings would be disseminated, and the journal would act as a counter-blast to conservative periodicals such as Blackwood's Magazine and The Quarterly Review.^ One looks back with unspeakable regret and gnawing remorse to such periods; fancying that, had one been more alive to the nature of his feelings, and more attentive to soothe them, such would not have existed.
  • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ English and American reviews, magazines, journals, and new publications of the day ...

Leigh Hunt's son, the editor Thornton Leigh Hunt, when later asked whether he preferred Shelley or Byron as a man, replied:-
."On one occasion I had to fetch or take to Byron some copy for the paper which my father, himself and Shelley, jointly conducted.^ In the second Shelley found himself obliged to take an expensive journey to London, in the fruitless attempt to come to some terms with his father's lawyer, Mr. Whitton.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 1/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Shelley had already done a good deal of boating with Williams on the Arno and the Serchio, and had on one occasion nearly lost his life by the capsizing of their tiny craft.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Shelley had not yet made Byron's acquaintance, though he had sent him a copy of "Queen Mab", with a letter, which miscarried in the post.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

I found him seated on a lounge feasting himself from a drum of figs. .He asked me if I would like a fig.^ If your state is not listed and you would like to know if we have added it since the list you have, just ask.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]
  • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

Now, in that, Leno, consists the difference, Shelley would have handed me the drum and allowed me to help myself."
[10]

Death

Shelley's grave in Rome
.On 8 July 1822, less than a month before his 30th birthday, Shelley drowned in a sudden storm while sailing back from Livorno to Lerici in his schooner, Don Juan.^ The " Don Juan " had by this time made Via Reggio; she was not to be seen, though other vessels which had sailed about the same time were still discernible .
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

^ On the night following that day of rest, Shelley took a postchaise for Leghorn; and early in the afternoon of the next day he set sail, with Williams, on his return voyage to Lerici.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Before long she acquired another name than Portia in the Shelley household, and now she is better known as the "Brown Demon."
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

.Shelley claimed to have met his Doppelgänger, foreboding his own death.^ Timothy Shelley was anxious to bind his erratic son down to a settlement of the estates, which, on his own death, would pass into the poet's absolute control.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

.He was returning from having set up The Liberal with the newly arrived Leigh Hunt.^ After doing his best to set things going comfortably between Byron and Hunt, Shelley returned on See also: BOARD (O. Eng.
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

^ Liberal was concerted by Byron and Shelley, the latter being principally interested in it with a view to benefiting Leigh Hunt- by such an association with Byron .
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

^ The Leigh Hunts arrived at last in Genoa, whence they again sailed for Leghorn.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

.The name "Don Juan", a compliment to Byron, was chosen by Edward John Trelawny, a member of the Shelley-Byron Pisan circle.^ Byron, Shelley, and their Pisan circle.

^ Trelawny, Edward John, 1792-1881.

^ Shelley acquired two nick-names in the circle of his Pisan friends, both highly descriptive.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

.However, according to Mary Shelley's testimony, Shelley changed it to "Ariel". This annoyed Byron, who forced the painting of the words "Don Juan" on the mainsail.^ Williams overruled his objections, and the "Don Juan" was built according to his cherished fancy.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ This word-portrait corresponds in its main details to the descriptions furnished by other biographers, who had the privilege of Shelley's friendship.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ On the 28th of July Shelley left London with Mary Godwin, who up to this date had remained beneath her father's roof.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

.This offended the Shelleys, who felt that the boat was made to look much like a coal barge.^ It did not last more than twenty minutes; and at its end Trelawny looked out anxiously for Shelley's boat.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Shelley and I walked to Lerici, and made a stretch off the land to try her: and I find she fetches whatever she looks at.
  • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Probably Shelley was attracted to the lake country as much by the celebrated men who lived there, as by the beauty of its scenery, and the cheapness of its accommodation.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

.The vessel, an open boat, was custom-built in Genoa for Shelley.^ Shelley's was to be an open boat carrying sail, Byron's a large decked schooner.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

.It did not capsize but sank; Mary Shelley declared in her "Note on Poems of 1822" (1839) that the design had a defect and that the boat was never seaworthy.^ Note on Poems of 1820, by Mrs. Shelley.
  • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

^ NOTE ON POEMS OF 1816, BY MRS. SHELLEY. Shelley wrote little during this year.
  • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Shelley had already done a good deal of boating with Williams on the Arno and the Serchio, and had on one occasion nearly lost his life by the capsizing of their tiny craft.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

In fact the boat was seaworthy, the sinking was due to the storm and poor seamanship of the three on board.[11]
.There were those who believed his death was not accidental.^ Of all the beauty and the terror there-- A woman's countenance, with serpent-locks, Gazing in death on Heaven from those wet rocks.
  • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Death is the veil which those who live call life; they sleep, and it is lifted."
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

.Some said that Shelley was depressed in those days and that he wanted to die; others that he did not know how to navigate; others believed that some pirates mistook the boat for Byron's and attacked him, and others have even more fantastical stories.^ The influence of Byron upon Shelley, as he more than once acknowledged, and as his wife plainly perceived, was, to a great extent, depressing.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Byron described him as "bold as a lion;" and indeed it may here be said, once and for all, that Shelley's physical courage was only equalled by his moral fearlessness.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ At Eton Shelley was not popular either with his teachers or his elder school-fellows, although the boys of his own age are said to have adored him.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

[11][12] .There is a mass of evidence, though scattered and contradictory, that Shelley may have been murdered for political reasons.^ There is a considerable mass of convergent testimony to the fact that Shelley's voice was high pitched, and that when he became excited, he raised it to a scream.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ There is no proof that Shelley, though eloquent in conversation, was a powerful public speaker.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

.Previously, at his cottage in Tann-yr-allt in Wales, he had been surprised and apparently attacked by a man who may have been an intelligence agent.^ He gave it to the world as a composition of a man who had "died at Florence, as he was preparing for a voyage to one of the Sporades," and he requested Ollier not to circulate it, except among a few intelligent readers.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The friendship extended to him by that excellent man at this season of his trouble may perhaps count for something with those who are inclined to judge him harshly.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The Shelleys were now established at Tan-yr-allt, near Tremadoc, in North Wales, on an estate belonging to Mr. W.A. Madocks, M.P. for Boston.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

[13]
The Funeral of Shelley by Louis Edouard Fournier (1889); pictured in the centre are, from left, Trelawny, Hunt and Byron
In the days before he died, he was almost shot on two separate occasions.[citation needed] A British consul defended the shooter from the first of these two incidents, keeping him from all legal consequence.
.Two other Englishmen were with Shelley on the boat.^ The Shelleys occupied two rooms facing each other; the Williamses had one of the remaining chambers, and Trelawny another.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ They spent a pleasant day or two together, Shelley showing the Campo Santo and other sights of Pisa to his English friend.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

.One was a retired Navy officer, Edward Ellerker Williams; the other was a boatboy, Charles Vivien.^ His favourite companion, Edward Ellerker Williams, of the 8th Light Dragoons, had begun his life in the navy, and had afterwards entered the army; he had spent several years in India, and his love for adventure and manly exercises accorded with Shelley's taste.
  • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

[14] The boat was found ten miles (16 km) offshore, and it was suggested that one side of the boat had been rammed and staved in by a much stronger vessel. However, the liferaft was unused and still attached to the boat. The bodies were found completely clothed, including boots.
.In his 'Recollections of the Last Days of Shelley and Byron', Trelawny noted that the shirt that Williams's body was clad in was 'partly drawn over the head, as if the wearer had been in the act of taking it off [...] and [he was missing] one boot, indicating also that he had attempted to strip.'^ Last links with Byron, Shelley, and Keats.

^ Recollections of the last days of Shelley and Byron.

^ Shelley spent his last guinea on the trip; but though the ladies of his family enjoyed the honour of some days passed in ducal hospitalities, the visit was not fruitful of results.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

.Trelawny also relates a supposed deathbed confession by an Italian fisherman who claimed to have rammed Shelley's boat in order to rob him, a plan confounded by the rapid sinking of the vessel.^ After a few months he became the neighbour of Lord Byron, who engaged the Palazzo Lanfranchi it order to be near him; and here many English and Italian friends gathered round them.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The impression, therefore, made on him by Shelley has to be gravely estimated by all who still incline to treat the poet as a pathological specimen of humanity.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ A passage from Shelley's letter of June 18, 1822, expresses the plain prose of his relation to the Williamses:--"They are people who are very pleasing to me.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

.Shelley's body washed ashore and later, in keeping with quarantine regulations, was cremated on the beach near Viareggio.^ What remains to be said concerning the cremation of Shelley's body on the 6th of August, must be told in Trelawny's own words.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

The day after the news of his death reached England the Tory newspaper The Courier gloated: "Shelley, the writer of some infidel poetry, has been drowned, now he knows whether there is a God or not."[15] A reclining statue of Shelley's body, depicting him washed up onto the shore, created by sculptor Edward Onslow Ford at the behest of Shelley's daughter-in-law, Lady Jane Shelley, is the centerpiece of the Shelley Memorial at University College, Oxford. An 1889 painting by Louis Edouard Fournier, The Funeral of Shelley (also known as The Cremation of Shelley), contains inaccuracies. In pre-Victorian times it was English custom that women not attend funerals for health reasons. .Mary Shelley did not attend but was featured in the painting, kneeling at the left-hand side.^ On the 28th of July Shelley left London with Mary Godwin, who up to this date had remained beneath her father's roof.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

.Leigh Hunt stayed in the carriage during the ceremony but is also pictured.^ "In the meantime Byron and Leigh Hunt arrived in the carriage, attended by soldiers, and the Health Officer, as before.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

.Also, Trelawney, in his account of the recovery of Shelley's body, records that "the face and hands, and parts of the body not protected by the dress, were fleshless," and by the time that the party returned to the beach for the cremation, the body was even further decomposed.^ What remains to be said concerning the cremation of Shelley's body on the 6th of August, must be told in Trelawny's own words.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

In his graphic account of the cremation, he writes of Byron being unable to face the scene, and withdrawing to the beach.
.Shelley's heart was snatched from the funeral pyre by Edward Trelawny; Mary Shelley kept it for the rest of her life, and it was later buried with the body of Sir Percy Florence Shelley, their son.^ Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley, with his life.

^ Shelley, Percy Florence, Sir, bart.

^ From Leghorn the Shelleys removed in the autumn to Florence, where, on the 12th of November, the present Sir Percy Florence Shelley was born.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

[16][17] .Shelley's ashes were interred in the Protestant Cemetery, Rome under an ancient pyramid in the city walls.^ "The English burying-place is a green slope near the walls, under the pyramidal tomb of Cestius, and is, I think, the most beautiful and solemn cemetery I ever beheld.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ William was buried in the Protestant cemetery, of which Shelley had written a description to Peacock in the previous December.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ His ashes were carried by Trelawny to Rome and buried in the Protestant cemetery, so touchingly described by him in his letter to Peacock, and afterwards so sublimely in "Adonais".
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

His grave bears the Latin inscription, Cor Cordium ("Heart of Hearts"), and, in reference to his death at sea, a few lines of "Ariel's Song" from Shakespeare's The Tempest: "Nothing of him that doth fade / But doth suffer a sea-change / Into something rich and strange." The grave site is the second in the cemetery. .Some weeks after Shelley had been put to rest, Trelawny had come to Rome, had not liked his friend's position among a number of other graves, and had purchased what seemed to him a better plot near the old wall.^ He was habited like a boy, in a black jacket and trousers, which he seemed to have outgrown, or his tailor, as is the custom, had most shamefully stinted him in his 'sizings.'
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Like a sister and a brother Living in the same lone home, Many years--we must live some Hours or ages yet to come.
  • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In the second Shelley found himself obliged to take an expensive journey to London, in the fruitless attempt to come to some terms with his father's lawyer, Mr. Whitton.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

The ashes were exhumed and moved to their present location. .Trelawny had purchased the adjacent plot, and over sixty years later his remains were placed there.^ In another place Hogg gives some details which complete the impression of Shelley's personal appearance, and which are fully corroborated by Trelawny's recollections of a later date.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

.Shelley was eventually memorialized at the Poets’ Corner at Westminster Abbey, along with his old friends, Lord Byron and John Keats.^ Last links with Byron, Shelley, and Keats.

^ Cenci : a tragedy in five acts / by Percy Bysshe Shelley, given from the poet's own editions, with an introduction by Alfred Forman and H. Buxton Forman and a prologue by John Todhunter.

^ When Shelley visited Lord Byron at Ravenna, the latter had suggested his coming out, together with the plan of a periodical work in which they should all join.
  • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

Family history

Ancestry

Shelley was a seventeenth generation descendant of Richard Fitzalan, 10th Earl of Arundel, through his son John Fitzalan, Marshall of England (d. 1379). John was married to Baroness Eleanor Maltravers (1345 – 10 January 1404/1405). Their eldest son succeeded them as John FitzAlan, 2nd Baron Arundel (1365–1391). He was himself married to Elizabeth le Despenser (d. 1 April/ 10 April 1408).
Elizabeth was a great-granddaughter of Hugh the younger Despenser by his second son Edward Despenser of Buckland (d. 30 September 1342). Her parents were Sir Edward Despenser, 1st Lord Despenser (24 March 1336–11 November 1375) and Elizabeth Burghersh (d. 26 July 1409).
The eldest son of Elizabeth by Baron Maltravers was John Fitzalan, 13th Earl of Arundel. Their third son was Sir Thomas Fitzalan of Beechwood. His own daughter Eleanor Fitzalan was married to Sir Thomas Browne of Beechworth Castle. .They had four sons and one daughter, Katherine Browne, who in 1471 married Humphrey Sackville of Buckhurst (1426–24 January 1488).^ At one birth these four were born With the world's forgotten morn, And from Pleasure still they hold _45 All it circles, as of old.
  • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Four daughters, Elizabeth, Mary, Hellen, and Margaret, and one son, John, who died in the year 1866, were the subsequent issue of Mr. Timothy Shelley's marriage.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Your sons, your wives, your brethren, were they; Who said they were slain on the battle day?
  • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

Their oldest son Richard Sackville of Buckhurst (1472–18 July 1524) was married in 1492 to Isabel Dyggs. Their oldest son Sir John Sackville of Buckhurst (1492 – 5 October 1557) was married to Margaret Boleyn. Margaret was a sister to Thomas Boleyn, 1st Earl of Wiltshire. His younger brother Richard Sackville had a less prominent marriage which resulted in the birth of Anne Sackville. Anne herself was later married to Henry Shelley.
Henry became father to a younger Henry Shelley. This younger Henry had at least three sons. The youngest of them Richard Shelley was later married to Joan Fuste, daughter of John Fuste from Ichingfield. .Their grandson John Shelley of Fen Place was married himself to Helen Bysshe, daughter of Roger Bysshe.^ Letters of Percy Bysshe Shelley; collected and edited by Roger Ingpen.

^ Cenci : a tragedy in five acts / by Percy Bysshe Shelley, given from the poet's own editions, with an introduction by Alfred Forman and H. Buxton Forman and a prologue by John Todhunter.

^ Rosalind and Helen : a modern eclogue : with other poems / by Percy Bysshe Shelley.

.Their son Timothy Shelley of Fen Place (born c.^ His father, named Timothy, was the eldest son of Bysshe Shelley, Esquire, of Goring Castle, in the same county.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ William, the eldest son of Shelley and Mary Godwin, was born on the 24th of January, 1816.
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^ Timothy Shelley was anxious to bind his erratic son down to a settlement of the estates, which, on his own death, would pass into the poet's absolute control.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

1700) married widow Johanna Plum from New York City. Timothy and Johanna were the great-grandparents of Percy.

Family

.Percy was born to Sir Timothy Shelley (7 September 1753 – 24 April 1844) and his wife Elizabeth Pilfold following their marriage in October 1791. His father was son and heir to Sir Bysshe Shelley, 1st Baronet of Castle Goring (21 June 1731 – 6 January 1815) by his wife Mary Catherine Michell (d.^ Defence of poetry [by] Percy Bysshe Shelley.

^ Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley, with his life.

^ Cenci, by Percy Bysshe Shelley; ed.

7 November 1760). His mother was daughter of Charles Pilfold of Effingham. Through his paternal grandmother Percy was great-grandson to Reverend Theobald Michell of Horsham.
He was the eldest of seven children. His younger siblings were:
.
  • John Shelley of Avington House (15 March 1806 – 11 November 1866; married on 24 March 1827 Elizabeth Bowen (d.^ Four daughters, Elizabeth, Mary, Hellen, and Margaret, and one son, John, who died in the year 1866, were the subsequent issue of Mr. Timothy Shelley's marriage.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    .28 November 1889)
  • Mary Shelley (not his wife, née Godwin)
  • Elizabeth Shelley (d.^ On the 28th of July Shelley left London with Mary Godwin, who up to this date had remained beneath her father's roof.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ William, the eldest son of Shelley and Mary Godwin, was born on the 24th of January, 1816.
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    ^ The intrusion of Eliza disturbed the harmony of Shelley's circle; but it is possible that there were deeper reasons for the abrupt departure which he made from York with his wife and her sister in November, 1811.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    1831)
  • Hellen Shelley (d. 10 May 1885)
  • Margaret Shelley (d. 9 July 1887)
.Shelley's uncle, brother to his mother Elizabeth Pilfold, was Captain John Pilfold, a famous Naval Commander that served under Admiral Nelson during the Battle of Trafalgar.^ Miss Shelley speaks of a play written by her brother and her sister Elizabeth, which was sent to Matthews the comedian, and courteously returned as unfit for acting.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ His uncle, Captain Pilfold of Cuckfield, was instrumental in effecting this partial reconciliation.
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[18]

Descendants

.Three children survived Shelley: Ianthe and Charles, his daughter and son by Harriet; and Percy Florence, his son by Mary.^ Shelley, Percy Florence, Sir, bart.

^ From Leghorn the Shelleys removed in the autumn to Florence, where, on the 12th of November, the present Sir Percy Florence Shelley was born.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Hellas, Shelley's research notes for "Charles the First," and drafts for several lyrics : a facsimile edition / Percy Bysshe Shelley ; with full transcript .

.Charles, who suffered from tuberculosis, died in 1826 after being struck by lightning during a rain storm.^ Soon after her withdrawal to Bath, Harriet gave birth to Shelley's second child, Charles Bysshe, who died in 1826.
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.Percy Florence, who eventually inherited the baronetcy in 1844, died without children.^ He gave it to the world as a composition of a man who had "died at Florence, as he was preparing for a voyage to one of the Sporades," and he requested Ollier not to circulate it, except among a few intelligent readers.
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^ What men gain fairly--that they should possess, And children may inherit idleness, From him who earns it--This is understood; Private injustice may be general good.
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The only lineal descendants of the poet are therefore the children of Ianthe.
Ianthe Eliza Shelley was married in 1837 to Edward Jeffries Esdaile of Cothelstone Manor. The marriage resulted in the birth of two sons and a daughter. Ianthe died in 1876.
.Shelley's son Percy Florence Shelley, and his wife Jane, adopted Jane's niece Bessie Florence Gibson.^ Shelley, Percy Florence, Sir, bart.

^ From Leghorn the Shelleys removed in the autumn to Florence, where, on the 12th of November, the present Sir Percy Florence Shelley was born.
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^ In the year 1815, upon the death of his father, he succeeded to the baronetcy, which passed, after his own death, to his grandson, the present Sir Percy Florence Shelley, as the poet's only surviving son.
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Bessie married Leopold James Yorke Campbell Scarlett, and so the Scarletts (later the Scarlett/Abingers after their son, Shelley Leopold Laurence Scarlett, succeeded his second cousin to become the fifth Baron Abinger in 1903) became heirs to the Shelleys. .Several members of the Scarlett family were born at Percy Florence's seaside home 'Boscombe Manor', in Bournemouth.^ From Leghorn the Shelleys removed in the autumn to Florence, where, on the 12th of November, the present Sir Percy Florence Shelley was born.
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.The 1891 census shows Lady Shelley living at Boscombe Manor with several great nephews.^ It may incidentally be pointed out that this story, credited as true by Lady Shelley in her Memorials, shows how early an estrangement had begun between the poet and his father.
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Idealism

.Shelley's unconventional life and uncompromising idealism, combined with his strong disapproving voice, made him an authoritative and much-denigrated figure during his life and afterward.^ Later on in life, Shelley outgrew this preoccupation with his idealized self, and directed his genius to more objective themes.
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^ Shelley had not yet made Byron's acquaintance, though he had sent him a copy of "Queen Mab", with a letter, which miscarried in the post.
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^ His voice was soft and low, but broken in its tones,--when anything much interested him, harsh and immodulated; and this peculiarity he never lost.
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He became an idol of the next two or three or even four generations of poets, including the important Victorian and Pre-Raphaelite poets Robert Browning, Alfred Lord Tennyson, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Algernon Charles Swinburne, as well as Lord Byron, Henry David Thoreau, William Butler Yeats, and Edna St. Vincent Millay, and poets in other languages such as Jan Kasprowicz, Jibanananda Das and Subramanya Bharathy.

Nonviolence

Henry David Thoreau's civil disobedience and Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi's passive resistance were influenced and inspired by Shelley's nonviolence in protest and political action.[19] .It is known that Gandhi would often quote Shelley's Masque of Anarchy.^ Masque of anarchy : a poem / by Percy Bysshe Shelley ; now first published, with a preface by Leigh Hunt.

^ Masque of anarchy : a poem / by Percy Bysshe Shelley.

[20], which has been called "perhaps the first modern statement of the principle of nonviolent resistance."[21]

Vegetarianism

Shelley wrote several essays on the subject, the most prominent of which being "A Vindication of Natural Diet" and "On the Vegetable System of Diet".
Shelley, in heartfelt dedication to sentient beings, wrote: "If the use of animal food be, in consequence, subversive to the peace of human society, how unwarrantable is the injustice and the barbarity which is exercised toward these miserable victims. .They are called into existence by human artifice that they may drag out a short and miserable existence of slavery and disease, that their bodies may be mutilated, their social feelings outraged.^ It is urged that they ought to have proceeded by the legal method of calling witnesses; and that the sentence was not only out of all proportion to the offence, but that it ought not to have been executed till persuasion had been tried.
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.It were much better that a sentient being should never have existed, than that it should have existed only to endure unmitigated misery"; "Never again may blood of bird or beast/ Stain with its venomous stream a human feast,/ To the pure skies in accusation steaming"; and "It is only by softening and disguising dead flesh by culinary preparation that it is rendered susceptible of mastication or digestion, and that the sight of its bloody juices and raw horror does not excite intolerable loathing and disgust."^ The dwelling-place Of insects, beasts, and birds, becomes its spoil; _115 Their food and their retreat for ever gone, So much of life and joy is lost.
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^ "I am disgusted with writing," he once said, "and were it not for an irresistible impulse, that predominates my better reason, should discontinue so doing."
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^ To them we may trace not only the swiftness of his imaginative flight, but also his frequent satisfaction with the somewhat less than perfect in artistic execution.
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.Shelley was a strong advocate for social justice for the 'lower classes'. He witnessed many of the same mistreatments occurring in the domestication and slaughtering of animals, and he became a fighter for the rights of all living creatures that he saw being treated unjustly.^ Like a sister and a brother Living in the same lone home, Many years--we must live some Hours or ages yet to come.
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^ It was entitled "Proposals for an Association", and advocated in serious and temperate phrase the formation of a vast society, binding all the Catholic patriots of Ireland together, for the recovery of their rights.
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^ We saw no house to suit us; but the notion took root, and many circumstances, enchained as by fatality, occurred to urge him to execute it.
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Legacy

Keats-Shelley Memorial House, Spanish Steps, Rome
.Shelley's mainstream following did not develop until a generation after his passing, unlike Lord Byron, who was popular among all classes during his lifetime despite his radical views.^ And all that did then attend and follow, .
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^ Byron described him as "bold as a lion;" and indeed it may here be said, once and for all, that Shelley's physical courage was only equalled by his moral fearlessness.
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^ When Shelley visited Lord Byron at Ravenna, the latter had suggested his coming out, together with the plan of a periodical work in which they should all join.
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.For decades after his death, Shelley was mainly only appreciated by the major Victorian poets, the pre-Raphaelites, the socialists and the labour movement.^ Yet this must be attempted; for Shelley is the only English poet who has successfully handled that most difficult of metres, terza rima.
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^ Timothy Shelley was anxious to bind his erratic son down to a settlement of the estates, which, on his own death, would pass into the poet's absolute control.
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^ In the year 1815, upon the death of his father, he succeeded to the baronetcy, which passed, after his own death, to his grandson, the present Sir Percy Florence Shelley, as the poet's only surviving son.
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One reason for this was the extreme discomfort with Shelley's political radicalism which led popular anthologists to confine Shelley's reputation to the relatively sanitised 'magazine' pieces such as 'Ozymandias' or 'Lines to an Indian Air'.
He was admired by Mahatma Gandhi, Alfred Nobel, C. S. Lewis,[22] Karl Marx, Henry Stephens Salt, George Bernard Shaw, Bertrand Russell, Isadora Duncan,[23] Jiddu Krishnamurti ("Shelley is as sacred as the Bible."),[24] Upton Sinclair[25] and William Butler Yeats.[26] .Ralph Vaughan Williams, Sergei Rachmaninoff, Roger Quilter, John Vanderslice and Samuel Barber composed music based on his poems.^ Love's philosophy / words by Shelly [sic] ; music by Roger Quilter.

^ Music for a scene from Shelley : for orchestra, opus 7 / Samuel Barber.

.Critics such as Matthew Arnold endeavoured to rewrite Shelley's legacy to make him seem a lyricist and a dilettante who had no serious intellectual position and whose longer poems were not worth study.^ Shelley's earnestness and just criticism held him captive."
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^ Shelley, whose interest in the poor people around him was always keen and practical, lost no time in making their acquaintance at Tremadoc.
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^ From Dr. Lind Shelley not only received encouragement to pursue his chemical studies; but he also acquired the habit of corresponding with persons unknown to him, whose opinions he might be anxious to discover or dispute.
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.Matthew Arnold famously described Shelley as a 'beautiful but ineffectual angel'. This position contrasted strongly with the judgement of the previous generation who knew Shelley as a skeptic and radical.^ Probably Shelley was attracted to the lake country as much by the celebrated men who lived there, as by the beauty of its scenery, and the cheapness of its accommodation.
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^ His pecuniary position was precarious, and in a short time he was destined to lose the one friend who had so generously shared his fate.
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^ Shelley's moral qualities are described with no less enthusiasm than his intellectual and physical beauty by the friend from whom I have already drawn so largely.
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.Many of Shelley's works remained unpublished or little known after his death, with longer pieces such as A Philosophical View of Reform existing only in manuscript till the 1920s.^ First included among Shelley's poetical works in Mr. Forman's Library Edition, where a facsimile of the manuscript is given.
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^ A copy exists amongst the Shelley manuscripts at the Bodleian.
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^ When a mother clasps her child, Watch till dusty Death has piled His cold ashes on the clay; She has loved it many a day-- She remains,--it fades away.
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This contributed to the Victorian idea of him as a minor lyricist. .With the inception of formal literary studies in the early twentieth century and the slow rediscovery and re-evaluation of his oeuvre by scholars such as K.N. Cameron, Donald H. Reiman and Harold Bloom, the modern idea of Shelley could not be more different.^ Only one was to be found at all suitable; however, a trifle such as not finding a house could not stop Shelley; the one found was to serve for all.
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.Paul Foot, in his Red Shelley, has documented the pivotal role Shelley's works, especially Queen Mab, have played in the genesis of British radicalism.^ Young Shelley; genesis of a radical.

^ Shelley had not yet made Byron's acquaintance, though he had sent him a copy of "Queen Mab", with a letter, which miscarried in the post.
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^ Queen Mab : a philosophical poem / Percy Bysshe Shelley.

Although Shelley's works were banned from respectable Victorian households, his political writings were pirated by men such as Richard Carlile who regularly went to jail for printing 'seditious and blasphemous libel' (i.e. material proscribed by the government) and these cheap pirate editions reached hundreds of activists and workers throughout the nineteenth century.[27]
.In other countries such as India, Shelley's works both in the original and in translation have influenced poets such as Rabindranath Tagore and Jibanananda Das.^ Banquet of Plato and other pieces : translated and original / by Percy Bysshe Shelley.

^ Alastor : or, The spirit of solitude, and other poems / by Percy Bysshe Shelley; a facsimile reprint of the original edition first published in 1816 edited by Bertram Dobell.

^ Poetical works of Percy Bysshe Shelley / reprinted from the original editions and edited by Richard Herne Shepherd.

.A pirated copy of Prometheus Unbound dated 1835 is said to have been seized in that year by customs at Bombay.^ [Composed at Leghorn, 1820, and published with “Prometheus Unbound” in the same year.
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^ TO A SKYLARK. [Composed at Leghorn, 1820, and published with "Prometheus Unbound" in the same year.
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^ It has been said that Shelley, as a landscape painter, is decidedly Turneresque; and there is much in "Prometheus Unbound" to justify this opinion.
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.The 1970s and 1980s Thames Television sitcom Shelley made many references to the poet.^ The impression, therefore, made on him by Shelley has to be gravely estimated by all who still incline to treat the poet as a pathological specimen of humanity.
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In 2005 the University of Delaware Press published an extensive two-volume biography by James Bieri. .In 2008 the Johns Hopkins University Press published Bieri's 856-page one-volume biography, Percy Bysshe Shelley: A Biography.^ Defence of poetry [by] Percy Bysshe Shelley.

^ Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley, with his life.

^ Cenci, by Percy Bysshe Shelley; ed.

.The rediscovery in mid-2006 of Shelley's long-lost 'Poetical Essay on the Existing State of Things', as noted above and in footnote 6 below, has not been followed up by the work being published or being made generally available on the internet or anywhere else.^ Poetical works of Shelley.

^ Poetical works of Percy Bysshe Shelley.

^ FRAGMENT: LIFE ROUNDED WITH SLEEP. [Published by Mrs. Shelley, "Poetical Works", 1839, 2nd edition.
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At present (November 2009), its whereabouts is not generally known. An analysis of the poem by the only person known to have examined the whole work, appeared in the Times Literary Supplement: H. R. Woudhuysen, "Shelley's Fantastic Prank", 12 July 2006.
.In 2007, John Lauritsen published his book The Man Who Wrote "Frankenstein"[28] in which he argued that Percy Bysshe Shelley's contributions to the novel were much more extensive than had previously been assumed.^ Defence of poetry [by] Percy Bysshe Shelley.

^ Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley, with his life.

^ Cenci, by Percy Bysshe Shelley; ed.

.It has been known and not disputed that Shelley wrote the Preface, although uncredited, and that he contributed at least 4,000 words to the novel.^ A certain interest attaches to it as the first known link between Shelley and William Godwin, for it was composed under the influence of the latter's novel, "St.
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Lauritsen sought to show Shelley's role and contributions in the writing of the novel.

In fiction

.Julian Rathbone's 2002 novel A Very English Agent, about a 19th century government spy Charles Boylan, carries a lengthy section on Shelley's time in Italy, in which Boylan tampers with Shelley's boat on orders from the British government, thus causing his death.^ Place of Shelley among the English poets of his time.

^ "The decision of the cause," he wrote to Mr. Gisborne, "whether or no _I_ am a poet, is removed from the present time to the hour when our posterity shall assemble; but the court is a very severe one, and I fear that the verdict will be, guilty--death."
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^ Shelley's was to be an open boat carrying sail, Byron's a large decked schooner.
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.Rathbone though has stated that he is "a novelist, not a historian" and that his work is very much a piece of fiction.^ Though he was producing a long series of imperishable poems, he did not take much interest in his work.
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.Shelley also features prominently in The Stress of Her Regard, a 1989 novel by Tim Powers which proposes a secret history connecting the English Romantic writers with the mythology of vampires and lamia.^ English romantic poetry; ethos, structure, and symbol in Coleridge, Wordsworth, Shelley, and Keats.

^ No student of English political history before the Reform Bill can regard his apprehensions of a great catastrophe as ill-founded.
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^ From the Beginning to 1800 (English) (as Author) A History of the French Novel, Vol.
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.He also makes an appearance in Jude Morgan's 2005 novel Passion, along with Byron, Keats, Coleridge, Leigh Hunt, and a wealth of other English Romantic figures, though the novel's main focus is the lives of the women behind the famous poets: Lady Caroline Lamb, Augusta Leigh, Mary Shelley, and Fanny Brawne.^ Leigh Hunt's letter on Hogg's Life of Shelley : with other papers.

^ English romantic poetry; ethos, structure, and symbol in Coleridge, Wordsworth, Shelley, and Keats.

^ Last links with Byron, Shelley, and Keats.

.Mary and Percy Shelley also appear in a 2006 novel AngelMonster, by Veronica Bennet.^ Shelley library : a catalogue of printed books, manuscripts and autograph letters by Percy Bysshe Shelley, Harriet Shelley and Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley / collected by Thomas James Wise.

^ Frankenstein, or, The modern Prometheus : the original two-volume novel of 1816-1817 from the Bodleian Library manuscripts / by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley ; with Percy Bysshe Shelley ; edited by Charles E. Robinson.

^ Percy Bysshe Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley / edited by Alan M. Weinberg.

This book is a fictional version of Mary's and Percy's elopement and the series of depressing events.
Shelley appears in Frankenstein Unbound by Brian Aldiss. .The book is a time travel romance featuring Mary Shelley.^ Shelley library : a catalogue of printed books, manuscripts and autograph letters by Percy Bysshe Shelley, Harriet Shelley and Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley / collected by Thomas James Wise.

^ His favourite poets at the time of which I am now writing, were Monk Lewis and Southey; his favourite books in prose were romances by Mrs. Radcliffe and Godwin.
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^ Posthumous poems of Shelley, Mary Shelley's fair copy book: Bodleian MS. Shelley adds.

.A movie was made, based on the novel, directed by Roger Corman and starring John Hurt and Bridget Fonda, in 1990. Shelley makes an appearance in the alternative history novel The Difference Engine by William Gibson and Bruce Sterling.^ A certain interest attaches to it as the first known link between Shelley and William Godwin, for it was composed under the influence of the latter's novel, "St.
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^ The Clarion (English) (as Illustrator) The Dark Star (English) (as Illustrator) The Debtor A Novel (English) (as Illustrator) Stevens, William Oliver, 1878-1955 .
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^ Verse and prose from the manuscripts of Percy Bysshe Shelley; edited by Sir John C.E. Shelley-Rolls, bart., and Roger Ingpen.

.Only referenced in passing by another character, in the novel's story he does not drown in Italy, but lives to become a fierce critic (and perhaps saboteur) of Lord Byron's pro-industrial 'Radical party' government, for which he is arrested, declared insane, and placed in a madhouse.^ Lord Byron and some of his contemporaries : with recollections of the author's life, and of his visit to Italy / by Leigh Hunt.

^ Lord Byron and some of his contemporaries, with recollections of the author's life, and of his visit to Italy.

^ In the year 1818-19 the Shelleys had no friends at all in Italy, except Lord Byron at Venice, and Mr. Mrs.
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Shelley is portrayed as befriending cavalry officer Matthew Hervey while the latter is in Rome with his sister trying to cope with the death of his wife, in the 4th of Allan Mallinson's novels in the Hervey canon, A Call to Arms (2002). .A friendship between Shelley (social subversive, atheist, moral outcast) and Hervey (pattern of martial loyalty and religious rectitude, albeit questioned in his bereavement) seems at first view unlikely.^ The friend in question was a Miss Eliza Hitchener, of Hurstpierpoint, who kept a sort of school, and who had attracted Shelley's favourable notice by her advanced political and religious opinions.
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^ These extracts prove beyond all question that the first contact with the outer world called into activity two of Shelley's strongest moral qualities--his hatred of tyranny and brutal force in any form, and his profound sentiment of friendship.
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^ A certain interest attaches to it as the first known link between Shelley and William Godwin, for it was composed under the influence of the latter's novel, "St.
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.But each sees in the other a good man, and ultimately their agreement, often unspoken, on the travails and truths of the human condition cements the bond between them.^ "Do not inquire if a man be a heretic, if he be a Quaker, a Jew, or a heathen; but if he be a virtuous man, if he loves liberty and truth, if he wish the happiness and peace of human kind.
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.Events in Shelley's and Byron's relationship at the house on Lake Geneva in 1816 have been fictionalized in film three times.^ Byron et Shelley en Suisse et en Savoie Mai-Octobre 1816.

^ Diary of Dr. John William Polidori, 1816, relating to Byron, Shelley, etc.

^ Account of Shelley's visits to France, Switzerland, and Savoy, in the years 1814 and 1816, : with extracts from "The history of a six weeks' tour" and "Letters descriptive of a sail round a lake of Geneva and of the glaciers of Chamouni," first published .

.He plays minor roles in: a 1986 British production, Gothic, directed by Ken Russell, and starring Gabriel Byrne, Julian Sands, and Natasha Richardson; and a 1988 Spanish production, Rowing with the Wind (Remando al viento), starring Lizzie McInnerny as Mary Shelley and Hugh Grant as Lord Byron.^ Speculations on morals and metaphysics, A defence of poetry, Ode to Naples, The witch of Atlas, Epipsychidion, and Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley's The fields of fancy/Mathilda, together with minor .

^ When Shelley visited Lord Byron at Ravenna, the latter had suggested his coming out, together with the plan of a periodical work in which they should all join.
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^ Gothic [videorecording] / Virgin Vision presents a Ken Russell Film ; screenplay by Stephen Volk ; produced by Penny Corke ; directed by Ken Russell.

.Both these movies deal mostly with Mary Shelley's creation of the Frankenstein novel, while Percy tends to be quite a minor character in both films.^ Both of these young ladies, and the "Jew" their father, welcomed Shelley with distinguished kindness.
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.Shelley is the main character in a movie entitled Haunted Summer, made in 1988, starring Laura Dern and Eric Stoltz.^ Send the stars light, but send not love to me, In whom love ever made Health like a heap of embers soon to fade-- *** THE FUGITIVES. [Published by Mrs. Shelley, "Posthumous Poems".
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.Howard Brenton's play, Bloody Poetry, first performed at the Haymarket Theater in Leicester in 1984, concerns itself with the complex relationships and rivalries between Shelley, Mary Shelley, Claire Clairmont, and Byron.^ Speculations on morals and metaphysics, A defence of poetry, Ode to Naples, The witch of Atlas, Epipsychidion, and Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley's The fields of fancy/Mathilda, together with minor .

^ The first is a description of Shelley himself following Byron and Moore--the "Pilgrim of Eternity," and Ierne's "sweetest lyrist of her saddest wrong"--to the couch where Keats lies dead.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ A certain interest attaches to it as the first known link between Shelley and William Godwin, for it was composed under the influence of the latter's novel, "St.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

.Shelley's cremation at Viareggio and the removal of his heart by Trelawny are described in Tennessee Williams' play Camino Real by a fictionalized Lord Byron.^ She was christened by Lord Byron, not wholly with Shelley's approval; and one young English sailor, Charles Vivian, in addition to Williams and Shelley, formed her crew.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ When Shelley visited Lord Byron at Ravenna, the latter had suggested his coming out, together with the plan of a periodical work in which they should all join.
  • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In the autumn of this year Shelley paid Lord Byron a visit at Ravenna, where he made acquaintance with the Countess Guiccoli.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

Percy, Mary and her sister Claire are some of the main characters in the novel, The Vampyre: The Secret History of Lord Byron, by Tom Holland (1995). .The story concerns Lord Byron, poet and friend of Percy Shelley.^ When Shelley visited Lord Byron at Ravenna, the latter had suggested his coming out, together with the plan of a periodical work in which they should all join.
  • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In the autumn of this year Shelley paid Lord Byron a visit at Ravenna, where he made acquaintance with the Countess Guiccoli.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ It may incidentally be pointed out that this story, credited as true by Lady Shelley in her Memorials, shows how early an estrangement had begun between the poet and his father.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

Their meeting and the growth of their friendship are described, along with a hypothetical account of the time the foursome shared in Switzerland. Holland provides a fictional conclusion to the mysteries that surround Shelley's death.
.Shelley's death and his claims of having met a Doppelganger served as inspiration for the 1978 short story "Paper Boat", written by Tanith Lee.^ The not altogether apocryphal story of his having once constructed a boat out of a bank-post-bill, and launched it on the lake in Kensington Gardens, deserves to be alluded to in this connexion.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ When Shelley was on board, he had his papers with him; and much of the "Triumph of Life" was written as he sailed or weltered on that sea which was soon to engulf him.
  • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In short, we have now a perfect plaything for the summer.'--It was thus that short-sighted mortals welcomed Death, he having disguised his grim form in a pleasing mask!
  • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

.Shelley is also the main character in Bulgarian poet Pencho Slaveykov's philosophical poem, Heart of Hearts.^ Queen Mab : a philosophical poem / Percy Bysshe Shelley.

^ Vindication of natural diet : being one in a series of notes to Queen Mab : (a philosophical poem) / by Percy Bysshe Shelley.

^ Queen Mab: a philosophical poem, with notes./ By Percy Bysshe Shelley.

Shelley's Prometheus Unbound is quoted by Captain Jean Luc Picard in Star Trek: The Next Generation, in the episode "Skin of Evil". "A great poet once said, All spirits are enslaved that serve things evil."
Shelley appears as himself in Peter Ackroyd's novel The Casebook of Victor Frankenstein. .In this, Mary Shelley's Victor Frankenstein is portrayed as one of Shelley's close friends during his early life and marriage to Harriet, in an entertaining fictional nod to the doppelganger rumour.^ Mary Shelley's Frankenstein; tracing the myth.

^ Shelley had already done a good deal of boating with Williams on the Arno and the Serchio, and had on one occasion nearly lost his life by the capsizing of their tiny craft.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Shelley library : a catalogue of printed books, manuscripts and autograph letters by Percy Bysshe Shelley, Harriet Shelley and Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley / collected by Thomas James Wise.

.Shelley is also the principal model for Marmion Herbert, one of the two male protagonists in Benjamin Disraeli's novel Venetia (1837); the other protagonist Lord Cadurcis is based on Lord Byron.^ When Shelley visited Lord Byron at Ravenna, the latter had suggested his coming out, together with the plan of a periodical work in which they should all join.
  • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ A transcript by Mrs. Shelley, given to Charles Cowden Clarke, presents one or two variants.
  • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In the autumn of this year Shelley paid Lord Byron a visit at Ravenna, where he made acquaintance with the Countess Guiccoli.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

Shelly's poem, "The Indian Serenade", is recited in Chosen, a House of Night novel by P.C. Cast.
In the 1995 novel "Shelley's Heart" by Charles McCarry, Shelley is the inspiration for a secret society that operates at the highest levels of government and is responsible for stealing a presidential election. The members of the society identify each other with the question and answer: What did Trelawny snatch from the funeral pyre at Viareggio? ¬– Shelley’s heart.
Spoon River Anthology by Edgar Lee Masters mentions Shelley in the poem "Percy Bysshe Shelley"[29] as the namesake of the speaker and that his ashes "were scattered near the pyramid of caius cestius / Somewhere near Rome."

Shelley in music

.Many of Shelley's works have been the bases for musical compositions.^ FRAGMENT: MUSIC AND SWEET POETRY. [Published by Mrs. Shelley, "Poetical Works", 1839, 2nd edition.
  • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

.In 1852, German composer Robert Schumann set Shelley's poem "The Fugitives" (1824) to music, as "Die Flüchtlinge", Op.^ Music for a scene from Shelley : for orchestra : op.

^ [Published by Mrs. Shelley, “Posthumous Poems”, 1824, and dated by her ‘Pisa, 1820.’ There is a fair draft amongst the Shelley manuscripts at the Bodleian Library.
  • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

^ Music, when soft voices die / [music by] David Diamond ; [text by] Percy Bysshe Shelley.

122, no. 2 (1852).
.In 1895, American composer Charles Ives set the Shelley poem "The World's Wanderers" (1824) to music.^ [Published by Mrs. Shelley, “Posthumous Poems”, 1824, and dated by her ‘Pisa, 1820.’ There is a fair draft amongst the Shelley manuscripts at the Bodleian Library.
  • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

^ Bright wanderer, fair coquette of Heaven, To whom alone it has been given To change and be adored for ever, Envy not this dim world, for never But once within its shadow grew _5 One fair as-- *** EPITAPH. [Published by Mrs. Shelley, "Posthumous Poems", 1824.
  • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The epitaph, composed by Hunt, ran thus: "Percy Bysshe Shelley, Cor Cordium, Natus iv.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

In 1902, British composer Sir Granville Bantock wrote a tone poem for orchestra based on the Shelley poem, The Witch of Atlas: Tone Poem for Orchestra No.5 after Shelley, based on The Witch of Atlas (1824), which was first performed on 10 September 1902.
In 1910-11, English composer Sir Edward Elgar wrote a symphony (Symphony No. .2 in E flat major, Op.^ Wikipedia Musical Memories (English) (as Author) On the Execution of Music, and Principally of Ancient Music (English) (as Author) Prelude and Fugue in E-Flat Major, Op.
  • Browse By Author: S - Project Gutenberg 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

.63) inspired by the Shelley poem, "Song" (1821).^ PATER OMNIPOTENS. TO THE MIND OF MAN. NOTE ON POEMS OF 1820, BY MRS SHELLEY. POEMS WRITTEN IN 1821: DIRGE FOR THE YEAR. TO NIGHT. TIME. LINES: 'FAR, FAR AWAY'.
  • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ DIRGE FOR THE YEAR. [Published by Mrs. Shelley, "Posthumous Poems", 1824, and dated January 1, 1821.
  • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Spirit of delight : songs of life, love and death for soprano, baritone and piano on 27 poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley : 1977-1978 / Iain Hamilton.

.On his score of the symphony Elgar wrote the first line of Shelley's first stanza in two different lines, at the bottom of Page 1. The score is now exhibited at the Elgar Birthplace Museum in Broadheath near Worcester, England.^ Amongst the Shelley manuscripts at the Bodleian is a chaotic first draft, from which Mr. Locock ["Examination", etc., 1903, pages 60-62] has, with patient ingenuity, disengaged a first and a second stanza consistent with the metrical scheme of stanzas 3 and 4.
  • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ They sent the manuscript to Thomas Campbell, who returned it with the observation that it contained but two good lines:-- It seemed as if an angel's sigh Had breathed the plaintive symphony.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In the Spring we spent a week or two near Leghorn, borrowing the house of some friends who were absent on a journey to England.
  • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

.American composer Samuel Barber wrote the orchestral work Music for a Scene from Shelley, Op.^ Music for a scene from Shelley : for orchestra : op.

^ Music for a scene from Shelley : for orchestra, opus 7 / Samuel Barber.

^ FRAGMENT: MUSIC AND SWEET POETRY. [Published by Mrs. Shelley, "Poetical Works", 1839, 2nd edition.
  • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

.7, in 1933, after reading Prometheus Unbound (1820).^ [Composed at Leghorn, 1820, and published with “Prometheus Unbound” in the same year.
  • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

^ TO A SKYLARK. [Composed at Leghorn, 1820, and published with "Prometheus Unbound" in the same year.
  • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ THE SENSITIVE PLANT. [Composed at Pisa, early in 1820 (dated 'March, 1820,' in Harvard manuscript), and published, with "Prometheus Unbound", the same year: included in the Harvard College manuscript book.
  • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

The German-born composer Berthold Goldschmidt composed an opera in three acts based on the Shelley play The Cenci in 1949 entitled Beatrice Cenci with a libretto by Martin Esslin "after Shelley's verse drama The Cenci". The opera won first prize in the Festival of Britain opera competition in 1951. The opera was first performed in 1988. The first staged production of Beatrice Cenci in the UK was by the Trinity College of Music on July 9–11, 1998.
.In 1951, British classical composer Havergal Brian composed an opera based on the Shelley play entitled The Cenci, an opera in eight scenes.^ Cenci : opera in eight scenes / by Havergal Brian ; [words by] Shelley ; vocal score.

The opera premiered in 1997 in the UK.
.In 1958, English composer Benjamin Britten published his song cycle Nocturne, Op.60, which featured the song "On a poet's lips", with lyrics by Shelley from Prometheus Unbound.^ [Composed at Leghorn, 1820, and published with “Prometheus Unbound” in the same year.
  • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

^ Place of Shelley among the English poets of his time.

^ Newton among poets; Shelley's use of science in Prometheus unbound.

.In 1971, Beatrix Cenci was premiered, an opera in two acts by Alberto Ginastera to a Spanish libretto by the composer and William Shand, based on the Shelley play.^ Cenci : opera in eight scenes / by Havergal Brian ; [words by] Shelley ; vocal score.

^ Miss Shelley speaks of a play written by her brother and her sister Elizabeth, which was sent to Matthews the comedian, and courteously returned as unfit for acting.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ A certain interest attaches to it as the first known link between Shelley and William Godwin, for it was composed under the influence of the latter's novel, "St.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

.Before an audience estimated at 250,000 to 300,000, Mick Jagger of The Rolling Stones read a part of Adonais at the Brian Jones memorial concert at Hyde Park on 5 July 1969. Jones, founder and guitarist of the Stones, had drowned 3 July 1969 in his swimming pool.^ BEFORE!* YOU USE OR READ THIS ETEXT By using or reading any part of this PROJECT GUTENBERG-tm etext, you indicate that you understand, agree to and accept this "Small Print!"
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ BEFORE!* YOU USE OR READ THIS EBOOK By using or reading any part of this PROJECT GUTENBERG-tm eBook, you indicate that you understand, agree to and accept this "Small Print!"
  • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The last lines of "Adonais" might be read as a prophecy of his own death by drowning.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

.The English rock band The Cure has recorded a song entitled "Adonais" based on the Shelley elegy as a B side single and on the collection Join The Dots: B Sides and Rarities, 1978-2001 (2004).^ A Defence of poetry and drafts for Adonais and other poems in English and Italian) together with Bodleian Ms. Shelley adds.

^ Three manuscript copies are extant: The Trelawny manuscript ("Remembrance"), the Harvard manuscript ("Song") and the Houghton manuscript--the last written by Shelley on a flyleaf of a copy of "Adonais".
  • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Adonais : an elegy on the death of John Keats / by Percy Bysshe Shelley.

"Adonais" was originally the B-side to "The 13th", released in 1996.
American art-rock collective The Pretty Petty Thieves released a limited-edition (only 250 copies ever made available) EP entitled Percy Shelley's Heart in 2006.
The English psychedelic rock band of Arrowe Hill recorded a song called "Cor Cordium (Bysshe Goes to Bel-Air)" based on the death of Shelley, which was included on their fourth LP 'A Few Minutes in the Absolute Elsewhere' in February 2010.

Major works

Short prose works

  • "The Assassins, A Fragment of a Romance" (1814)
  • "The Coliseum, A Fragment" (1817)
  • "The Elysian Fields: A Lucianic Fragment"
  • "Una Favola (A Fable)" (1819, originally in Italian)

Essays

  • Poetical Essay on the Existing State of Things (1811)
  • The Necessity of Atheism (1811)
  • A Defence of Poetry
  • On Love
  • On Life in a Future State
  • On The Punishment of Death
  • Speculations on Metaphysics
  • Speculations on Morals
  • On Christianity
  • On the Literature, the Arts and the Manners of the Athenians
  • On the Symposium, or Preface to The Banquet Of Plato
  • On Friendship

See also

  • Bolesław Prus#Later years (use of Shelley's tomb inscription on Prus's tomb) (Polish)
  • Godwin-Shelley family tree
  • Rising Universe – A water sculpture celebrating the life of Shelley near his birthplace in Horsham Sussex.

Notes

  1. ^ The Life of Percy Bysshe Shelley, Thomas Medwin (London, 1847), p. 323
  2. ^ Bysshe is pronounced as if written bish.
  3. ^ Isadora Duncan, "My Life ", W. W. Norton & Co.,1996, pp. 15, 134.
  4. ^ Arthur H. Nethercot The Last Four Lives of Annie Besant (University of Chicago Press, 1963), p 392n.
  5. ^ Thomas Weber, "Gandhi as Disciple and Mentor," Cambridge University Press, 2004, pp. 28–29
  6. ^ The Life of Percy Bysshe Shelley, Thomas Medwin (London, 1847)
  7. ^ Ian Gilmour, Byron and Shelley: The Making of the Poets, New York: Carol & Graf Publishers, 2002, p.96–97.
  8. ^ India Knight. "Article in the ''Times'' Online". Tls.timesonline.co.uk. http://tls.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,25341-2266779,00.html. Retrieved 2010-03-08. 
  9. ^ Benita Eisler, Byron: Child of Passion, Fool of Fame 1999: p668.
  10. ^ John Bedford Leno. The Aftermath with Autobiography of the Author. London: Reeves & Turner 1892.
  11. ^ a b "The Sinking of the Don Juan" by Donald B. Prell, Keats-Shelley journal, Vol. LVI, 2007, pp 136–154
  12. ^ StClair, William, Trelawny, the Incurable Romancer, New York: The vanguard Press, 1977
  13. ^ Richard Holmes, Shelley: The Pursuit (New York: E.P. Dutton, 1975).
  14. ^ StClair and Prell
  15. ^ Edmund Blunden, Shelley, A Life Story, Oxford University Press, 1965.
  16. ^ Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences 1955 X(1):114-116; doi:10.1093/jhmas/X.1.114-b
  17. ^ "Foxnews.com". Foxnews.com. 2008-07-20. http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,386842,00.html. Retrieved 2010-03-08. 
  18. ^ The Life and Times of Captain John Pilfold, CB,RN; Hawkins, Desmond, Horsham Museum Society, 1998
  19. ^ Thomas Weber, "Gandhi as Disciple and Mentor," Cambridge University Press, 2004, pp. 28–29.
  20. ^ Thomas Weber, "Gandhi as Disciple and Mentor," Cambridge University Press, 2004, pp. 28.
  21. ^ "Morrissociety.org" (PDF). http://www.morrissociety.org/JWMS/SP94.10.4.Nichols.pdf. Retrieved 2010-03-08. 
  22. ^ "Poems of the Week". Themediadrome.com. http://www.themediadrome.com/content/articles/words_articles/poems_shelley.htm. Retrieved 2010-03-08. 
  23. ^ Isadora Duncan, "My Life ", W. W. Norton & Co.,1996, pp. 15, 134.
  24. ^ Arthur H. Nethercot The Last Four Lives of Annie Besant (University of Chicago Press, 1963), p 392n.
  25. ^ Upton Sinclair, "My Lifetime in Letters," Univ of Missouri Press, 1960.
  26. ^ Yeats: The Philosophy of Shelley's Poetry, 1900.
  27. ^ Some details on this can also be found in William St Clair's The Reading Nation in the Romantic Period (Cambridge: CUP, 2005) and Richard D. Altick's The English Common Reader (Ohio: Ohio State University Press, 1998) 2nd. edn.
  28. ^ John Lauritsen (2007). The Man Who Wrote "Frankenstein". Pagan Press. ISBN 0943742145. 
  29. ^ "Percy Bysshe Shelley". Spoon River Anthology. http://spoonriveranthology.net/spoon/river/view/Percy_Bysshe_Shelley. Retrieved 2010-03-08. 
  30. ^ Plato, The Banquet, translated by Percy Bysshe Shelley, Pagan Press, Provincetown 2001, ISBN 0-943742-12-9. Shelley's translation and his introductory essay, "A Discourse on the Manners of the Antient Greeks Relative to the Subject of Love", were first published unbowdlerized in 1931.

References

.
  • James Bieri, Percy Bysshe Shelley: A Biography, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008, ISBN 0-8018-8861-1.
  • Altick, Richard D., The English Common Reader.^ Percy Bysshe Shelley ; edited with an introduction and notes by Tatsuo Tokoo.

    ^ Percy Bysshe Shelley / edited by Donald H. Reiman.

    ^ Beauties of Percy Bysshe Shelley, consisting of miscellaneous selections from his poetical works.

    Ohio: Ohio State University Press, 1998.
  • Holmes, Richard. .Shelley: The Pursuit. New York: E. P. Dutton, 1975.
  • Maurois, André, Ariel ou la vie de Shelley, Paris, Bernard Grasset, 1923
  • St Clair, William.^ A certain interest attaches to it as the first known link between Shelley and William Godwin, for it was composed under the influence of the latter's novel, "St.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Ariel : the life of Shelley / by André Maurois ; translated by Ella D'Arcy.

    ^ Ariel, ou, La vie de Shelley [electronic resource] / A. Maurois.

    .The Godwins and the Shelleys: A Biography of a Family.^ Shelley had more than once urged Godwin and his family to visit him.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    London: Faber and Faber, 1990.
  • St Clair, William. The Reading Nation in the Romantic Period. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005.

External links

.

Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

.
All love is sweet,
Given or returned.
^ Jump to: navigation , search All love is sweet, Given or returned.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

^ All love is sweet, Given or returned.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Unless Love feeds upon its own sweet self, Till it becomes all Music murmurs of.
  • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

Common as light is love,
And its familiar voice wearies not ever.
.Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-08-041822-07-08) was one of the major English romantic poets, widely considered to be among the finest lyric poets in the English language; husband of Mary Shelley.^ Names: Costa Columbus 1935- Percy Bysshe Shelley 1792-1822 .
  • Six about love. For mixed chorus, a cappella (SATB) By King Solomon, Robert Browning, Percy Bysshe Shelley et al, musical setting: Frederick Piket part 2 - song, music - Copyright Info 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.faqs.org [Source type: Reference]

^ Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822.

^ Shelley, Percy Bysshe, · 1792-1822 · Poets, English · 19th century · Biography · Wroe, Ann Availability .

Contents

Sourced

You would not easily guess
All the modes of distress
Which torture the tenants of earth;
And the various evils,
Which like so many devils,
Attend the poor souls from their birth.
  • You would not easily guess
    All the modes of distress
    Which torture the tenants of earth;
    And the various evils,
    Which like so many devils,
    Attend the poor souls from their birth.
  • Cease, cease, wayward Mortal! .I dare not unveil
    The shadows that float o’er Eternity’s vale;
    Nought waits for the good but a spirit of Love,
    That will hail their blest advent to regions above.
    ^ For none than he a purer heart could have, Or that loved good more for itself alone; Of nought in heaven or earth was he the slave.
    • everypoet.com - every poet for everyman, every resource for every poet 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.everypoet.com [Source type: Original source]


    .For Love, Mortal, gleams through the gloom of my sway,
    And the shades which surround me fly fast at its ray.
    ^ For Love, Mortal, gleams through the gloom of my sway, And the shades which surround me fly fast at its ray.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The stars are quenched In darkness, and the pure and spangling snow Gleams faintly through the gloom that gathers round.
    • Queen Mab by Percy Bysshe Shelley 1813 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.marxists.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The deathless stars are bright above ; If I would cross the shade of night, Within my heart is the lamp of love, And that is day !
    • L'astronomie et la poesie : Percy Bysshe Shelley 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC pages.infinit.net [Source type: General]

  • Dar’st thou amid the varied
    To live alone, an isolated thing?
    • "The Solitary" (1810) st. 1
.
Sweet the rose which lives in Heaven,
Although on earth ’tis planted...
  • Not the swart Pariah in some Indian grove,
    Lone, lean, and hunted by his brother’s hate,
    Hath drunk so deep the cup of bitter fate
    As that poor wretch who cannot, cannot love:
    He bears a load which nothing can remove,
    A killing, withering weight.^ An hundred ages we had been kept Cradled in visions of hate and care, And each one who waked as his brother slept Found the truth -- SEMICHORUS II .
    • L'astronomie et la poesie : Percy Bysshe Shelley 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC pages.infinit.net [Source type: General]

    ^ Dear the boon to Fancy given, Retracted whilst it's granted: Sweet the rose which lives in Heaven, Although on earth 'tis planted, Where its honours blow, While by earth's slaves the leaves are riven Which die the while they glow.

    ^ Her clarion o’er the dreaming earth, and fill (Driving sweet buds like flocks to feed in air) With living hues and odours plain and hill: .

    • "The Solitary" (1810) st. 2
  • Sweet the rose which lives in Heaven,
    Although on earth ’tis planted
    ,
    Where its honours blow,
    While by earth’s slaves the leaves are riven
    Which die the while they glow.
    • Untitled (1810); titled "Love's Rose" by William Michael Rossetti in Complete Poetical Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley (1870)
.
I think that the leaf of a tree, the meanest insect ...
^ I think that the leaf of a tree, the meanest insect on wh.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Untitled (1810); titled "Love's Rose" by William Michael Rossetti in Complete Poetical Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley (1870) I think that the leaf of a tree, the meanest insect ...
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

are in themselves arguments more conclusive than any which can be adduced that some vast intellect animates .Infinity.
  • Age cannot Love destroy,
    But perfidy can blast the flower,
    Even when in most unwary hour
    It blooms in Fancy’s bower.

    Age cannot Love destroy,
    But perfidy can rend the shrine
    In which its vermeil splendours shine.^ Age cannot Love destroy, But perfidy can rend the shrine In which its vermeil splendours shine.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Age cannot Love destroy, But perfidy can blast the flower, Even when in most unwary hour It blooms in Fancy’s bower.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Wilt thou forget the happy hours Which we buried in Love's sweet bowers, Heaping over their corpses cold Blossoms and leaves, instead of mould?
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Untitled (1810); titled "Love's Rose" by William Michael Rossetti in Complete Poetical Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley (1870)
  • Here I swear, and as I break my oath may Infinity Eternity blast me, here I swear that never will I forgive Christianity!^ Poetical works of Percy Bysshe Shelly / edited by Mrs. Shelley.

    ^ Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822.

    ^ Percy Bysshe Shelley [microform].

    It is the only point on which I allow myself to encourage revenge... .Oh, how I wish I were the Antichrist, that it were mine to crush the Demon, to hurl him to his native Hell never to rise again — I expect to gratify some of this insatiable feeling in Poetry.^ It is clear that he never found in Byron a perfect friend, and that he had not accepted him as one with whom he sympathized upon the deeper questions of feeling and conduct.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

.
GOVERNMENT has no rights; it is a delegation from several individuals for the purpose of securing their own...
  • I think that the leaf of a tree, the meanest insect on wh.^ "In no individual perhaps was the moral sense ever more completely developed than in Shelley; in no being was the perception of right and of wrong more acute.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    we trample are in themselves arguments more conclusive than any which can be adduced that some vast intellect animates Infinity. .
    • Letter to Thomas Jefferson Hogg (1811-01-03)
  • GOVERNMENT has no rights; it is a delegation from several individuals for the purpose of securing their own.^ Letter to Thomas Jefferson Hogg ( 1811 - 01-03 ) GOVERNMENT has no rights; it is a delegation from several individuals for the purpose of securing their own.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Hogg, Thomas Jefferson, 1792-1862.

    ^ Letter to Thomas Jefferson Hogg ( 1811 - 01-03 ) GOVERNMENT has no rights; it is a delegation from several individuals for the purpose of securing their own...
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .It is therefore just, only so far as it exists by their consent, useful only so far as it operates to their well-being.
    • "Declaration of Rights" (1812), article 1
  • No man has a right to disturb the public peace, by personally resisting the execution of a law however bad.^ "In no individual perhaps was the moral sense ever more completely developed than in Shelley; in no being was the perception of right and of wrong more acute.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 1/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is therefore but just to await their publication before pronouncing a decided judgment.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It were much better that a sentient being should never have existed, than that it should have existed only to endure unmitigated misery."
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - To A Skylark; Percy Bysshe Shelley Biography 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.booksmusicfilmstv.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .He ought to acquiesce, using at the same time the utmost powers of his reason, to promote its repeal.^ He ought to acquiesce, using at the same time the utmost powers of his reason, to promote its repeal.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And I think that the "powerful" words, however annoying they may be, are an exciting twist to the game, while being creative and flowing at the same time.
    • Silent Conversation Walkthrough Guide, Review, Discussion, Hints and Tips at Jay is Games 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC jayisgames.com [Source type: General]

    .
    • "Declaration of Rights" (1812), article 9
  • Man has no right to kill his brother, it is no excuse that he does so in uniform.^ On the 19th of August this man was arrested in the streets of Barnstaple, and sentenced to six months' imprisonment for uttering a seditious pamphlet; and the remaining copies of the "Declaration of Rights" were destroyed.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 1/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    .He only adds the infamy of servitude to the crime of murder.^ He only adds the infamy of servitude to the crime of murder.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    • "Declaration of Rights" (1812), article 19
  • Belief is involuntary; nothing involuntary is meritorious or reprehensible. .A man ought not to be considered worse or better for his belief.^ A man ought not to be considered worse or better for his belief.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • "Declaration of Rights" (1812), article 23
  • A Christian, a Deist, a Turk, and a Jew, have equal rights: they are men and brethren.^ Hate men who cant, and men who pray, _5 And men who rail like thee; An equal passion to repay They are not coy like me.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    • "Declaration of Rights" (1812), article 24
.
The awful shadow of some unseen Power
Floats though unseen among us; visiting
This various world with as inconstant wing
As summer winds that creep from flower to flower...
  • If a person's religious ideas correspond not with your own, love him nevertheless. How different would yours have been, had the chance of birth placed you in Tartary or India!^ THE AWFUL shadow of some unseen Power Floats though unseen among us,—visiting This various world with as inconstant wing As summer winds that creep from flower to flower,— Like moonbeams that behind some piny mountain shower, It visits with inconstant glance Each human heart and countenance; Like hues and harmonies of evening,— Like clouds in starlight widely spread,— Like memory of music fled,— Like aught that for its grace may be Dear, and yet dearer for its mystery .
    • Poets on Poets » percy bysshe shelley 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.rc.umd.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Long, long ago, an old woman had somehow come to own some bright crystals, which, when placed in water, had miraculous powers of rendering the liquid an infallible cure for all "the ills to which flesh is heir".
    • *�*  Wilson's Almanac free daily ezine | Book of Days | August 4 |Loch-mo-Naire pilgrimage King Sebastian Sebastianism Sebastianists de SotoQuigate sun-worshippers priory Walsingham Mary apparition 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.wilsonsalmanac.com [Source type: General]

    ^ The awful shadow of some unseen Power Floats though unseen among us,--visiting This various world with as inconstant wing As summer winds that creep from flower to flower,-- Like moonbeams that behind some piny mountain shower, _5 It visits with inconstant glance Each human heart and countenance; Like hues and harmonies of evening,-- Like clouds in starlight widely spread,-- Like memory of music fled,-- _10 Like aught that for its grace may be Dear, and yet dearer for its mystery.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    • "Declaration of Rights" (1812), article 25
  • Once, early in the morning,
    Beelzebub arose,
    With care his sweet person adorning,
    He put on his Sunday clothes.
Spirit of BEAUTY, that dost consecrate
With thine own hues all thou dost shine upon
Of human thought or form, where art thou gone?
  • The awful shadow of some unseen Power
    Floats though unseen among us; visiting
    This various world with as inconstant wing
    As summer winds that creep from flower to flower
    ;
    Like moonbeams that behind some piny mountain shower,
    It visits with inconstant glance
    Each human heart and countenance
    ;
    Like hues and harmonies of evening,
    Like clouds in starlight widely spread,
    Like memory of music fled,
    Like aught that for its grace may be
    Dear, and yet dearer for its mystery.
  • Spirit of BEAUTY, that dost consecrate
    With thine own hues all thou dost shine upon
    Of human thought or form, where art thou gone?

    Why dost thou pass away and leave our state,
    This dim vast vale of tears, vacant and desolate?
    .Ask why the sunlight not for ever
    Weaves rainbows o'er yon mountain-river,
    Why aught should fail and fade that once is shown,
    Why fear and dream and death and birth
    Cast on the daylight of this earth
    Such gloom, why man has such a scope
    For love and hate, despondency and hope?
    ^ Ask why the sunlight not for ever Weaves rainbows o'er yon mountain-river, Why aught should fail and fade that once is shown, Why fear and dream and death and birth Cast on the daylight of this earth Such gloom, why man has such a scope For love and hate, despondency and hope?
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Ask why the sunlight not for ever Weaves rainbows o'er yon mountain-river, Why aught should fail and fade that once is shown, _20 Why fear and dream and death and birth Cast on the daylight of this earth Such gloom,--why man has such a scope For love and hate, despondency and hope?
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Why do we fear or hope?
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    • Hymn to Intellectual Beauty, st. 2
  • Thy light alone like mist o'er mountains driven,
    Or music by the night-wind sent
    Through strings of some still instrument,
    Or moonlight on a midnight stream,
    Gives grace and truth to life's unquiet dream.
    • Hymn to Intellectual Beauty, st. 3
  • The day becomes more solemn and serene
    When noon is past; there is a harmony
    In autumn, and a lustre in its sky,
    Which through the summer is not heard or seen,
    As if it could not be, as if it had not been!

    Thus let thy power, which like the truth
    Of nature on my passive youth
    Descended, to my onward life supply
    Its calm, to one who worships thee,
    And every form containing thee,
    Whom, SPIRIT fair, thy spells did bind
    To fear himself, and love all human kind.
    • Hymn to Intellectual Beauty, st. 7
  • Some say that gleams of a remoter world
    Visit the soul in sleep, — that death is slumber,
    And that its shapes the busy thoughts outnumber
    Of those who wake and live.
  • We rest. — .A dream has power to poison sleep;
    We rise.
    ^ A dream has power to poison sleep; We rise.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    — One wandering thought pollutes the day;
    We feel, conceive or reason, laugh or weep;
    Embrace fond woe, or cast our cares away:
    It is the same! — For, be it joy or sorrow,
    The path of its departure still is free:
    Man's yesterday may ne'er be like his morrow;
    Nought may endure but Mutability.
  • A wild dissolving bliss
    Over my frame he breathed, approaching near,
    And bent his eyes of kindling tenderness
    Near mine, and on my lips impressed a lingering kiss.
  • With hue like that when some great painter dips
    His pencil in the gloom of earthquake and eclipse.
    • The Revolt of Islam, Canto V, st. 23
  • Fear not the future, weep not for the past.
    • The Revolt of Islam, Canto XI, st. 18
  • Yet now despair itself is mild,
    Even as the winds and waters are;
    I could lie down like a tired child,
    And weep away the life of care
    Which I have borne and yet must bear,
    Till death like sleep might steal on me,
    And I might feel in the warm air
    My cheek grow cold, and hear the sea
    Breathe o'er my dying brain its last monotony.
  • Chameleons feed on light and air:
    Poets' food is love and fame.
Nothing in the world is single,
All things by a law divine
In one another's being mingle —
Why not I with thine?'
  • Nothing in the world is single,
    All things by a law divine
    In one another's being mingle —
    Why not I with thine?
    • Love's Philosophy, st. 1 (1819)
    • Variant:
    • All things by a law divine
      In one spirit meet and mingle —
      Why not I with thine? .
      • Less widely published variant which appears in the original manuscript.
  • I arise from dreams of thee
    In the first sweet sleep of night,
    When the winds are breathing low,
    And the stars are shining bright.^ Less widely published variant which appears in the original manuscript.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I arise from dreams of thee In the first sweet sleep of night, When the winds are breathing low, And the stars are shining bright.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I arise from dreams of thee In the first sweet sleep of night, When the winds are breathing low, And the stars are shining bright: I arise from dreams of thee, _5 And a spirit in my feet Hath led me--who knows how?
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

  • O lift me from the grass!
    I die! I faint! I fail!
    .Let thy love in kisses rain
    On my lips and eyelids pale.
    ^ Let thy love in kisses rain On my lips and eyelids pale.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I fear thy kisses, gentle maiden, Thou needest not fear mine; My spirit is too deeply laden Ever to burthen thine.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Teach me half the gladness That thy brain must know, Such harmonious madness From my lips would flow The world should listen then--as I am listening now.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]


    .My cheek is cold and white, alas!^ My cheek is cold and white, alas!
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]


    .My heart beats loud and fast:
    O press it to thine own again,
    Where it will break at last!
    ^ My heart beats loud and fast;-- Oh!
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Thou art murmuring--thou art weeping-- Is thine icy bosom leaping While my burning heart lies sleeping?
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Browning manuscript; press it close to thine Harvard manuscript, 1824, 1839, 1st edition; press me to thine own, 1822.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    • The Indian Serenade, st. 3
  • Hell is a city much like London —
    A populous and smoky city. .
    • Peter Bell the Third, Pt.^ Peter Bell the Third) and B .

      ^ Peter Bell the Third : a facsimile of the press-copy transcript ...

      III, st. 1 (1819)
  • Teas,
    Where small talk dies in agonies. .
    • Peter Bell the Third, Pt.^ Peter Bell the Third) and B .

      ^ Peter Bell the Third , Pt.
      • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Peter Bell the Third : a facsimile of the press-copy transcript ...

      III, st. 12
  • I have drunken deep of joy,
    And I will taste no other wine tonight.
    • The Cenci, Act I, sc. iii, l. .88 (1819)
  • The breath
    Of accusation kills an innocent name,
    And leaves for lame acquittal the poor life,
    Which is a mask without it.^ The breath Of accusation kills an innocent name, And leaves for lame acquittal the poor life, Which is a mask without it.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • The Cenci (1819)
  • An old, mad, blind, despised, and dying king, —
    Princes, the dregs of their dull race, who flow
    Through public scorn, — mud from a muddy spring, —
    Rulers who neither see, nor feel, nor know,
    But leech-like to their fainting country cling,
    Till they drop, blind in blood, without a blow.^ The Cenci (1819) An old, mad, blind, despised, and dying king, — Princes, the dregs of their dull race, who flow Through public scorn, — mud from a muddy spring, — Rulers who neither see, nor feel, nor know, But leech-like to their fainting country cling, Till they drop, blind in blood, without a blow.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ An old, mad, blind, despised, and dying king,-- Princes, the dregs of their dull race, who flow Through public scorn,--mud from a muddy spring,-- Rulers who neither see, nor feel, nor know, But leech-like to their fainting country cling, _5 Till they drop, blind in blood, without a blow,-- A people starved and stabbed in the untilled field,-- An army, which liberticide and prey Makes as a two-edged sword to all who wield,-- Golden and sanguine laws which tempt and slay; _10 Religion Christless, Godless--a book sealed; A Senate,--Time's worst statute, unrepealed,-- Are graves from which a glorious Phantom may Burst, to illumine our tempestuous day.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ An old, mad, blind, de­spised and dy­ing king,-- Princes the dregs of their dull race who flow Through pub­lic scorn, mud from a mud­dy spring,-- Rulers who nei­ther see, nor feel, nor know, But leech-​like to their faint­ing coun­try cling, Till they drop blind in blood with­out a blow,-- A peo­ple starved and stabbed in un­filled field,-- An army which lib­er­ti­cide and prey Make as a two-​edged sword to all who wield,-- Gold­en and san­guine laws which tempt and slay-- Re­li­gion Christ­less, God­less, a book sealed,-- A Sen­ate--time's worst statute un­re­pealed,-- Are graves from which a glo­ri­ous phan­tom may Burst to il­lu­mine our tem­pes­tu­ous day?” .
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley as a Philosopher and Reformer by Sotheran, Charles - Pages 1-70 | Lexcycle 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.lexcycle.com [Source type: Original source]

  • A lovely lady, garmented in light
    From her own beauty.^ A lovely lady, garmented in light From her own beauty.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The great secret of morals is love; or a going out of our nature, and an identification of ourselves with the beautiful which exists in thought, action, or person, not our own.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Percy Bysshe Shelley: Defence of Poetry, 1819 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ For love, and beauty, and delight, There is no death nor change: their might _135 Exceeds our organs, which endure No light, being themselves obscure.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

  • First our pleasures die — and then
    Our hopes, and then our fears — and when
    These are dead, the debt is due,
    Dust claims dust — and we die too.
    • Death, st. 3 (1820)
  • There grew pied wind-flowers and violets,
    Daisies, those pearl’d Arcturi of the earth,
    The constellated flower that never sets;
    Faint oxlips; tender bluebells at whose birth
    The sod scarce heaved; and that tall flower that wets
    Its mother’s face with heaven-collected tears,
    When the low wind, its playmate’s voice, it hears.
  • Though we eat little flesh and drink no wine,
    Yet let's be merry: we'll have tea and toast;
    Custards for supper, and an endless host
    Of syllabubs and jellies and mince-pies,
    And other such ladylike luxuries. .
    • Letter to Maria Gisborne (1820)
  • A Sensitive Plant in a garden grew,
    And the young winds fed it with silver dew,
    And it opened its fan-like leaves to the light.^ And it opened its fan-like leaves to the light.
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]
    • The Sensitive Plant - Percy Bysshe Shelley - Kalliope 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.kalliope.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And the young winds fed it with silver dew, .
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]
    • The Sensitive Plant - Percy Bysshe Shelley - Kalliope 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.kalliope.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Letter to Maria Gisborne (1820) A Sensitive Plant in a garden grew, And the young winds fed it with silver dew, And it opened its fan-like leaves to the light.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]


    .And closed them beneath the kisses of Night.^ And closed them beneath the kisses of Night.
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]
    • The Sensitive Plant - Percy Bysshe Shelley - Kalliope 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.kalliope.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
.
Music, when soft voices die,
Vibrates in the memory...
  • Rough wind, the moanest loud
    Grief too sad for song;
    Wild wind, when sullen cloud
    Knells all the night long;
    Sad storm, whose tears are vain,
    Bare woods, whose branches strain,
    Deep caves and dreary main, —
    Wail, for the world's wrong!^ Rough wind, that moanest loud Grief too sad for song; Wild wind, when sullen cloud Knells all the night long; Sad storm whose tears are vain, _5 Bare woods, whose branches strain, Deep caves and dreary main,-- Wail, for the world's wrong!
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Rough wind, the moanest loud Grief too sad for song; Wild wind, when sullen cloud Knells all the night long; Sad storm, whose tears are vain, Bare woods, whose branches strain, Deep caves and dreary main, — Wail, for the world's wrong!
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ All the earth and air With thy voice is loud, As, when night is bare, From one lonely cloud The moon rains out her beams, and heaven is overflowed.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - To A Skylark; Percy Bysshe Shelley Biography 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.booksmusicfilmstv.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .
  • Music, when soft voices die,
    Vibrates in the memory —
    Odours, when sweet violets sicken,
    Live within the sense they quicken.^ MUSIC, when soft voices die, Vibrates in the memory; Odours, when sweet violets sicken, Live within the sense they quicken.
    • Poets on Poets » percy bysshe shelley 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.rc.umd.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It was felt like an odour within the sense; .
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]
    • The Sensitive Plant - Percy Bysshe Shelley - Kalliope 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.kalliope.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Music, when soft voices die, Vibrates in the memory-- Odours, when sweet violets sicken, Live within the sense they quicken.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]


    .Rose leaves, when the rose is dead,
    Are heaped for the beloved's bed;
    And so thy thoughts, when thou art gone,
    Love itself shall slumber on.
    ^ Rose leaves, when the rose is dead, _5 Are heaped for the beloved's bed; And so thy thoughts, when thou art gone, Love itself shall slumber on.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But thou art Love itself—ruling the motion .
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Where art thou, beloved To-morrow?
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

One word is too often profaned
For me to profane it;
One feeling too falsely disdained
For thee to disdain it.
  • One word is too often profaned
    For me to profane it;
    One feeling too falsely disdained
    For thee to disdain it.
  • The desire of the moth for the star,
    Of the night for the morrow,
    The devotion to something afar
    From the sphere of our sorrow.
    • One Word is Too Often Profaned, st. 2
  • Swiftly walk over the western wave,
    Spirit of Night!
    .Out of the misty eastern cave
    Where, all the long and lone daylight,
    Thou wovest dreams of joy and fear,
    Which make thee terrible and dear, —
    Swift be thy flight!
    ^ Out of the misty eastern cave, Where all the long and lone daylight, Thou wovest dreams of joy and fear, Which make thee terrible and dear,-- Swift be thy flight!
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 3/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Speed thee in thy fiery flight, .
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Now beckoning thee out of thy misty throne .
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

  • Death will come when thou art dead,
    Soon, too soon —
    Sleep will come when thou art fled;
    Of neither would I ask the boon
    I ask of thee, beloved Night —
    Swift be thine approaching flight,
    Come soon, soon!
    • To Night, st. 5
.
When the lamp is shattered
The light in the dust lies dead —
When the cloud is scattered,
The rainbow's glory is shed.
  • There is no sport in hate where all the rage
    Is on one side.
    • Lines to a Reviewer, l.^ There is no sport in hate where all the rage .
      • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

      ^ From rainbow clouds there flow not .
      • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

      ^ When the lamp is shattered The light in the dust lies dead-- When the cloud is scattered The rainbow's glory is shed.
      • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

      .3 (1821)
  • When the lamp is shattered
    The light in the dust lies dead —
    When the cloud is scattered,
    The rainbow's glory is shed.^ To Night , st. When the lamp is shattered The light in the dust lies dead — When the cloud is scattered, The rainbow's glory is shed.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ When the lamp is shattered The light in the dust lies dead — When the cloud is scattered, The rainbow's glory is shed.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

The more we study the more we discover our ignorance...
  • The more we study, we the more discover
    Our ignorance. .
    • "Scenes from the Magico Prodigioso", sc.^ Scenes from the Faust of Goethe, Ginevra, Scenes from the Magico prodigioso of Calderon, Fragments of an unfinished drama, Lines--When the lamp is shattered, From .

      ^ "Scenes from the Magico Prodigioso", sc.
      • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      i .(1822)
  • Are ye, two vultures sick for battle,
    Two scorpions under one wet stone,
    Two bloodless wolves whose dry throats rattle,
    Two crows perched on the murrained cattle,
    Two vipers tangled into one.^ Are ye, two vultures sick for battle, Two scorpions under one wet stone, Two bloodless wolves whose dry throats rattle, Two crows perched on the murrained cattle, Two vipers tangled into one.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ These are two friends whose lives were undivided; So let their memory be, now they have glided Under the grave; let not their bones be parted, For their two hearts in life were single-hearted.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A gentle story of two lovers young, Who met in innocence and died in sorrow, And of one selfish heart, whose rancour clung Like curses on them; are ye slow to borrow The lore of truth from such a tale?
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

The body is placed under the earth, and after a certain period there remains no vestige even of its form...

The Necessity of Atheism (1811)

.
  • There Is No God
    This negation must be understood solely to affect a creative Deity.^ There Is No God This negation must be understood solely to affect a creative Deity.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "God omnipotent, Is there no mercy?
    • Queen Mab by Percy Bysshe Shelley 1813 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.marxists.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ There is no God!
    • Queen Mab by Percy Bysshe Shelley 1813 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.marxists.org [Source type: Original source]

    .The hypothesis of a pervading Spirit co-eternal with the universe remains unshaken.
  • If he is infinitely good, what reason should we have to fear him?^ The hypothesis of a pervading Spirit co-eternal with the universe remains unshaken.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ If he is infinitely good, what reason should we have to fear him?
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Such hope, as is the sick despair of good, Such fear, as is the certainty of ill, Such doubt, as is pale Expectation's food Turned while she tastes to poison, when the will Is powerless, and the spirit...
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]


    .If he is infinitely wise, why should we have doubts concerning our future?^ If he is infinitely wise, why should we have doubts concerning our future?
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]


    .If he knows all, why warn him of our needs and fatigue him with our prayers?^ And these, With some exceptions, which I need not tease Your patience by descanting on, are all You and I know in London.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A murderer heard His voice in Egypt, one whose gifts and arts Had raised him to his eminence in power, Accomplice of omnipotence in crime And confidant of the all-knowing one.
    • Queen Mab by Percy Bysshe Shelley 1813 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.marxists.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ This master-touch of unconscious delineation tells us all we need to know about the domestic party now established in 7, Lower Sackville Street.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 1/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]


    .If he is everywhere, why erect temples to him?^ If he is everywhere, why erect temples to him?
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]


    .If he is just, why fear that he will punish the creatures that he has filled with weaknesses?

    If grace does everything for them, what reason would he have for recompensing them?^ If he is just, why fear that he will punish the creatures that he has filled with weaknesses?
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ If grace does everything for them, what reason would he have for recompensing them?
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]


    .If he is all-powerful, how offend him, how resist him?^ If he is all-powerful, how offend him, how resist him?
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The preface to "Laon and Cythna" shows what a powerful impression had been made upon him by the glaciers, and how he delighted in the element of peril.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A murderer heard His voice in Egypt, one whose gifts and arts Had raised him to his eminence in power, Accomplice of omnipotence in crime And confidant of the all-knowing one.
    • Queen Mab by Percy Bysshe Shelley 1813 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.marxists.org [Source type: Original source]


    .If he is reasonable, how can he be angry at the blind, to whom he has given the liberty of being unreasonable?^ If he is reasonable, how can he be angry at the blind, to whom he has given the liberty of being unreasonable?
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ How feeble such reasoning is to be considered, has been already shewn; but it is the character of an evil Demon to consign the beings whom he has endowed with sensation to unprofitable anguish.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]


    .If he is immovable, by what right do we pretend to make him change his decrees?^ If he is immovable, by what right do we pretend to make him change his decrees?
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]


    .If he is inconceivable, why occupy ourselves with him?^ If he is inconceivable, why occupy ourselves with him?
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]


    .If he has spoken, why is the universe not convinced?^ If he has spoken, why is the universe not convinced?
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]


    .If the knowledge of a God is the most necessary, why is it not the most evident and the clearest?^ If the knowledge of a God is the most necessary, why is it not the most evident and the clearest?
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • NOTE: Further research is needed here.^ NOTE: Further research is needed here.
      • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .The above quotes might actually be a translation of Shelley's quotation of Systeme de la Nature (1770) by Baron d'Holbach.
  • The body is placed under the earth, and after a certain period there remains no vestige even of its form.^ The above quotes might actually be a translation of Shelley's quotation of Systeme de la Nature (1770) by Baron d'Holbach .
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ There is no death nor change: their might .
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The body is placed under the earth, and after a certain period there remains no vestige even of its form.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .This is that contemplation of inexhaustible melancholy, whose shadow eclipses the brightness of the world.^ This is that contemplation of inexhaustible melancholy, whose shadow eclipses the brightness of the world.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .The common observer is struck with dejection of the spectacle.^ The common observer is struck with dejection of the spectacle.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .He contends in vain against the persuasion of the grave, that the dead indeed cease to be.^ He contends in vain against the persuasion of the grave, that the dead indeed cease to be.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .The corpse at his feet is prophetic of his own destiny.^ The corpse at his feet is prophetic of his own destiny.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Those who have preceded him, and whose voice was delightful to his ear; whose touch met his like sweet and subtle fire: whose aspect spread a visionary light upon his path — these he cannot meet again.
  • We must prove design before we can infer a designer.^ Alternate: Design must be proved before a designer can be inferred.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ We must prove design before we can infer a designer.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Those who have preceded him, and whose voice was delightful to his ear; whose touch met his like sweet and subtle fire: whose aspect spread a visionary light upon his path — these he cannot meet again.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    [1] .
    • Alternate: Design must be proved before a designer can be inferred.^ Alternate: Design must be proved before a designer can be inferred.
      • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ We must prove design before we can infer a designer.
      • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      [2]

Queen Mab (1813)

.
  • How wonderful is Death,
    Death and his brother Sleep!^ How wonderful is Death, Death, and his brother Sleep!
    • Queen Mab by Percy Bysshe Shelley 1813 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.marxists.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Canto I
.
Nature rejects the monarch, not the man; the subject, not the citizen...
^ Nature rejects the monarch, not the man; The subject, not the citizen; for kings And subjects, mutual foes, forever play A losing game into each other’s hands, Whose stakes are vice and misery.
  • Queen Mab by Percy Bysshe Shelley 1813 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.marxists.org [Source type: Original source]

.The man of virtuous soul commands not, nor obeys.
  • Nature rejects the monarch, not the man;
    The subject, not the citizen; for kings
    And subjects, mutual foes, forever play
    A losing game into each other's hands,
    Whose stakes are vice and misery.^ The man Of virtuous soul commands not, nor obeys.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Queen Mab by Percy Bysshe Shelley 1813 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.marxists.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Nature rejects the monarch, not the man; The subject, not the citizen; for kings And subjects, mutual foes, forever play A losing game into each other's hands, Whose stakes are vice and misery.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Nature rejects the monarch, not the man; The subject, not the citizen; for kings And subjects, mutual foes, forever play A losing game into each other’s hands, Whose stakes are vice and misery.
    • Queen Mab by Percy Bysshe Shelley 1813 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.marxists.org [Source type: Original source]

    .The man
    Of virtuous soul commands not, nor obeys.
    ^ The man Of virtuous soul commands not, nor obeys.
    • Queen Mab by Percy Bysshe Shelley 1813 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.marxists.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The man Of vir­tu­ous soul com­mands not nor obeys.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley as a Philosopher and Reformer by Sotheran, Charles - Pages 1-70 | Lexcycle 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.lexcycle.com [Source type: Original source]


    .Power, like a desolating pestilence,
    Pollutes whate'er it touches; and obedience,
    Bane of all genius, virtue, freedom, truth,
    Makes slaves of men, and of the human frame
    A mechanized automaton.
    • Canto III
  • Heaven's ebon vault,
    Studded with stars unutterably bright,
    Through which the moon's unclouded grandeur rolls,
    Seems like a canopy which love has spread
    To curtain her sleeping world.^ All those who love—and who e’er loved like thee, .
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Power, like a desolating pestilence, Pollutes whate'er it touches; and obedience, Bane of all genius, virtue, freedom, truth, Makes slaves of men, and of the human frame A mechanized automaton.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Queen Mab by Percy Bysshe Shelley 1813 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.marxists.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Love is like understanding, that grows bright, gazing on many truths...
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Canto IV
  • War is the statesman's game, the priest's delight,
    The lawyer's jest, the hired assassin's trade.^ War is the statesman’s game, the priest’s delight, The lawyer’s jest, the hired assassin’s trade, And to those royal murderers whose mean thrones Are bought by crimes of treachery and gore, The bread they eat, the staff on which they lean.
    • Queen Mab by Percy Bysshe Shelley 1813 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.marxists.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ War is the states­man's game, the priest's de­light, The lawyer's jest, the hired as­sas­sin's trade.” .
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley as a Philosopher and Reformer by Sotheran, Charles - Pages 1-70 | Lexcycle 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.lexcycle.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Canto IV
  • Thus suicidal selfishness, that blights
    The fairest feelings of the opening heart,
    Is destined to decay, whilst from the soil
    Shall spring all virtue, all delight, all love,
    And judgment cease to wage unnatural war
    With passion's unsubduable array.
    • Canto V
  • Twin-sister of Religion, Selfishness!^ Canto IV Thus suicidal selfishness, that blights The fairest feelings of the opening heart, Is destined to decay, whilst from the soil Shall spring all virtue, all delight, all love, And judgment cease to wage unnatural war With passion's unsubduable array.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Canto IV War is the statesman's game, the priest's delight, The lawyer's jest, the hired assassin's trade.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Over the lakes and the plains, Wherever he dream, under mountain or stream, The Spirit he loves remains; And I all the while bask in Heaven's blue smile, Whilst he is dissolving in rains.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]


    .Rival in crime and falsehood, aping all
    The wanton horrors of her bloody play;
    Yet frozen, unimpassioned, spiritless,
    Shunning the light, and owning not its name,
    Compelled by its deformity to screen
    With flimsy veil of justice and of right
    Its unattractive lineaments that scare
    All save the brood of ignorance; at once
    The cause and the effect of tyranny;
    Unblushing, hardened, sensual and vile;
    Dead to all love but of its abjectness;
    With heart impassive by more noble powers
    Than unshared pleasure, sordid gain, or fame;
    Despising its own miserable being,
    Which still it longs, yet fears, to disenthrall.
    ^ Received more than all, it loved more than ever, .
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Rival in crime and falsehood, aping all The wanton horrors of her bloody play; Yet frozen, unimpassioned, spiritless, Shunning the light, and owning not its name, Compelled by its deformity to screen With flimsy veil of justice and of right Its unattractive lineaments that scare All save the brood of ignorance; at once The cause and the effect of tyranny; Unblushing, hardened, sensual and vile; Dead to all love but of its abjectness; With heart impassive by more noble powers Than unshared pleasure, sordid gain, or fame; Despising its own miserable being, Which still it longs, yet fears, to disenthrall.
    • Queen Mab by Percy Bysshe Shelley 1813 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.marxists.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I know Too late, since thou and France are in the dust, That virtue owns a more eter­nal foe Than force or fraud; old cus­tom, le­gal crime, And bloody Faith, the foulest birth of time.” .
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley as a Philosopher and Reformer by Sotheran, Charles - Pages 1-70 | Lexcycle 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.lexcycle.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Canto V
  • Gold is a living god and rules in scorn,
    All earthly things but virtue.
    • Canto V
  • A husband and wife ought to continue so long united as they love each other.^ But in the temple of their hireling hearts Gold is a living god and rules in scorn All earthly things but virtue.
    • Queen Mab by Percy Bysshe Shelley 1813 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.marxists.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Canto V Gold is a living god and rules in scorn, All earthly things but virtue.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ All things that we love and cherish, .
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    .Any law which should bind them to cohabitation for one moment after the decay of their affection, would be a most intolerable tyranny, and the most unworthy of toleration.^ At one time, while the question was still pending, the Chancellor had said some words that seemed to intimate that Shelley should not be permitted the care of any of his children, and for a moment he feared that our infant son would be torn from us.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Any law which should bind them to co­hab­ita­tion for one mo­ment af­ter the de­cay of their af­fec­tion, would be a most in­tol­er­able tyran­ny, and the most un­wor­thy of tol­er­ation; and there is noth­ing _im­moral_ in this sep­ara­tion, for love is free.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley as a Philosopher and Reformer by Sotheran, Charles - Pages 1-70 | Lexcycle 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.lexcycle.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In the United States the rule in Shelley's case was at one time in operation as a part of the common law, but it has been repealed by See also: STATUTE statute in most states .
    • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

    .
    • Notes
  • Love is free: to promise for ever to love the same woman, is not less absurd than to promise to believe the same creed: such a vow in both cases, excludes us from all enquiry.^ To promise for­ev­er to love the same wom­an, is not less ab­surd than to promise to be­lieve the same creed.” .
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley as a Philosopher and Reformer by Sotheran, Charles - Pages 1-70 | Lexcycle 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.lexcycle.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Received more than all, it loved more than ever, .
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Notes Love is free: to promise for ever to love the same woman, is not less absurd than to promise to believe the same creed: such a vow in both cases, excludes us from all enquiry.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Notes
  • Chastity is a monkish and evangelical superstition, a greater foe to natural temperance even than unintellectual sensuality; it strikes at the root of all domestic happiness, and consigns more than half the human race to misery.^ Notes Chastity is a monkish and evangelical superstition, a greater foe to natural temperance even than unintellectual sensuality; it strikes at the root of all domestic happiness, and consigns more than half the human race to misery.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Was there not more of what you might call Spinoza­ism in Wordsworth than even in Co­leridge, who spoke more of Spinoza?
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley as a Philosopher and Reformer by Sotheran, Charles - Pages 1-70 | Lexcycle 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.lexcycle.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Love was the root and basis of his nature: this love, first developed as domestic affection, next as friendship, then as a youth's passion, now began to shine with steady lustre as an all-embracing devotion to his fellow-men.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 1/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    • Notes
  • It is only by softening and disguising dead flesh by culinary preparation, that it is rendered susceptible of mastication or digestion; and that the sight of its bloody juices and raw horror does not excite intolerable loathing and disgust.
    • Notes
My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair!

Ozymandias (1818)

.
  • I met a traveller from an antique land
    Who said: — Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
    Stand in the desert.
    Near them on the sand,
    Half sunk, a shatter'd visage lies, whose frown
    And wrinkled lip and sneer of cold command
    Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
    Which yet survive, stamp'd on these lifeless things,
    The hand that mock'd them and the heart that fed.^ I met a traveller from an antique land Who said: — Two vast and trunkless legs of stone Stand in the desert.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I met a traveller from an antique land Who said: Two vast and trunkless legs of stone Stand in the desert...Near them, on the sand, Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown, And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command, _5 Tell that its sculptor well those passions read Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things, The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed: And on the pedestal these words appear: 'My name is Ozymandias, king of kings: _10 Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!'
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Near them on the sand, Half sunk, a shatter'd visage lies, whose frown And wrinkled lip and sneer of cold command Tell that its sculptor well those passions read Which yet survive, stamp'd on these lifeless things, The hand that mock'd them and the heart that fed.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]


    .And on the pedestal these words appear:
    "My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
    Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair!"
    ^ Notes My name is Ozymandias, king of kings: Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair!
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And on the pedestal these words appear: "My name is Ozymandias, king of kings: Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair!"
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I met a traveller from an antique land Who said: Two vast and trunkless legs of stone Stand in the desert...Near them, on the sand, Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown, And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command, _5 Tell that its sculptor well those passions read Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things, The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed: And on the pedestal these words appear: 'My name is Ozymandias, king of kings: _10 Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!'
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]


    Nothing beside remains: round the decay
    Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare,
    The lone and level sands stretch far away.
They dare not devise good for man’s estate,
And yet they know not that they do not dare.

Prometheus Unbound (1818-1819)

Full text online
Thy words are like a cloud of winged snakes;
And yet I pity those they torture not...
To know nor faith, nor love, nor law, to be
Omnipotent but friendless, is to reign.
Soul meets soul on lovers' lips.
To suffer woes which Hope thinks infinite; To forgive wrongs darker than Death or Night...
To defy Power, which seems Omnipotent; To love, and bear; to hope, till Hope creates from its own wreck the thing it contemplates...
This, like thy glory, Titan! is to be
.Good, great and joyous, beautiful and free;
This is alone Life; Joy, Empire, and Victory!
  • Ere Babylon was dust,
    The Magus Zoroaster, my dead child,
    Met his own image walking in the garden.^ Good, great and joyous, beautiful and free; This is alone Life; Joy, Empire, and Victory!
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Ere Babylon was dust, The Magus Zoroaster, my dead child, Met his own image walking in the garden.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ CHORUS: The golden gate of Sleep unbar, When Strength and Beauty, met together, Kindle their image, like a star _25 In a sea of glassy weather.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]


    That apparition, sole of men, he saw.
    • Earth, Act I, l. .191
  • In each human heart terror survives
    The ravin it has gorged: the loftiest fear
    All that they would disdain to think were true:
    Hypocrisy and custom make their minds
    The fanes of many a worship, now outworn.^ All wept, as I think both ye now would, .
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In each human heart terror survives The ravin it has gorged: the loftiest fear All that they would disdain to think were true: Hypocrisy and custom make their minds The fanes of many a worship, now outworn.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ All were fat; and well they might Be in admirable plight, For one by one, and two by two, He tossed them human hearts to chew.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]


    .They dare not devise good for man’s estate,
    And yet they know not that they do not dare.
    • Fury, Act I, l.^ It is likely that they were not averse to getting rid of him as a man dangerous to the peace of their society; and now they had a good occasion.
      • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 1/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
      • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

      .618–624
  • The good want power, but to weep barren tears.^ The powerful goodness want: worse need for them.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The good want power, but to weep barren tears.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]


    .The powerful goodness want: worse need for them.^ The powerful goodness want: worse need for them.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The good want power, but to weep barren tears.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]


    .The wise want love; and those who love want wisdom;
    And all best things are thus confused to ill.

    Many are strong and rich, and would be just,
    But live among their suffering fellow-men
    As if none felt: they know not what they do.^ All those who love—and who e’er loved like thee, .
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The wise want love; and those who love want wisdom; And all best things are thus confused to ill.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ All but those who need thee not.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    • Fury, Act I, l. .625–631
  • Thy words are like a cloud of winged snakes;
    And yet I pity those they torture not.
    • Prometheus, Act I, l.^ Thy words are like a cloud of winged snakes; And yet I pity those they torture not.
      • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Full text online Thy words are like a cloud of winged snakes; And yet I pity those they torture not...
      • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Yet, Freedom, yet, thy banner, torn but flying, Streams like a thunder-storm against the wind.--BYRON. 1.
      • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

      632
  • Peace is in the grave.
    .The grave hides all things beautiful and good.^ The grave hides all things beautiful and good.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Jesus Christ represented God as the principle of all good, the source of all happiness, the wise and benevolent Creator and Preserver of all living things.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Jesus Christ represented God as the principle of all good, the source of all happiness, the wise and benevolent Creator and Preserver of all living things...
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]


    I am a God and cannot find it there,
    Nor would I seek it; for, though dread revenge,
    This is defeat, fierce king, not victory.
    • Prometheus, Act I, l. .638
  • He will watch from dawn to gloom
    The lake-reflected sun illume
    The yellow bees in the ivy-bloom,
    Nor heed nor see, what things they be;
    But from these create he can
    Forms more real than living man,
    Nurslings of immortality!^ For him, as for the poet described by one of the spirit voices in "Prometheus", the bees in the ivy-bloom are scarcely heeded; they become in his mind,-- Forms more real than living man, Nurslings of immortality.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ When they love but live no more.
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The true poetry of Rome lived in its institutions; for whatever of beautiful, true, and majestic, they contained, could have sprung only from the faculty which creates the order in which they consist.
    • Modern History Sourcebook: Percy Bysshe Shelley: Defence of Poetry, 1819 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Fourth Spirit, Act I, l.^ Fourth Spirit , Act I, l.
      • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .742
  • To know nor faith, nor love, nor law, to be
    Omnipotent but friendless, is to reign.
    • Asia, Act II, sc.^ To know nor faith, nor love, nor law, to be Omnipotent but friendless, is to reign.
      • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Demogorgon , Act II, sc.
      • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Asia , Act II, sc.
      • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      iv, l. .47
  • All spirits are enslaved which serve things evil.
    • Demogorgon, Act II, sc.^ I love Love--though he has wings, And like light can flee, But above all other things, _45 Spirit, I love thee-- Thou art love and life!
      • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

      iv, l. .110
  • All love is sweet,
    Given or returned.^ Jump to: navigation , search All love is sweet, Given or returned.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ All love is sweet, Given or returned.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Unless Love feeds upon its own sweet self, Till it becomes all Music murmurs of.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Common as light is love,
    And its familiar voice wearies not ever.

    Like the wide heaven, the all-sustaining air,
    It makes the reptile equal to the God;
    They who inspire it most are fortunate,
    As I am now; but those who feel it most
    Are happier still.^ And the Earth was all rest, and the air was all love, .
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Common as light is love, And its familiar voice wearies not ever.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ All those who love—and who e’er loved like thee, .
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    • Asia, Act II, sc. v, l. .39
  • Death is the veil which those who live call life;
    They sleep, and it is lifted.^ Death is the veil which those who live call life; They sleep, and it is lifted.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Death is the veil which those who live call life; they sleep, and it is lifted."
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 3/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Ask him who lives, what is life?
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley as a Philosopher and Reformer by Sotheran, Charles - Pages 1-70 | Lexcycle 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.lexcycle.com [Source type: Original source]

    • Earth, Act III, sc. iii, l. .113
  • Nor yet exempt, though ruling them like slaves,
    From chance, and death, and mutability,
    The clogs of that which else might oversoar
    The loftiest star of unascended heaven,
    Pinnacled dim in the intense inane.^ Nor yet exempt, though ruling them like slaves, From chance, and death, and mutability, The clogs of that which else might oversoar The loftiest star of unascended heaven, Pinnacled dim in the intense inane.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Like a star of Heaven, .
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I am borne darkly, fearfully afar; Whilst burning through the inmost veil of Heaven, The soul of Adonais, like a star, Beacons from the abode where the Eternal are.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 3/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Spirit of the Hour, Act III, sc.^ Asia, withdrawn from sight during the first act, but spoken of as waiting in her exile for the fated hour, is the true mate of the human spirit.
      • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

      iv, l. .200
  • The pale stars are gone!^ The pale stars are gone!
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]


    .For the sun, their swift shepherd,
    To their folds them compelling,
    In the depths of the dawn,
    Hastes, in meteor-eclipsing array, and the flee
    Beyond his blue dwelling,
    As fawns flee the leopard.
    • Voice of Unseen Spirits, Act IV, l.^ Swift as a spirit hastening to his task Of glory and of good, the Sun sprang forth Rejoicing in his splendour, and the mask Of darkness fell from the awakened Earth.
      • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 3/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
      • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

      .1
  • Familiar acts are beautiful through love.
    • The Earth, Act IV, l.^ Familiar acts are beautiful through love.
      • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Instead of remaining true to the conception of Beauty expressed in the "Hymn," Shelley "sought through the world the One whom he may love."
      • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 3/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
      • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Tested by this standard, Shelley's identification of Intellectual Beauty with so many daughters of earth, and his worshipping love of Emilia, is a spurious Platonism.
      • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 3/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
      • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

      .403
  • Soul meets soul on lovers' lips.
    • The Moon, Act IV, l.^ Soul meets soul on lovers' lips.
      • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ The Moon , Act IV, l.
      • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .451
  • Man, who wert once a despot and a slave,
    A dupe and a deceiver!^ Man, who wert once a despot and a slave, A dupe and a deceiver!
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    a decay,
    .A traveller from the cradle to the grave
    Through the dim night of this immortal day.
    ^ A traveller from the cradle to the grave Through the dim night of this immortal day.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The thought of his own kind who made the soul Which sped that winged shape through night and day,-- _160 The thought of his own country...
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He wanders, like a day-appearing dream, Through the dim wildernesses of the mind; Through desert woods and tracts, which seem Like ocean, homeless, boundless, unconfined.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Demogorgon, Act IV, l.^ Demogorgon , Act IV, closing lines [ edit ] Julian and Maddalo (1819) .
      • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Demogorgon , Act IV, l.
      • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      549
  • This is the day, which down the void abysm
    At the Earth-born’s spell yawns for Heaven’s despotism
    And Conquest is dragged captive through the deep:
    Love, from its awful throne of patient power
    In the wise heart, from the last giddy hour
    Of dread endurance, from the slippery, steep,
    And narrow verge of crag-like agony, springs
    And folds over the world its healing wings.
    .
    • Demogorgon, Act IV, l.^ Demogorgon , Act IV, closing lines [ edit ] Julian and Maddalo (1819) .
      • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Demogorgon , Act IV, l.
      • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .554–561
  • Gentleness, Virtue, Wisdom, and Endurance,
    These are the seals of that most firm assurance
    Which bars the pit over Destruction’s strength
    ;
    And if, with infirm hand, Eternity,
    Mother of many acts and hours, should free
    The serpent that would clasp her with his length;
    These are the spells by which to reassume
    An empire o’er the disentangled doom.^ Be thou, then, one among mankind Whose heart is harder not for state, Thou only virtuous, gentle, kind, _15 Amid a world of hate; And by a slight endurance seal A fellow-being's lasting weal.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ When a mother clasps her child, Watch till dusty Death has piled His cold ashes on the clay; She has loved it many a day-- She remains,--it fades away.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Unhesitatingly, she placed her hand in his, and linked her fortune with his own; and most truthfully, as the remaining portions of these Memorials will prove, was the pledge of both redeemed.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Demogorgon, Act IV, l.^ Demogorgon , Act IV, closing lines [ edit ] Julian and Maddalo (1819) .
      • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Demogorgon , Act IV, l.
      • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .562–569
  • To suffer woes which Hope thinks infinite;
    To forgive wrongs darker than Death or Night;
    To defy Power, which seems Omnipotent;
    To love, and bear; to hope, till Hope creates
    From its own wreck the thing it contemplates;
    Neither to change nor falter nor repent;
    This, like thy glory, Titan!^ To love and hear--to hope till hope cre­ates From its own wreck the thing it con­tem­plates.” .
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley as a Philosopher and Reformer by Sotheran, Charles - Pages 1-70 | Lexcycle 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.lexcycle.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I would not be a king--enough Of woe it is to love; The path to power is steep and rough, And tempests reign above.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Thy beauty hangs around thee like Splendour around the moon-- Thy voice, as silver bells that strike Upon *** FRAGMENT: 'THE DEATH KNELL IS RINGING'.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    is to be
    Good, great and joyous, beautiful and free;
    This is alone Life; Joy, Empire, and Victory!
    • Demogorgon, Act IV, closing lines

Julian and Maddalo (1819)

.
  • I love all waste
    And solitary places; where we taste
    The pleasure of believing what we see
    Is boundless, as we wish our souls to be.^ I love all waste And solitary places; where we taste The pleasure of believing what we see Is boundless, as we wish our souls to be.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It was a waste and dreary scene; the desert sand stretched into a point surrounded by waves that broke idly though perpetually around; it was a scene very similar to Lido, of which he had said-- 'I love all waste And solitary places; where we taste The pleasure of believing what we see Is boundless, as we wish our souls to be: And such was this wide ocean, and this shore More barren than its billows.'
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ All things that we love and cherish, Like ourselves must fade and perish; Such is our rude mortal lot-- Love itself would, did they not.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    • l. 14
  • It is our will
    That thus enchains us to permitted ill.
    .We might be otherwise, we might be all
    We dream of happy, high, majestical.
    ^ We might be otherwise, we might be all We dream of happy, high, majestical.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]


    .Where is the love, beauty and truth we seek,
    But in our mind?
    ^ Where is the love, beauty and truth we seek, But in our mind?
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ For love, and beauty, and delight, There is no death nor change; their might Exceeds our organs, which endure No light, being themselves obscure.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 3/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    and if we were not weak,
    Should we be less in deed than in desire?
    • l. .170
  • Me — who am as a nerve o'er which do creep
    The else unfelt oppressions of this earth,
    And was to thee the flame upon thy hearth,
    When all beside was cold: — that thou on me
    Shouldst rain these plagues of blistering agony!^ All those who love—and who e’er loved like thee, .
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Me — who am as a nerve o'er which do creep The else unfelt oppressions of this earth, And was to thee the flame upon thy hearth, When all beside was cold: — that thou on me Shouldst rain these plagues of blistering agony!
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Thou taintest all thou lookest upon!
    • Queen Mab by Percy Bysshe Shelley 1813 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.marxists.org [Source type: Original source]

    • l. .449
  • Most wretched men
    Are cradled into poetry by wrong;
    They learn in suffering what they teach in song.^ Most wretched men Are cradled into poetry by wrong; They learn in suffering what they teach in song.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It may be parenthetically observed that one of the few familiar quotations from Shelley's poems occurs in "Julian and Maddalo":-- Most wretched men Are cradled into poetry by wrong: They learn in suffering what they teach in song.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Many are strong and rich, and would be just, But live among their suffering fellow-men As if none felt: they know not what they do.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    • l. 543
Wild Spirit, which art moving everywhere;
Destroyer and preserver; hear, oh, hear!

Ode to the West Wind (1819)

.
  • O wild West Wind, thou breath of Autumn's being,
    Thou, from whose unseen presence the leaves dead
    Are driven, like ghosts from an enchanter fleeing,
    Yellow, and black, and pale, and hectic red,
    Pestilence-stricken multitudes: O thou,
    Who chariotest to their dark wintry bed.^ O wild West Wind, thou breath of Autumn's being, Thou, from whose unseen presence the leaves dead Are driven, like ghosts from an enchanter fleeing, Yellow, and black, and pale, and hectic red, Pestilence-stricken multitudes: O thou, Who chariotest to their dark wintry bed.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Letter to Maria Gisborne (1820) A Sensitive Plant in a garden grew, And the young winds fed it with silver dew, And it opened its fan-like leaves to the light.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ O wild West Wind, thou breath of Autumn's being, Thou, from whose unseen presence the leaves dead Are driven, like ghosts from an enchanter fleeing, Yellow, and black, and pale, and hectic red, Pestilence-stricken multitudes: O thou, _5 Who chariotest to their dark wintry bed The winged seeds, where they lie cold and low, Each like a corpse within its grave, until Thine azure sister of the Spring shall blow Her clarion o'er the dreaming earth, and fill _10 (Driving sweet buds like flocks to feed in air) With living hues and odours plain and hill: Wild Spirit, which art moving everywhere; Destroyer and preserver; hear, oh, hear!
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    • St. I
  • Wild Spirit, which art moving everywhere;
    Destroyer and preserver; hear, oh, hear!
    • St. I
  • Thou dirge
    Of the dying year, to which this closing night
    Will be the dome of a vast sepulchre,
    Vaulted with all thy congregated might.
    • St. II
.
O Wind, If Winter comes, can Spring be far behind?
  • Thou who didst waken from his summer dreams
    The blue Mediterranean, where he lay,
    Lull'd by the coil of his crystalline streams
    Beside a pumice isle in Baiæ's bay,
    And saw in sleep old palaces and towers
    Quivering within the wave's intenser day,
    All overgrown with azure moss and flowers
    So sweet, the sense faints picturing them.^ Thou who didst waken from his summer dreams The blue Mediterranean, where he lay, _30 Lulled by the coil of his crystalline streams, Beside a pumice isle in Baiae's bay, And saw in sleep old palaces and towers Quivering within the wave's intenser day, All overgrown with azure moss and flowers _35 So sweet, the sense faints picturing them!
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Which to the flowers, did they waken or dream, .
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ O Wind, If Winter comes, can Spring be far behind?
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    • St. III
  • Oh, lift me as a wave, a leaf, a cloud!
    .I fall upon the thorns of life!^ I fall upon the thorns of life!
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    I bleed!
    • St. IV
  • Make me thy lyre, even as the forest is:
    What if my leaves are falling like its own!
    .The tumult of thy mighty harmonies
    Will take from both a deep, autumnal tone,
    Sweet though in sadness.
    ^ The tumult of thy mighty harmonies Will take from both a deep, autumnal tone, Sweet though in sadness.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The tumult of thy mighty harmonies Will take from both a deep, autumnal tone, _60 Sweet though in sadness.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ How can I call the lone night good, _5 Though thy sweet wishes wing its flight?
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Be thou, Spirit fierce,
    My spirit!
    ^ Be thou, Spirit fierce, My spirit!
    • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY A POET'S ANTHOLOGY 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.literary-excellence.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I fear thy kisses, gentle maiden, Thou needest not fear mine; My spirit is too deeply laden Ever to burthen thine.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    Be thou me, impetuous one!
    • St. V
  • The trumpet of a prophecy! O Wind,
    If Winter comes, can Spring be far behind?
    • St. V

The Mask of Anarchy (1819)

  • As I lay asleep in Italy
    There came a voice from over the Sea,
    And with great power it forth led me
    To walk in the visions of Poesy.
    • St. 1
  • I met Murder on the way —
    He had a mask like Castlereagh —
    Very smooth he looked, yet grim;
    Seven blood-hounds followed him.
    • St. 2
  • All were fat; and well they might
    Be in admirable plight,
    For one by one, and two by two,
    He tossed them human hearts to chew.
    • St. 3
  • And many more Destructions played
    In this ghastly masquerade,
    All disguised, even to the eyes,
    Like Bishops, lawyers, peers, or spies.
    • St. 7
  • Last came Anarchy: he rode
    On a white horse, splashed with blood;
    He was pale even to the lips,
    Like Death in the Apocalypse.
    • St. 8
  • And he wore a kingly crown;
    And in his grasp a sceptre shone;
    On his brow this mark I saw —
    'I AM GOD, AND KING, AND LAW!'
    • St. 9
  • And with glorious triumph, they
    Rode through England proud and gay,
    Drunk as with intoxication
    Of the wine of desolation.
    • St. 12
  • My father Time is weak and gray
    With waiting for a better day;
    See how idiot-like he stands,
    Fumbling with his palsied hands!
    • St. 23
  • What is Freedom? — ye can tell
    .That which slavery is, too well —

    For its very name has grown
    To an echo of your own.^ That which slavery is, too well — For its very name has grown To an echo of your own.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Your family and friends will get a kick when they hear their own name being sung in 'Happy Birthday'!!
    • *�*  Wilson's Almanac free daily ezine | Book of Days | August 4 |Loch-mo-Naire pilgrimage King Sebastian Sebastianism Sebastianists de SotoQuigate sun-worshippers priory Walsingham Mary apparition 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.wilsonsalmanac.com [Source type: General]

    • St. 39
  • Thou art Justice — ne'er for gold
    May thy righteous laws be sold
    As laws are in England — thou
    Shield'st alike the high and low.
    • St. 57
  • What if English toil and blood
    Was poured forth, even as a flood?
    It availed, Oh, Liberty,
    To dim, but not extinguish thee.
    • St. 60
  • Spirit, Patience, Gentleness,
    All that can adorn and bless
    Art thou — let deeds, not words, express
    Thine exceeding loveliness.
    • St. 64
  • Let the blue sky overhead,
    The green earth on which ye tread,
    All that must eternal be
    Witness the solemnity.
    • St. 66
  • From the haunts of daily life
    Where is waged the daily strife
    With common wants and common cares
    Which sows the human heart with tares.
    • St. 69
  • Be your strong and simple words
    Keen to wound as sharpened swords,
    And wide as targes let them be,
    With their shade to cover ye.
    • St. 74
  • Stand ye calm and resolute,
    Like a forest close and mute,
    With folded arms and looks which are
    Weapons of unvanquished war.
    • St. 79
  • The old laws of England — they
    Whose reverend heads with age are gray,
    Children of a wiser day;
    And whose solemn voice must be
    Thine own echo — Liberty!
    • St. 82
  • Rise like Lions after slumber
    In unvanquishable number —
    Shake your chains to earth like dew
    Which in sleep had fallen on you —
    Ye are many — they are few.
    • St. 91

The Cloud (1820)

Full text online
I bring fresh showers for the thirsting flowers,
From the seas and the streams...
I am the daughter of Earth and Water, and the nursling of the Sky;
I pass through the pores of the ocean and shores; I change, but I cannot die.
.
I silently laugh at my own cenotaph,
And out of the caverns of rain,
Like a child from the womb, like a ghost from the tomb,
I arise and unbuild it again.
  • I bring fresh showers for the thirsting flowers,
    From the seas and the streams;
    I bear light shade for the leaves when laid
    In their noonday dreams.

    From my wings are shaken the dews that waken
    The sweet buds every one,
    When rocked to rest on their mother's breast,
    As she dances about the sun.^ From my wings are shaken the dews that waken _5 The sweet buds every one, When rocked to rest on their mother's breast, As she dances about the sun.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And out of the caverns of rain, .
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And it opened its fan-like leaves to the light.
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]


    .I wield the flail of the lashing hail,
    And whiten the green plains under,
    And then again I dissolve it in rain,
    And laugh as I pass in thunder.
    ^ I wield the flail of the lashing hail, And whiten the green plains under, _10 And then again I dissolve it in rain, And laugh as I pass in thunder.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I wield the flail of the lashing hail, And whiten the green plains under, And then again I dissolve it in rain, And laugh as I pass in thunder.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Over the lakes and the plains, Wherever he dream, under mountain or stream, The Spirit he loves remains; And I all the while bask in Heaven's blue smile, Whilst he is dissolving in rains.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    • St. 1
  • I am the daughter of Earth and Water,
    And the nursling of the Sky;
    I pass through the pores of the ocean and shores;
    I change, but I cannot die.
    • St. 7
  • For after the rain when with never a stain
    The pavilion of Heaven is bare,
    And the winds and sunbeams with their convex gleams
    Build up the blue dome of air,
    I silently laugh at my own cenotaph,
    And out of the caverns of rain,
    Like a child from the womb, like a ghost from the tomb,
    I arise and unbuild it again.
    • St. 7 (A cenotaph is an empty tomb or a monument erected in honor of a person who is buried elsewhere)

To a Skylark (1821)

.
  • Hail to thee, blithe Spirit!^ Hail to thee, blithe Spirit!
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]


    Bird thou never wert,
    That from Heaven, or near it,
    Pourest thy full heart
    In profuse strains of unpremeditated art.
    • St. 1
  • And singing still dost soar, and soaring ever singest.
    • St. 2
  • Thou art unseen, but yet I hear thy shrill delight.
    • St. 4
  • We look before and after,
    And pine for what is not:
    Our sincerest laughter
    With some pain is fraught;
    Our sweetest songs are those that tell of saddest thought.
    • St. 18
  • Teach me half the gladness
    That thy brain must know,
    Such harmonious madness
    From my lips would flow
    The world should listen then — as I am listening now.
    • St. 21
The world's great age begins anew,
The golden years return,
The earth doth like a snake renew
Her winter weeds outworn...

Hellas (1821)

  • We are all Greeks. .Our laws, our literature, our religion, our arts have their root in Greece.
    • Preface
  • Life may change, but it may fly not;
    Hope may vanish, but can die not;
    Truth be veiled, but still it burneth;
    Love repulsed, — but it returneth!^ Our laws, our literature, our religion, our arts have their root in Greece.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Preface Life may change, but it may fly not; Hope may vanish, but can die not; Truth be veiled, but still it burneth; Love repulsed, — but it returneth!
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The Witch of Atlas , st. First our pleasures die — and then Our hopes, and then our fears — and when These are dead, the debt is due, Dust claims dust — and we die too.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    • l. .34
  • Kings are like stars — they rise and set, they have
    The worship of the world, but no repose.^ Kings are like stars — they rise and set, they have The worship of the world, but no repose.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Rise like Lions after slumber In unvanquishable number — Shake your chains to earth like dew Which in sleep had fallen on you — Ye are many — they are few.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ All the wide world, beside us, Show like multitudinous Puppets passing from a scene; What but mockery can they mean, Where I am--where thou hast been?
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    • l. .195
  • But Greece and her foundations are
    Built below the tide of war,
    Based on the crystalline sea
    Of thought and its eternity;
    Her citizens, imperial spirits,
    Rule the present from the past,
    On all this world of men inherits
    Their seal is set.^ But Greece and her foundations are Built below the tide of war, Based on the crystalline sea Of thought and its eternity; Her citizens, imperial spirits, Rule the present from the past, On all this world of men inherits Their seal is set.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The great of all ages are arraigned, and the spirit of the world is brought before us, while its heroes pass, unveil their faces for a moment, and are swallowed in the throng that has no ending.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 3/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ [HTML code] Copy all text in the text box below and paste into your website template or HTML file...
    • Silent Conversation Walkthrough Guide, Review, Discussion, Hints and Tips at Jay is Games 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC jayisgames.com [Source type: General]

    • l. .696-703
  • The world's great age begins anew,
    The golden years return,
    The earth doth like a snake renew
    Her winter weeds outworn;
    Heaven smiles, and faiths and empires gleam,
    Like wrecks of a dissolving dream.
    • l.^ The world's great age begins anew, The golden years return, The earth doth like a snake renew Her winter weeds outworn...
      • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ The world's great age begins anew, The golden years return, The earth doth like a snake renew Her winter weeds outworn; Heaven smiles, and faiths and empires gleam, Like wrecks of a dissolving dream.
      • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ The great of all ages are arraigned, and the spirit of the world is brought before us, while its heroes pass, unveil their faces for a moment, and are swallowed in the throng that has no ending.
      • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 3/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
      • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

      .1060
  • The world is weary of the past,
    Oh, might it die or rest at last!^ The world is weary of the past, Oh, might it die or rest at last!
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ At that moment, when life at last seemed about to offer him rest, unimpeded activity, and happiness, death robbed the world of his maturity.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 3/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    • Final chorus
I never was attached to that great sect, whose doctrine is, that each one should select out of the crowd a mistress or a friend, and all the rest, though fair and wise, commend to cold oblivion...

Epipsychidion (1821)

.
  • My Song, I fear that thou wilt find but few
    Who fitly shalt conceive thy reasoning,
    Of such hard matter dost thou entertain
    ;
    Whence, if by misadventure, chance should bring
    Thee to base company (as chance may do),
    Quite unaware of what thou dost contain,
    I prithee, comfort thy sweet self again,
    My last delight!^ My Song, I fear that thou wilt find but few Who fitly shalt conceive thy reasoning, Of such hard matter dost thou entertain ; Whence, if by misadventure, chance should bring Thee to base company (as chance may do), Quite unaware of what thou dost contain, I prithee, comfort thy sweet self again, My last delight!
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Who, from thy narrow cage, Pourest such music, that it might assuage The rugged hearts of those who prisoned thee, Were they not deaf to all sweet melody.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Out of the misty eastern cave Where, all the long and lone daylight, Thou wovest dreams of joy and fear, Which make thee terrible and dear, — Swift be thy flight!
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    tell them that they are dull,
    .And bid them own that thou art beautiful.
    • Dedication
  • Poor captive bird!^ Dedication Poor captive bird!
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And bid them own that thou art beautiful.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Spirit of BEAUTY, that dost consecrate With thine own hues all thou dost shine upon Of human thought or form,--where art thou gone?
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Who, from thy narrow cage,
    Pourest such music, that it might assuage
    The rugged hearts of those who prisoned thee,
    Were they not deaf to all sweet melody.
    • l.^ All those who love—and who e’er loved like thee, .
      • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Pourest thy full heart .
      • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

      ^ All but those who need thee not.
      • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

      .9
  • I never thought before my death to see
    Youth's vision thus made perfect.^ I never thought before my death to see Youth's vision thus made perfect.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In short, we have now a perfect plaything for the summer.'--It was thus that short-sighted mortals welcomed Death, he having disguised his grim form in a pleasing mask!
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A vision strange such towers to see, Sculptured and wrought so gorgeously, _55 Where human art could never be.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    • l. 41
.
Love is like understanding, that grows bright, gazing on many truths...
  • Thy wisdom speaks in me, and bids me dare
    Beacon the rocks on which high hearts are wreckt.^ Love is like understanding, that grows bright, gazing on many truths...
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Love is like understanding, that grows bright, Gazing on many truths ; 'tis like thy light, Imagination!
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Thy wisdom speaks in me, and bids me dare Beacon the rocks on which high hearts are wreckt.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]


    .I never was attached to that great sect,
    Whose doctrine is, that each one should select
    Out of the crowd a mistress or a friend,
    And all the rest, though fair and wise, commend
    To cold oblivion
    , though it is in the code
    Of modern morals, and the beaten road
    Which those poor slaves with weary footsteps tread,
    Who travel to their home among the dead
    By the broad highway of the world, and so
    With one chained friend, — perhaps a jealous foe,
    The dreariest and the longest journey go.^ Final chorus I never was attached to that great sect, whose doctrine is, that each one should select out of the crowd a mistress or a friend, and all the rest, though fair and wise, commend to cold oblivion...
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I never was attached to that great sect, Whose doctrine is, that each one should select Out of the crowd a mistress or a friend, And all the rest, though fair and wise, commend To cold oblivion , though it is in the code Of modern morals, and the beaten road Which those poor slaves with weary footsteps tread, Who travel to their home among the dead By the broad highway of the world, and so With one chained friend, — perhaps a jealous foe, The dreariest and the longest journey go.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Stranger yet, To those who know not Nature nor deduce The future from the present, it may seem, That not one slave, who suffers from the crimes Of this unnatural being, not one wretch, Whose children famish and whose nuptial bed Is earth’s unpitying bosom, rears an arm To dash him from his throne!
    • Queen Mab by Percy Bysshe Shelley 1813 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.marxists.org [Source type: Original source]

    • l. 147
.
If you divide suffering and dross, you may diminish till it is consumed away; If you divide pleasure and love and thought, each part exceeds the whole; and we know not how much, while any yet remains unshared...
  • True Love in this differs from gold and clay,
    That to divide is not to take away.^ True Love in this differs from gold and clay, That to divide is not to take away.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Much yet remains unscanned.
    • Queen Mab by Percy Bysshe Shelley 1813 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.marxists.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ If you divide suffering and dross, you may diminish till it is consumed away; If you divide pleasure and love and thought, each part exceeds the whole; and we know not how much, while any yet remains unshared...
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]


    .Love is like understanding, that grows bright,
    Gazing on many truths
    ; 'tis like thy light,
    Imagination!^ Love is like understanding, that grows bright, gazing on many truths...
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Love is like understanding, that grows bright, Gazing on many truths ; 'tis like thy light, Imagination!
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Bid thy bright Heaven above, Whilst light and darkness bound it, Be their tomb who planned To make it ours and thine!
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    which from earth and sky,
    And from the depths of human phantasy,
    As from a thousand prisms and mirrors, fills
    The Universe with glorious beams, and kills
    Error, the worm, with many a sun-like arrow
    Of its reverberated lightning.
.
Bid them love each other and be blest:
And leave the troop which errs, and which reproves,
And come and be my guest, — for I am Love's.
  • Mind from its object differs most in this:
    Evil from good; misery from happiness;
    The baser from the nobler; the impure
    And frail, from what is clear and must endure.^ The night is good; because, my love, .
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And bid them love each other and be blest: And leave the troop which errs, and which reproves, And come and be my guest, — for I am Love's.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Mind from its object differs most in this: Evil from good; misery from happiness; The baser from the nobler; the impure And frail, from what is clear and must endure.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]


    .If you divide suffering and dross, you may
    Diminish till it is consumed away;
    If you divide pleasure and love and thought,
    Each part exceeds the whole; and we know not
    How much, while any yet remains unshared,
    Of pleasure may be gained, of sorrow spared:
    This truth is that deep well, whence sages draw
    The unenvied light of hope; the eternal law
    By which those live, to whom this world of life
    Is as a garden ravaged
    , and whose strife
    Tills for the promise of a later birth
    The wilderness of this Elysian earth.
    ^ If you divide suffering and dross, you may Diminish till it is consumed away; If you divide pleasure and love and thought, Each part exceeds the whole; and we know not How much, while any yet remains unshared, Of pleasure may be gained, of sorrow spared: This truth is that deep well, whence sages draw The unenvied light of hope; the eternal law By which those live, to whom this world of life Is as a garden ravaged , and whose strife Tills for the promise of a later birth The wilderness of this Elysian earth.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Much yet remains unscanned.
    • Queen Mab by Percy Bysshe Shelley 1813 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.marxists.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ If you divide suffering and dross, you may diminish till it is consumed away; If you divide pleasure and love and thought, each part exceeds the whole; and we know not how much, while any yet remains unshared...
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    • l. .174
  • Love's very pain is sweet,
    But its reward is in the world divine
    Which, if not here, it builds beyond the grave.^ Love's very pain is sweet , But its reward is in the world divine Which, if not here, it builds beyond the grave.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ To spend years thus, and be rewarded, _15 As thou, sweet love, requited me When none were near--Oh!
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Sweet views which in our world above Can never well be seen, _70 Were imaged by the water's love Of that fair forest green.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    • l. .595
  • And bid them love each other and be blest:
    And leave the troop which errs, and which reproves,
    And come and be my guest, — for I am Love's.
    • l.^ And bid them love each other and be blest: And leave the troop which errs, and which reproves, And come and be my guest, — for I am Love's.
      • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Bid them love each other and be blest: And leave the troop which errs, and which reproves, And come and be my guest, — for I am Love's.
      • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ To hearts which near each other move From evening close to morning light, _10 The night is good; because, my love, They never SAY good-night.
      • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

      602
He lives, he wakes — 'tis Death is dead, not he...

Adonais (1821)

.
  • I weep for Adonais — he is dead!
    O, weep for Adonais!^ I weep for Adonais — he is dead!
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    though our tears
    .Thaw not the frost which binds so dear a head!^ Thaw not the frost which binds so dear a head!
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    • St. I
  • Till the Future dares
    Forget the Past, his fate and fame shall be
    An echo and a light unto eternity!
    • St. I
  • Most musical of mourners, weep again!
    • St. IV
  • To that high Capital, where kingly Death
    Keeps his pale court in beauty and decay,
    He came.
    • St. VI
  • Lost Angel of a ruined Paradise!
    .She knew not 'twas her own; as with no stain
    She faded, like a cloud which had outwept its rain.
    ^ She knew not 'twas her own; as with no stain She faded, like a cloud which had outwept its rain.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ 'Like a cloud big with a May shower, My soul weeps healing rain On thee, thou withered flower!
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In the cave which wild weeds cover Wait for thine aethereal lover; For the pallid moon is waning, O'er the spiral cypress hanging And the moon no cloud is staining.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    • St. X
  • And others came... .Desires and Adorations,
    Winged Persuasions and veiled Destinies,
    Splendours, and GloOms, and glimmering Incarnations
    Of hopes and fears, and twilight Phantasies;
    And Sorrow, with her family of Sighs,
    And Pleasure, blind with tears, led by the gleam
    Of her own dying smile instead of eyes,
    Came in slow pomp; — the moving pomp might seem
    Like pageantry of mist on an autumnal stream.
    ^ Desires and Adorations, Winged Persuasions and veiled Destinies, Splendours, and GloOms, and glimmering Incarnations Of hopes and fears, and twilight Phantasies; And Sorrow, with her family of Sighs, And Pleasure, blind with tears, led by the gleam Of her own dying smile instead of eyes, Came in slow pomp; — the moving pomp might seem Like pageantry of mist on an autumnal stream.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And frowns and smiles and splendours not their own, .
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The Witch of Atlas , st. First our pleasures die — and then Our hopes, and then our fears — and when These are dead, the debt is due, Dust claims dust — and we die too.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    • St. XIII
  • Ah, woe is me! .Winter is come and gone,
    But grief returns with the revolving year.
    ^ Winter is come and gone, But grief returns with the revolving year.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The world's great age begins anew, The golden years return, The earth doth like a snake renew Her winter weeds outworn...
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ No news of your false spring _5 To my heart's winter bring, Once having gone, in vain Ye come again.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    • St. XVIII
  • The intense atom glows
    A moment, then is quenched in a most cold repose.
    • St. XX
  • Alas! that all we loved of him should be,
    .But for our grief, as if it had not been,
    And grief itself be mortal!
    ^ But for our grief, as if it had not been, And grief itself be mortal!
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ All things that we love and cherish, Like ourselves must fade and perish; Such is our rude mortal lot-- Love itself would, did they not.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    Woe is me!
    Whence are we, and why are we? of what scene
    The actors or spectators?
    • St. XXI
  • As long as skies are blue, and fields are green,
    Evening must usher night, night urge the morrow,
    Month follow month with woe, and year wake year to sorrow.
    • St. XXI
  • The Pilgrim of Eternity, whose fame
    Over his living head like Heaven is bent,
    An early but enduring monument,
    Came, veiling all the lightnings of his song
    In sorrow.
    • St. XXX
  • A pardlike Spirit beautiful and swift —
    A Love in desolation masked; — a Power
    Girt round with weakness; — it can scarce uplift
    The weight of the superincumbent hour;
    It is a dying lamp, a falling shower,
    A breaking billow; — even whilst we speak
    Is it not broken? .On the withering flower
    The killing sun smiles brightly: on a cheek
    The life can burn in blood, even while the heart may break.
    ^ On the withering flower The killing sun smiles brightly: on a cheek The life can burn in blood, even while the heart may break.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 3/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ 'Like a cloud big with a May shower, My soul weeps healing rain On thee, thou withered flower!
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Even while I write, my burning cheeks are wet.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    • St. XXXII
  • What softer voice is hushed over the dead?
    .Athwart what brow is that dark mantle thrown?^ Athwart what brow is that dark mantle thrown?
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]


    .What form leans sadly o'er the white death — bed,
    In mockery of monumental stone,
    The heavy heart heaving without a moan?
    ^ What form leans sadly o'er the white death — bed, In mockery of monumental stone, The heavy heart heaving without a moan?
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Whose stingings bade thy heart look further still, When, to the moonlight walk by Henry led, Sweetly and sadly thou didst talk of death?
    • Queen Mab by Percy Bysshe Shelley 1813 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.marxists.org [Source type: Original source]

    • St. XXXV
.
He is made one with Nature: there is heard His voice in all her music...
  • Peace, peace!^ He is made one with Nature: there is heard His voice in all her music, from the moan Of thunder, to the song of night's sweet bird.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ XXXV He is made one with Nature: there is heard His voice in all her music...
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ All was of one piece in Shelley's nature.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 1/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    he is not dead, he doth not sleep —
    He hath awakened from the dream of life.
    • St. XXXIX
  • He has outsoared the shadow of our night;
    Envy and calumny and hate and pain,
    And that unrest which men miscall delight,
    Can touch him not and torture not again;
    From the contagion of the world's slow stain
    He is secure, and now can never mourn
    A heart grown cold, a head grown grey in vain.
    • St. XL
  • He lives, he wakes — 'tis Death is dead, not he;
    Mourn not for Adonais. — .Thou young Dawn,
    Turn all thy dew to splendour, for from thee
    The spirit thou lamentest is not gone.
    ^ Thou young Dawn, Turn all thy dew to splendour, for from thee The spirit thou lamentest is not gone.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Turn thee, surpassing Spirit!
    • Queen Mab by Percy Bysshe Shelley 1813 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.marxists.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He lives, he wakes--'tis Death is dead, not he; Mourn not for Adonais.--Thou young Dawn, Turn all thy dew to splendour, for from thee The spirit thou lamentest is not gone; Ye caverns and ye forests, cease to moan!
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 3/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    • St. XLI
The One remains, the many change and pass;
Heaven's light forever shines, Earth's shadows fly;
Life, like a dome of many-coloured glass,
Stains the white radiance of Eternity...
  • He is made one with Nature: there is heard
    His voice in all her music, from the moan
    Of thunder, to the song of night's sweet bird.
    • St. XLII
  • He is a portion of the loveliness
    Which once he made more lovely.
    • St. XLIII
  • The One remains, the many change and pass;
    Heaven's light forever shines, Earth's shadows fly;
    Life, like a dome of many-coloured glass,
    Stains the white radiance of Eternity,
    Until Death tramples it to fragments.
    • St. LII
  • The soul of Adonais, like a star,
    Beacons from the abode where the Eternal are.
    • St. LV
.
Rarely, rarely, comest thou,
Spirit of Delight!
^ Rarely, rarely, comest thou, Spirit of Delight!
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
  • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

^ LV Rarely, rarely, comest thou, Spirit of Delight!
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

^ I love all that thou lovest, _25 Spirit of Delight!
  • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]


Wherefore hast thou left me now
Many a day and night?

Song: Rarely, Rarely, Comest Thou (1821)

.
  • Rarely, rarely, comest thou,
    Spirit of Delight!^ Rarely, rarely, comest thou, Spirit of Delight!
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ LV Rarely, rarely, comest thou, Spirit of Delight!
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I love all that thou lovest, _25 Spirit of Delight!
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]


    .Wherefore hast thou left me now
    Many a day and night?

    Many a weary night and day
    'Tis since thou are fled away.^ Many a weary night and day 'Tis since thou are fled away.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Many a weary night and day _5 'Tis since thou art fled away.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Wherefore hast thou left me now Many a day and night?
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    • St. 1
  • Let me set my mournful ditty
    To a merry measure;
    Thou wilt never come for pity,
    Thou wilt come for pleasure;
    Pity then will cut away
    Those cruel wings, and thou wilt stay.
    • St. 4
.
I love Love — though he has wings, and like light can flee...
  • I love tranquil solitude,
    And such society
    As is quiet, wise, and good;
    Between thee and me
    What difference?^ I love Love — though he has wings, and like light can flee...
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I love Love--though he has wings, And like light can flee, But above all other things, _45 Spirit, I love thee-- Thou art love and life!
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I love tranquil solitude, And such society As is quiet, wise, and good Between thee and me _40 What difference?
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    but thou dost possess
    .The things I seek, not love them less.^ The things I seek, not love them less.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    • St. 7
  • I love Love — though he has wings,
    And like light can flee
    ,
    But above all other things,
    Spirit, I love thee —
    Thou art love and life! .Oh come,
    Make once more my heart thy home.
    ^ Oh, come, Make once more my heart thy home.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Oh come, Make once more my heart thy home.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ From thy nest every rafter Will rot, and thine eagle home _30 Leave thee naked to laughter, When leaves fall and cold winds come.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    • St. 8
Poets are the hierophants of an unapprehended inspiration; the mirrors of the gigantic shadows which futurity casts upon the present...

A Defence of Poetry (1821)

.
  • Reason respects the differences, and imagination the similitudes of things.
  • The pleasure that is in sorrow is sweeter than the pleasure of pleasure itself.
  • Poetry is a mirror which makes beautiful that which is distorted.
  • Revenge is the naked idol of the worship of a semi-barbarous age.
  • Poetry lifts the veil from the hidden beauty of the world, and makes familiar objects be as if they were not familiar.
  • Tragedy delights by affording a shadow of the pleasure which exists in pain.
  • Poetry is the record of the best and happiest moments of the happiest and best minds.
  • A poet is a nightingale, who sits in darkness and sings to cheer its own solitude with sweet sounds.^ The pleasure that is in sorrow is sweeter than the pleasure of pleasure itself.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Poetry is a mirror which makes beautiful that which is distorted.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A poet is a nightingale, who sits in darkness and sings to cheer its own solitude with sweet sounds.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .His auditors are as men entranced by the melody of an unseen musician.
  • The life of Camillus, the death of Regulus; the expectation of the senators, in their godlike state, of the victorious Gauls; the refusal of the republic to make peace with Hannibal, after the battle of Cannae, were not the consequences of a refined calculation of the probable personal advantage to result from such a rhythm and order in the shows of life, to those who were at once the poets and the actors of these immortal dramas.^ His auditors are as men entranced by the melody of an unseen musician.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The life of Camillus, the death of Regulus; the expectation of the senators, in their godlike state, of the victorious Gauls; the refusal of the republic to make peace with Hannibal, after the battle of Cannae, were not the consequences of a refined calculation of the probable personal advantage to result from such a rhythm and order in the shows of life, to those who were at once the poets and the actors of these immortal dramas.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Who, from thy narrow cage, Pourest such music, that it might assuage The rugged hearts of those who prisoned thee, Were they not deaf to all sweet melody.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .The imagination beholding the beauty of this order, created it out of itself according to its own idea; the consequence was empire, and the reward everlasting fame.^ The imagination beholding the beauty of this order, created it out of itself according to its own idea; the consequence was empire, and the reward everlasting fame.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .These things are not the less poetry, quia carent vate sacro [because they lack a sacred bard].^ These things are not the less poetry, quia carent vate sacro [because they lack a sacred bard].
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .They are the episodes of that cyclic poem written by Time upon the memories of men.^ They are the episodes of that cyclic poem written by Time upon the memories of men.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ This passage has sometimes been paraphrased as "History is a cyclic poem written by Time upon the memories of man."
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And they lie black as mummies on which Time has written .
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • This passage has sometimes been paraphrased as "History is a cyclic poem written by Time upon the memories of man."
  • Poets are the hierophants of an unapprehended inspiration; the mirrors of the gigantic shadows which futurity casts upon the present; the words which express what they understand not; the trumpets which sing to battle, and feel not what they inspire; the influence which is moved not, but moves.^ They are the episodes of that cyclic poem written by Time upon the memories of men.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Poets are the hierophants of an unapprehended inspiration; the mirrors of the gigantic shadows which futurity casts upon the present...
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Poets are the hierophants of an unapprehended inspiration; the mirrors of the gigantic shadows which futurity casts upon the present; the words which express what they understand not; the trumpets which sing to battle, and feel not what they inspire; the influence which is moved not, but moves.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    Poets are the unacknowledged legislators of the world.

To Jane: The Invitation (1822)

.
  • Best and brightest, come away!^ Best and brightest, come away!
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Dearest, best and brightest, Come away, To the woods and to the fields!
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    • l. .1
  • And like a prophetess of May
    Strewed flowers upon the barren way,
    Making the wintry world appear
    Like one on whom thou smilest, dear.^ And like a prophetess of May Strewed flowers upon the barren way, Making the wintry world appear Like one on whom thou smilest, dear.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The brightest hour of unborn Spring, Through the winter wandering, Found, it seems, the halcyon Morn To hoar February born, _10 Bending from Heaven, in azure mirth, It kissed the forehead of the Earth, And smiled upon the silent sea, And bade the frozen streams be free, And waked to music all their fountains, _15 And breathed upon the frozen mountains, And like a prophetess of May Strewed flowers upon the barren way, Making the wintry world appear Like one on whom thou smilest, dear.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The eldest of the Hours of Spring, Into the Winter wandering, _10 Looks upon the leafless wood, And the banks all bare and rude; Found, it seems, this halcyon Morn In February's bosom born, Bending from Heaven, in azure mirth, _15 Kissed the cold forehead of the Earth, And smiled upon the silent sea, And bade the frozen streams be free; And waked to music all the fountains, And breathed upon the rigid mountains, _20 And made the wintry world appear Like one on whom thou smilest, Dear.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    • l. .17
  • Away, away, from men and towns,
    To the wild wood and the downs —
    To the silent wilderness
    Where the soul need not repress
    Its music lest it should not find
    An echo in another’s mind.^ Away, away, from men and towns, To the wild wood and the downs-- To the silent wilderness Where the soul need not repress Its music lest it should not find _25 An echo in another's mind, While the touch of Nature's art Harmonizes heart to heart.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Away, away, from men and towns, To the wild wood and the downs — To the silent wilderness Where the soul need not repress Its music lest it should not find An echo in another’s mind.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And every motion, odour, beam, and tone, With that deep music is in unison: Which is a soul within a soul--they seem Like echoes of an antenatal dream.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    • l. .21
  • I am gone into the fields
    To take what this sweet hour yields; —
    Reflection, you may come to-morrow,
    Sit by the fireside with Sorrow.^ I am gone into the fields To take what this sweet hour yields; — Reflection, you may come to-morrow, Sit by the fireside with Sorrow.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I leave this notice on my door For each accustomed visitor:-- _30 'I am gone into the fields To take what this sweet hour yields;-- Reflection, you may come to-morrow, Sit by the fireside with Sorrow.-- You with the unpaid bill, Despair,-- You, tiresome verse-reciter, Care,-- _35 I will pay you in the grave,-- Death will listen to your stave.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Because the moment you get hit, your A+ turns into an A, and then it takes a lot more than a single missed word to get it to change.
    • Silent Conversation Walkthrough Guide, Review, Discussion, Hints and Tips at Jay is Games 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC jayisgames.com [Source type: General]


    .You with the unpaid bill, Despair, —
    You, tiresome verse-reciter, Care, —
    I will pay you in the grave, —
    Death will listen to your stave.
    ^ You with the unpaid bill, Despair, — You, tiresome verse-reciter, Care, — I will pay you in the grave, — Death will listen to your stave.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I leave this notice on my door For each accustomed visitor:-- _30 'I am gone into the fields To take what this sweet hour yields;-- Reflection, you may come to-morrow, Sit by the fireside with Sorrow.-- You with the unpaid bill, Despair,-- You, tiresome verse-reciter, Care,-- _35 I will pay you in the grave,-- Death will listen to your stave.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Sweet lips, could my heart have hidden That its life was crushed by you, Ye would not have then forbidden The death which a heart so true Sought in your briny dew.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    • l. 31

Essay on Christianity (1859)

The Being who has influenced in the most memorable manner the opinions and the fortunes of the human species, is Jesus Christ.
Unfinished essay (c. .1815), first published in Shelley Memorials: From Authentic Sources (1859) edited by Lady Jane Gibson Shelley; also in The Works of Shelley in Verse and Prose (1880) , edited by H. Buxton Forman.^ Shelley memorials : from authentic sources / edited by Lady Shelley ; to which is added an Essay on Christianity, by Percy Bysshe Shelley, now first printed.

^ Poetical works of Percy Bysshe Shelley / edited by Harry Buxton Forman.

^ Shelley Memorials, edited by Lady Shelley.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 1/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

Full essay online
.
  • The Being who has influenced in the most memorable manner the opinions and the fortunes of the human species, is Jesus Christ. At this day, his name is connected with the devotional feelings of two hundred millions of the race of man.^ At this day, his name is connected with the devotional feelings of two hundred millions of the race of man.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Full essay online The Being who has influenced in the most memorable manner the opinions and the fortunes of the human species, is Jesus Christ .
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The Being who has influenced in the most memorable manner the opinions and the fortunes of the human species, is Jesus Christ .
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .The institutions of the most civilized portions of the globe derive their authority from the sanction of his doctrines; he is the hero, the God, of our popular religion.^ The institutions of the most civilized portions of the globe derive their authority from the sanction of his doctrines; he is the hero, the God, of our popular religion.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ If there is the slightest overbalance of happiness, which can be allotted to the most atrocious offender, consistently with the nature of things, that is rigidly made his portion by the ever-watchful Power of God.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is the characteristic of a cold and tame spirit to imagine that such doctrines as Jesus Christ promulgated are destined to follow the fortunes and share the extinction of a popular religion.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .His extraordinary genius, the wide and rapid effect of his unexampled doctrines, his invincible gentleness and benignity, the devoted love borne to him by his adherents, suggested a persuasion to them that he was something divine.^ His extraordinary genius, the wide and rapid effect of his unexampled doctrines, his invincible gentleness and benignity, the devoted love borne to him by his adherents, suggested a persuasion to them that he was something divine.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ His ex­traor­di­nary ge­nius, the wide and rapid ef­fects of his un­ex­am­pled doc­trines, his in­vin­ci­ble gen­tle­ness and be­nig­ni­ty, (and) the de­vot­ed love borne to him by his ad­her­ents.” .
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley as a Philosopher and Reformer by Sotheran, Charles - Pages 1-70 | Lexcycle 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.lexcycle.com [Source type: Original source]

    .The supernatural events which the historians of this wonderful man subsequently asserted to have been connected with every gradation of his career, established the opinion.
  • The thoughts which the word "God" suggests to the human mind are susceptible of as many variations as human minds themselves. The Stoic, the Platonist, and the Epicurean, the Polytheist, the Dualist, and the Trinitarian, differ infinitely in their conceptions of its meaning.^ The thoughts which the word "God" suggests to the human mind are susceptible of as many variations as human minds themselves.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The supernatural events which the historians of this wonderful man subsequently asserted to have been connected with every gradation of his career, established the opinion.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The Stoic , the Platonist , and the Epicurean , the Polytheist , the Dualist , and the Trinitarian , differ infinitely in their conceptions of its meaning.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .They agree only in considering it the most awful and most venerable of names, as a common term devised to express all of mystery, or majesty, or power, which the invisible world contains.^ They agree only in considering it the most awful and most venerable of names, as a common term devised to express all of mystery, or majesty, or power, which the invisible world contains.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ They agree on­ly in con­sid­er­ing it the most aw­ful and most ven­er­able of names, as a com­mon term to ex­press all of mys­tery, or majesty, or pow­er, which the in­vis­ible world con­tains.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley as a Philosopher and Reformer by Sotheran, Charles - Pages 1-70 | Lexcycle 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.lexcycle.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is urged that they ought to have proceeded by the legal method of calling witnesses; and that the sentence was not only out of all proportion to the offence, but that it ought not to have been executed till persuasion had been tried.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 1/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    And not only has every sect distinct conceptions of the application of this name, but scarcely two individuals of the same sect, who exercise in any degree the freedom of their judgment, or yield themselves with any candour of feeling to the influences of the visible world, find perfect coincidence of opinion to exist between them.
.
The author of the Christian system had a conception widely differing from the gross imaginations of the vulgar relatively to the ruling Power of the universe.
^ It is important to observe that the author of the Christian system had a conception widely differing from the gross imaginations of the vulgar relatively to the ruling Power of the universe.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The author of the Christian system had a conception widely differing from the gross imaginations of the vulgar relatively to the ruling Power of the universe.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

.He everywhere represents this Power as something mysteriously and illimitably pervading the frame of things.
  • It is important to observe that the author of the Christian system had a conception widely differing from the gross imaginations of the vulgar relatively to the ruling Power of the universe.^ He everywhere represents this Power as something mysteriously and illimitably pervading the frame of things.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is important to observe that the author of the Christian system had a conception widely differing from the gross imaginations of the vulgar relatively to the ruling Power of the universe.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The author of the Christian system had a conception widely differing from the gross imaginations of the vulgar relatively to the ruling Power of the universe.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .He everywhere represents this Power as something mysteriously and illimitably pervading the frame of things.
    Nor do his doctrines practically assume any proposition which they theoretically deny.^ He everywhere represents this Power as something mysteriously and illimitably pervading the frame of things.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Nor do his doctrines practically assume any proposition which they theoretically deny.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ They do not represent God as a limitless and inconceivable mystery; affirming, at the same time, his existence as a Being subject to passion...
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .They do not represent God as a limitless and inconceivable mystery; affirming, at the same time, his existence as a Being subject to passion...
  • "Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God."^ They do not represent God as a limitless and inconceivable mystery; affirming, at the same time, his existence as a Being subject to passion...
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God."
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Such as these shall see God.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Blessed are those who have preserved internal sanctity of soul; who are conscious of no secret deceit; who are the same in act as they are in desire; who conceal no thought, no tendencies of thought, from their own conscience; who are faithful and sincere witnesses, before the tribunal of their own judgments, of all that passes within their mind.^ Blessed are those who have preserved internal sanctity of soul; who are conscious of no secret deceit; who are the same in act as they are in desire; who conceal no thought, no tendencies of thought, from their own conscience; who are faithful and sincere witnesses, before the tribunal of their own judgments, of all that passes within their mind.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Human life, with all its unreal ills and transitory hopes, is as a dream, which departs before the dawn, leaving no trace of its evanescent lines.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Who, from thy narrow cage, Pourest such music, that it might assuage The rugged hearts of those who prisoned thee, Were they not deaf to all sweet melody.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Such as these shall see God.
  • God, it has been asserted, was contemplated by Jesus Christ as every poet and every philosopher must have contemplated that mysterious principle.^ God, it has been asserted, was contemplated by Jesus Christ as every poet and every philosopher must have contemplated that mysterious principle.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Such as these shall see God.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is the characteristic of a cold and tame spirit to imagine that such doctrines as Jesus Christ promulgated are destined to follow the fortunes and share the extinction of a popular religion.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .He considered that venerable word to express the overruling Spirit of the collective energy of the moral and material world.
    He affirms, therefore, no more than that a simple, sincere mind is the indispensable requisite of true science and true happiness.^ He considered that venerable word to express the overruling Spirit of the collective energy of the moral and material world.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He affirms, therefore, no more than that a simple, sincere mind is the indispensable requisite of true science and true happiness.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Nature, and the world of man passes from thraldom and its degradation into limitless progression, or (as the phrase goes) perfectibility, moral and material .
    • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

    He affirms that a being of pure and gentle habits will not fail, in every thought, in every object of every thought, to be aware of benignant visitings from the invisible energies by which he is surrounded.
.
That those who are pure in heart shall see God, and that virtue is its own reward, may be considered as equivalent assertions.
^ That those who are pure in heart shall see God, and that virtue is its own reward, may be considered as equivalent assertions.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

^ "Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God."
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Such as these shall see God.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

.The former of these propositions is a metaphorical repetition of the latter.
  • Whosoever is free from the contamination of luxury and licence, may go forth to the fields and to the woods, inhaling joyous renovation from the breath of Spring, or catching from the odours and sounds of Autumn some diviner mood of sweetest sadness, which improves the softened heart.^ Whosoever is free from the contamination of luxury and licence, may go forth to the fields and to the woods, inhaling joyous renovation from the breath of Spring, or catching from the odours and sounds of Autumn some diviner mood of sweetest sadness, which improves the softened heart.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The former of these propositions is a metaphorical repetition of the latter.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Whoso­ev­er is free from the con­tam­ina­tion of lux­ury and li­cense may go forth to the fields and to the woods, in­hal­ing joy­ous ren­ova­tion from the breath of Spring, and catch­ing from the odors and sounds of au­tumn some di­vin­er mood of sweet­est sad­ness, which im­proves the soft­ened heart.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley as a Philosopher and Reformer by Sotheran, Charles - Pages 1-70 | Lexcycle 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.lexcycle.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Whosoever is no deceiver or destroyer of his fellow men — no liar, no flatterer, no murderer may walk among his species, deriving, from the communion with all which they contain of beautiful or of majestic, some intercourse with the Universal God.^ Whosoever is no deceiver or destroyer of his fellow men — no liar, no flatterer, no murderer may walk among his species, deriving, from the communion with all which they contain of beautiful or of majestic, some intercourse with the Universal God.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Whoso­ev­er is no de­ceiv­er and de­stroy­er of his fel­low-​men--no liar, no flat­ter­er, no mur­der­er--may walk among his species, de­riv­ing, from the com­mu­nion with all which they con­tain of beau­ti­ful or ma­jes­tic, some in­ter­course with the Uni­ver­sal God.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley as a Philosopher and Reformer by Sotheran, Charles - Pages 1-70 | Lexcycle 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.lexcycle.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ There is no doubt that the Fellows were satisfied of his being the real author; else they could not have ventured on so summary a measure as expulsion.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 1/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Whosoever has maintained with his own heart the strictest correspondence of confidence, who dares to examine and to estimate every imagination which suggests itself to his mind — whosoever is that which he designs to become, and only aspires to that which the divinity of his own nature shall consider and approve — he has already seen God.
  • We live and move and think; but we are not the creators of our own origin and existence.^ Whosoever has maintained with his own heart the strictest correspondence of confidence, who dares to examine and to estimate every imagination which suggests itself to his mind — whosoever is that which he designs to become, and only aspires to that which the divinity of his own nature shall consider and approve — he has already seen God.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ We live and move and think; but we are not the creators of our own origin and existence.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ We are not the arbiters of every motion of our own complicated nature; we are not the masters of our own imaginations and moods of mental being.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .We are not the arbiters of every motion of our own complicated nature; we are not the masters of our own imaginations and moods of mental being.
    There is a Power by which we are surrounded, like the atmosphere in which some motionless lyre is suspended, which visits with its breath our silent chords at will.^ There is a Power by which we are surrounded, like the atmosphere in which some motionless lyre is suspended, which visits with its breath our silent chords at will.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ We are not the arbiters of every motion of our own complicated nature; we are not the masters of our own imaginations and moods of mental being.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ This Power is God; and those who have seen God have, in the period of their purer and more perfect nature, been harmonized by their own will to so exquisite consentaneity of power as to give forth divinest melody, when the breath of universal being sweeps over their frame.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]


    .Our most imperial and stupendous qualities — those on which the majesty and the power of humanity is erected — are, relatively to the inferior portion of its mechanism, active and imperial; but they are the passive slaves of some higher and more omnipotent Power.^ Our most imperial and stupendous qualities — those on which the majesty and the power of humanity is erected — are, relatively to the inferior portion of its mechanism, active and imperial; but they are the passive slaves of some higher and more omnipotent Power.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Power, like a desolating pestilence, Pollutes whate'er it touches; and obedience, Bane of all genius, virtue, freedom, truth, Makes slaves of men, and of the human frame A mechanized automaton.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ See also: MATTER matter of genuine conviction on his individual See also: PART part ), this was only in deference to a higher and more imperious See also: STANDARD STANDARD, BATTLE OF THE standard of right .
    • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

    .This Power is God; and those who have seen God have, in the period of their purer and more perfect nature, been harmonized by their own will to so exquisite consentaneity of power as to give forth divinest melody, when the breath of universal being sweeps over their frame.^ This Power is God; and those who have seen God have, in the period of their purer and more perfect nature, been harmonized by their own will to so exquisite consentaneity of power as to give forth divinest melody, when the breath of universal being sweeps over their frame.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ We are not the arbiters of every motion of our own complicated nature; we are not the masters of our own imaginations and moods of mental being.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Whosoever has maintained with his own heart the strictest correspondence of confidence, who dares to examine and to estimate every imagination which suggests itself to his mind — whosoever is that which he designs to become, and only aspires to that which the divinity of his own nature shall consider and approve — he has already seen God.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .That those who are pure in heart shall see God, and that virtue is its own reward, may be considered as equivalent assertions.^ That those who are pure in heart shall see God, and that virtue is its own reward, may be considered as equivalent assertions.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God."
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Such as these shall see God.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .The former of these propositions is a metaphorical repetition of the latter.^ The former of these propositions is a metaphorical repetition of the latter.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .The advocates of literal interpretation have been the most efficacious enemies of those doctrines whose nature they profess to venerate.
  • Tacitus says, that the Jews held God to be something eternal and supreme, neither subject to change nor to decay; therefore, they permit no statues in their cities or their temples.^ The advocates of literal interpretation have been the most efficacious enemies of those doctrines whose nature they profess to venerate.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Tacitus says, that the Jews held God to be something eternal and supreme, neither subject to change nor to decay; therefore, they permit no statues in their cities or their temples.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The absurd and execrable doctrine of vengeance, in all its shapes , seems to have been contemplated by this great moralist with the profoundest disapprobation; nor would he permit the most venerable of names to be perverted into a sanction for the meanest and most contemptible propensities incident to the nature of man.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .The universal Being can only be described or defined by negatives which deny his subjection to the laws of all inferior existences.^ The universal Being can only be described or defined by negatives which deny his subjection to the laws of all inferior existences.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Byron described him as "bold as a lion;" and indeed it may here be said, once and for all, that Shelley's physical courage was only equalled by his moral fearlessness.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ What he clung to amid all perplexities was the absolute and indestructible existence of the universal as perceived by us in love, beauty, and delight.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    Where indefiniteness ends, idolatry and anthropomorphism begin.
.
This, and no other, is justice: — to consider, under all the circumstances and consequences of a particular case, how the greatest quantity and purest quality of happiness will ensue from any action ...
^ This, and no other, is justice: — to consider, under all the circumstances and consequences of a particular case, how the greatest quantity and purest quality of happiness will ensue from any action ...
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

^ This game isn't about shooting or action, so it's of no use to base it's quality on not having those elements.
  • Silent Conversation Walkthrough Guide, Review, Discussion, Hints and Tips at Jay is Games 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC jayisgames.com [Source type: General]

^ After this touch of his quality I no longer doubted his identity; a dead silence ensued; looking up, I asked,-- "'Where is he?'
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

there is no other justice.
.
  • The absurd and execrable doctrine of vengeance, in all its shapes, seems to have been contemplated by this great moralist with the profoundest disapprobation; nor would he permit the most venerable of names to be perverted into a sanction for the meanest and most contemptible propensities incident to the nature of man. "Love your enemies, bless those who curse you, that ye may be the sons of your Heavenly Father, who makes the sun to shine on the good and on the evil, and the rain to fall on the just and unjust."^ All those who love—and who e’er loved like thee, .
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Love your enemy, bless those who curse you:" such, he says, is the practice of God, and such must ye imitate if ye would be the children of God.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ All but those who need thee not.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    .How monstrous a calumny have not impostors dared to advance against the mild and gentle author of this just sentiment, and against the whole tenor of his doctrines and his life, overflowing with benevolence and forbearance and compassion!
  • My neighbour, or my servant, or my child, has done me an injury, and it is just that he should suffer an injury in return.^ My neighbour, or my servant, or my child, has done me an injury, and it is just that he should suffer an injury in return.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ How monstrous a calumny have not impostors dared to advance against the mild and gentle author of this just sentiment, and against the whole tenor of his doctrines and his life, overflowing with benevolence and forbearance and compassion!
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Where art thou, my gentle child?
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Such is the doctrine which Jesus Christ summoned his whole resources of persuasion to oppose.^ Such is the doctrine which Jesus Christ summoned his whole resources of persuasion to oppose.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It cannot be precisely ascertained in what degree Jesus Christ accommodated his doctrines to the opinions of his auditors; or in what degree he really said all that he is related to have said.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is the characteristic of a cold and tame spirit to imagine that such doctrines as Jesus Christ promulgated are destined to follow the fortunes and share the extinction of a popular religion.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ."Love your enemy, bless those who curse you:" such, he says, is the practice of God, and such must ye imitate if ye would be the children of God.
  • This, and no other, is justice: — to consider, under all the circumstances and consequences of a particular case, how the greatest quantity and purest quality of happiness will ensue from any action ...^ All those who love—and who e’er loved like thee, .
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ This, and no other, is justice: — to consider, under all the circumstances and consequences of a particular case, how the greatest quantity and purest quality of happiness will ensue from any action ...
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Love your enemy, bless those who curse you:" such, he says, is the practice of God, and such must ye imitate if ye would be the children of God.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    there is no other justice.
  • .
  • The nature of a narrow and malevolent spirit is so essentially incompatible with happiness as to render it inaccessible to the influences of the benignant God. All that his own perverse propensities will permit him to receive, that God abundantly pours forth upon him.^ The nature of a narrow and malevolent spirit is so essentially incompatible with happiness as to render it inaccessible to the influences of the benignant God.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ All that his own perverse propensities will permit him to receive, that God abundantly pours forth upon him.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ This Power is God; and those who have seen God have, in the period of their purer and more perfect nature, been harmonized by their own will to so exquisite consentaneity of power as to give forth divinest melody, when the breath of universal being sweeps over their frame.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .If there is the slightest overbalance of happiness, which can be allotted to the most atrocious offender, consistently with the nature of things, that is rigidly made his portion by the ever-watchful Power of God.^ If there is the slightest overbalance of happiness, which can be allotted to the most atrocious offender, consistently with the nature of things, that is rigidly made his portion by the ever-watchful Power of God.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ There was a Power in this sweet place, An Eve in this Eden; a ruling Grace Which to the flowers, did they waken or dream, Was as God is to the starry scheme.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Our happiness also corresponds with, and is adapted to, the nature of what is most excellent in our being.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    In every case, the human mind enjoys the utmost pleasure which it is capable of enjoying. God is represented by Jesus Christ as the Power from which, and through which, the streams of all that is excellent and delightful flow; the Power which models, as they pass, all the elements of this mixed universe to the purest and most perfect shape which it belongs to their nature to assume
  • This much is certain, that Jesus Christ represents God as the fountain of all goodness, the eternal enemy of pain and evil, the uniform and unchanging motive of the salutary operations of the material world.
.
The empire of evil spirits extends not beyond the boundaries of the grave.
^ The empire of evil spirits extends not beyond the boundaries of the grave.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

.The unobscured irradiations from the fountain-fire of all goodness shall reveal all that is mysterious and unintelligible, until the mutual communications of knowledge and of happiness throughout all thinking natures, constitute a harmony of good that ever varies and never ends.
  • It appears that we moulder to a heap of senseless dust; to a few worms, that arise and perish, like ourselves.^ It appears that we moulder to a heap of senseless dust; to a few worms, that arise and perish, like ourselves.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The unobscured irradiations from the fountain-fire of all goodness shall reveal all that is mysterious and unintelligible, until the mutual communications of knowledge and of happiness throughout all thinking natures, constitute a harmony of good that ever varies and never ends.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Like ourselves must fade and perish; .
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    .Jesus Christ asserts that these appearances are fallacious, and that a gloomy and cold imagination alone suggests the conception that thought can cease to be.
    Another and a more extensive state of being, rather than the complete extinction of being will follow from that mysterious change which we call Death.^ Jesus Christ asserts that these appearances are fallacious, and that a gloomy and cold imagination alone suggests the conception that thought can cease to be.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Another and a more extensive state of being, rather than the complete extinction of being will follow from that mysterious change which we call Death.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ His life was now spent more in thought than action--he had lost the eager spirit which believed it could achieve what it projected for the benefit of mankind.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    .There shall be no misery, no pain, no fear.^ There shall be no misery, no pain, no fear.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    The empire of evil spirits extends not beyond the boundaries of the grave. .The unobscured irradiations from the fountain-fire of all goodness shall reveal all that is mysterious and unintelligible, until the mutual communications of knowledge and of happiness throughout all thinking natures, constitute a harmony of good that ever varies and never ends.
  • This is Heaven, when pain and evil cease, and when the Benignant Principle, untrammelled and uncontrolled, visits in the fulness of its power the universal frame of things. Human life, with all its unreal ills and transitory hopes, is as a dream, which departs before the dawn, leaving no trace of its evanescent lines.
  • We die, says Jesus Christ; and, when we awaken from the languor of disease, the glories and the happiness of Paradise are around us.^ Human life, with all its unreal ills and transitory hopes, is as a dream, which departs before the dawn, leaving no trace of its evanescent lines.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ This is Heaven, when pain and evil cease, and when the Benignant Principle, untrammelled and uncontrolled, visits in the fulness of its power the universal frame of things.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Jesus Christ represented God as the principle of all good, the source of all happiness, the wise and benevolent Creator and Preserver of all living things.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .All evil and pain have ceased for ever.
    Our happiness also corresponds with, and is adapted to, the nature of what is most excellent in our being.^ Our happiness also corresponds with, and is adapted to, the nature of what is most excellent in our being.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ All evil and pain have ceased for ever.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ We are not the arbiters of every motion of our own complicated nature; we are not the masters of our own imaginations and moods of mental being.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .We see God, and we see that he is good.^ We see God, and we see that he is good.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .How delightful a picture, even if it be not true!^ How delightful a picture, even if it be not true!
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .How magnificent is the conception which this bold theory suggests to the contemplation, even if it be no more than the imagination of some sublimest and most holy poet, who, impressed with the loveliness and majesty of his own nature, is impatient and discontented with the narrow limits which this imperfect life and the dark grave have assigned for ever as his melancholy portion. It is not to be believed that Hell, or punishment, was the conception of this daring mind.^ Was there not more of what you might call Spinoza­ism in Wordsworth than even in Co­leridge, who spoke more of Spinoza?
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley as a Philosopher and Reformer by Sotheran, Charles - Pages 1-70 | Lexcycle 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.lexcycle.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Their intrinsic merit is almost less than nothing, and no one could predict from their perusal the course which the future poet of "The Cenci" and "Epipsychidion" was to take.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 1/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ His life was now spent more in thought than action--he had lost the eager spirit which believed it could achieve what it projected for the benefit of mankind.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    .It is not to be believed that the most prominent group of this picture, which is framed so heart-moving and lovely — the accomplishment of all human hope, the extinction of all morbid fear and anguish — would consist of millions of sensitive beings enduring, in every variety of torture which Omniscient vengeance could invent, immortal agony.
  • Jesus Christ opposed with earnest eloquence the panic fears and hateful superstitions which have enslaved mankind for ages. Nations had risen against nations, employing the subtlest devices of mechanism and mind to waste, and excruciate, and overthrow.^ It is not to be believed that the most prominent group of this picture, which is framed so heart-moving and lovely — the accomplishment of all human hope, the extinction of all morbid fear and anguish — would consist of millions of sensitive beings enduring, in every variety of torture which Omniscient vengeance could invent, immortal agony.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Jesus Christ opposed with earnest eloquence the panic fears and hateful superstitions which have enslaved mankind for ages.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Nations had risen against nations, employing the subtlest devices of mechanism and mind to waste, and excruciate, and overthrow.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .The great community of mankind had been subdivided into ten thousand communities, each organized for the ruin of the other.^ The great community of mankind had been subdivided into ten thousand communities, each organized for the ruin of the other.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Every man, in proportion to his virtue, considers himself, with respect to the great community of mankind, as the steward and guardian of their interests in the property which he chances to possess.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Wheel within wheel, the vast machine was instinct with the restless spirit of desolation.
  • If all the thought which had been expended on the construction of engines of agony and death — the modes of aggression and defence, the raising of armies, and the acquirement of those arts of tyranny and falsehood without which mixed multitudes could neither be led nor governed — had been employed to promote the true welfare and extend the real empire of man, how different would have been the present situation of human society!^ Wheel within wheel, the vast machine was instinct with the restless spirit of desolation.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I little thought how true their words would prove.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ If all the thought which had been expended on the construction of engines of agony and death — the modes of aggression and defence, the raising of armies, and the acquirement of those arts of tyranny and falsehood without which mixed multitudes could neither be led nor governed — had been employed to promote the true welfare and extend the real empire of man, how different would have been the present situation of human society!
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    how different the state of knowledge in physical and moral science, upon which the power and happiness of mankind essentially depend!
  • .
  • The emptiness and folly of retaliation are apparent from every example which can be brought forward.^ The emptiness and folly of retaliation are apparent from every example which can be brought forward.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ All the arguments which have been brought forward to justify retribution fail, when retribution is destined neither to operate as an example to other agents, nor to the offender himself.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Not only Jesus Christ, but the most eminent professors of every sect of philosophy, have reasoned against this futile superstition.^ Not only Jesus Christ, but the most eminent professors of every sect of philosophy, have reasoned against this futile superstition.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Jesus Christ did what every other reformer who has produced any considerable effect upon the world has done.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Full essay online The Being who has influenced in the most memorable manner the opinions and the fortunes of the human species, is Jesus Christ .
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    Legislation is, in one point of view, to be considered as an attempt to provide against the excesses of this deplorable mistake.
  • Mankind, transmitting from generation to generation the legacy of accumulated vengeances, and pursuing with the feelings of duty the misery of their fellow-beings, have not failed to attribute to the Universal Cause a character analogous with their own. The image of this invisible, mysterious Being is more or less excellent and perfect — resembles more or less its original — in proportion to the perfection of the mind on which it is impressed.
  • The conceptions which any nation or individual entertains of the God of its popular worship may be inferred from their own actions and opinions, which are the subjects of their approbation among their fellow-men. Jesus Christ instructed his disciples to be perfect, as their Father in Heaven is perfect, declaring at the same time his belief that human perfection requires the refraining from revenge and retribution in any of its various shapes.
.
Jesus Christ represented God as the principle of all good, the source of all happiness, the wise and benevolent Creator and Preserver of all living things...
  • God is a model through which the excellence of man is to be estimated, whilst the abstract perfection of the human character is the type of the actual perfection of the divine. It is not to be believed that a person of such comprehensive views as Jesus Christ could have fallen into so manifest a contradiction as to assert that men would be tortured after death by that Being whose character is held up as a model to human kind, because he is incapable of malevolence and revenge.^ God is a model through which the excellence of man is to be estimated, whilst the abstract perfection of the human character is the type of the actual perfection of the divine.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Jesus Christ represented God as the principle of all good, the source of all happiness, the wise and benevolent Creator and Preserver of all living things.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Jesus Christ represented God as the principle of all good, the source of all happiness, the wise and benevolent Creator and Preserver of all living things...
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .All the arguments which have been brought forward to justify retribution fail, when retribution is destined neither to operate as an example to other agents, nor to the offender himself.^ All the arguments which have been brought forward to justify retribution fail, when retribution is destined neither to operate as an example to other agents, nor to the offender himself.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The emptiness and folly of retaliation are apparent from every example which can be brought forward.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "All religions are good which make men good; and the way that a person ought to prove that his method of worshipping God is best, is for himself to be better than all other men."
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 1/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    .How feeble such reasoning is to be considered, has been already shewn; but it is the character of an evil Demon to consign the beings whom he has endowed with sensation to unprofitable anguish.
  • Jesus Christ represented God as the principle of all good, the source of all happiness, the wise and benevolent Creator and Preserver of all living things.^ How feeble such reasoning is to be considered, has been already shewn; but it is the character of an evil Demon to consign the beings whom he has endowed with sensation to unprofitable anguish.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Be free and be happy, but first be wise and good."
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 1/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Jesus Christ represented God as the principle of all good, the source of all happiness, the wise and benevolent Creator and Preserver of all living things.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .But the interpreters of his doctrines have confounded the good and the evil principle.
  • Jesus Christ expressly asserts that distinction between the good and evil principle which it has been the practice of all theologians to confound.^ Jesus Christ expressly asserts that distinction between the good and evil principle which it has been the practice of all theologians to confound.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But the interpreters of his doctrines have confounded the good and the evil principle.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is the characteristic of a cold and tame spirit to imagine that such doctrines as Jesus Christ promulgated are destined to follow the fortunes and share the extinction of a popular religion.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    How far his doctrines, or their interpretation, may be true, it would scarcely have been worth while to inquire, if the one did not afford an example and an incentive to the attainment of true virtue, whilst the other holds out a sanction and apology for every species of mean and cruel vice.
.
Every fanatic or enemy of virtue is not at liberty to misrepresent the greatest geniuses and most heroic defenders of all that is valuable in this mortal world.
  • It cannot be precisely ascertained in what degree Jesus Christ accommodated his doctrines to the opinions of his auditors; or in what degree he really said all that he is related to have said. He has left no written record of himself, and we are compelled to judge from the imperfect and obscure information which his biographers (persons certainly of very undisciplined and undiscriminating minds) have transmitted to posterity.^ It cannot be precisely ascertained in what degree Jesus Christ accommodated his doctrines to the opinions of his auditors; or in what degree he really said all that he is related to have said.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Every fanatic or enemy of virtue is not at liberty to misrepresent the greatest geniuses and most heroic defenders of all that is valuable in this mortal world.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He has left no written record of himself, and we are compelled to judge from the imperfect and obscure information which his biographers (persons certainly of very undisciplined and undiscriminating minds) have transmitted to posterity.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .These writers (our only guides) impute sentiments to Jesus Christ which flatly contradict each other.^ These writers (our only guides) impute sentiments to Jesus Christ which flatly contradict each other.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Not only Jesus Christ, but the most eminent professors of every sect of philosophy, have reasoned against this futile superstition.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Jesus Christ did what every other reformer who has produced any considerable effect upon the world has done.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .They represent him as narrow, superstitious, and exquisitely vindictive and malicious.^ They represent him as narrow, superstitious, and exquisitely vindictive and malicious.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .They insert, in the midst of a strain of impassioned eloquence or sagest exhortation, a sentiment only remarkable for its naked and drivelling folly.^ They insert, in the midst of a strain of impassioned eloquence or sagest exhortation, a sentiment only remarkable for its naked and drivelling folly.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .But it is not difficult to distinguish the inventions by which these historians have filled up the interstices of tradition, or corrupted the simplicity of truth, from the real character of their rude amazement.^ But it is not difficult to distinguish the inventions by which these historians have filled up the interstices of tradition, or corrupted the simplicity of truth, from the real character of their rude amazement.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .They have left sufficiently clear indications of the genuine character of Jesus Christ to rescue it for ever from the imputations cast upon it by their ignorance and fanaticism.
    We discover that he is the enemy of oppression and of falsehood; that he is the advocate of equal justice; that he is neither disposed to sanction bloodshed nor deceit, under whatsoever pretences their practice may be vindicated.^ They have left sufficiently clear indications of the genuine character of Jesus Christ to rescue it for ever from the imputations cast upon it by their ignorance and fanaticism.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ We discover that he is the enemy of oppression and of falsehood; that he is the advocate of equal justice; that he is neither disposed to sanction bloodshed nor deceit, under whatsoever pretences their practice may be vindicated.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Jesus Christ expressly asserts that distinction between the good and evil principle which it has been the practice of all theologians to confound.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .We discover that he was a man of meek and majestic demeanour, calm in danger; of natural and simple thought and habits; beloved to adoration by his adherents; unmoved, solemn, and severe.
  • Every fanatic or enemy of virtue is not at liberty to misrepresent the greatest geniuses and most heroic defenders of all that is valuable in this mortal world.^ We discover that he was a man of meek and majestic demeanour, calm in danger; of natural and simple thought and habits; beloved to adoration by his adherents; unmoved, solemn, and severe.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Every fanatic or enemy of virtue is not at liberty to misrepresent the greatest geniuses and most heroic defenders of all that is valuable in this mortal world.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The great of all ages are arraigned, and the spirit of the world is brought before us, while its heroes pass, unveil their faces for a moment, and are swallowed in the throng that has no ending.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    .History, to gain any credit, must contain some truth, and that truth shall thus be made a sufficient indication of prejudice and deceit.

    With respect to the miracles which these biographers have related, I have already declined to enter into any discussion on their nature or their existence.^ History, to gain any credit, must contain some truth, and that truth shall thus be made a sufficient indication of prejudice and deceit.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ With respect to the miracles which these biographers have related, I have already declined to enter into any discussion on their nature or their existence.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He had already abjured animal food and alcohol; and his favourite diet consisted of pulse or bread, which he ate dry with water, or made into panada.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    .The supposition of their falsehood or their truth would modify in no degree the hues of the picture which is attempted to be delineated.
  • Jesus Christ did what every other reformer who has produced any considerable effect upon the world has done.^ Jesus Christ did what every other reformer who has produced any considerable effect upon the world has done.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The supposition of their falsehood or their truth would modify in no degree the hues of the picture which is attempted to be delineated.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The practice of utter sincerity towards other men would avail to no good end, if they were incapable of practising it towards their own minds.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .He accommodated his doctrines to the prepossessions of those whom he addressed.^ He accommodated his doctrines to the prepossessions of those whom he addressed.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .He used a language for this view sufficiently familiar to our comprehensions.^ He used a language for this view sufficiently familiar to our comprehensions.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .He said, — However new or strange my doctrines may appear to you, they are in fact only the restoration and re-establishment of those original institutions and ancient customs of your own law and religion.^ He said, — However new or strange my doctrines may appear to you, they are in fact only the restoration and re-establishment of those original institutions and ancient customs of your own law and religion.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ We encourage you to keep this file, exactly as it is, on your own disk, thereby keeping an electronic path open for future readers.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Deep down in his own heart he had, however, less doubt: "This I know," he said to Medwin, "that whether in prosing or in versing, there is something in my writings that shall live for ever."
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    .The constitutions of your faith and policy, although perfect in their origin, have become corrupt and altered, and have fallen into decay.^ The constitutions of your faith and policy, although perfect in their origin, have become corrupt and altered, and have fallen into decay.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    I profess to restore them to their pristine authority and splendour
.
You ought to love all mankind; nay, every individual of mankind.
  • The practice of utter sincerity towards other men would avail to no good end, if they were incapable of practising it towards their own minds.^ The practice of utter sincerity towards other men would avail to no good end, if they were incapable of practising it towards their own minds.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I profess to restore them to their pristine authority and splendour You ought to love all mankind; nay, every individual of mankind.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ When they love but live no more.
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    .In fact, truth cannot be communicated until it is perceived.
    The interests, therefore, of truth require that an orator should, as far as possible, produce in his hearers that state of mind on which alone his exhortations could fairly be contemplated and examined.
  • Too mean-spirited and too feeble in resolve to attempt the conquest of their own evil passions, and of the difficulties of the material world, men sought dominion over their fellow-men, as an easy method to gain that apparent majesty and power which the instinct of their nature requires.
  • In proportion to the love existing among men, so will be the community of property and power. Among true and real friends, all is common; and, were ignorance and envy and superstition banished from the world, all mankind would be friends.^ Nature had rased their love—which could not be .
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I walk into the air (but no relief To seek,--or haply, if I sought, to find; It came unsought);--to wonder that a chief _5 Among men's spirits should be cold and blind.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The purpose of this address was to rouse the Irish people to a sense of their real misery, to point out that Catholic Emancipation and a Repeal of the Union Act were the only radical remedies for their wrongs, and to teach them the spirit in which they should attempt a revolution.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 1/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    .The only perfect and genuine republic is that which comprehends every living being.^ The only perfect and genuine republic is that which comprehends every living being.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Those distinctions which have been artificially set up, of nations, societies, families, and religions, are only general names, expressing the abhorrence and contempt with which men blindly consider their fellowmen.
  • You ought to love all mankind; nay, every individual of mankind.^ All those who love—and who e’er loved like thee, .
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Anything short of unlimited toleration and complete charity with all men, on which you will recollect that Jesus Christ principally insisted, is wrong."
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 1/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is urged that they ought to have proceeded by the legal method of calling witnesses; and that the sentence was not only out of all proportion to the offence, but that it ought not to have been executed till persuasion had been tried.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 1/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    You ought not to love the individuals of your domestic circles less, but to love those who exist beyond it more.
    Once make the feelings of confidence and of affection universal, and the distinctions of property and power will vanish; nor are they to be abolished without substituting something equivalent in mischief to them, until all mankind shall acknowledge an entire community of rights.
.
Every man, in proportion to his virtue, considers himself, with respect to the great community of mankind, as the steward and guardian of their interests in the property which he chances to possess.
  • Fame, power, and gold, are loved for their own sakes — are worshipped with a blind, habitual idolatry. The pageantry of empire, and the fame of irresistible might, are contemplated by the possessor with unmeaning complacency, without a retrospect to the properties which first made him consider them of value.^ Fame, power, and gold, are loved for their own sakes — are worshipped with a blind, habitual idolatry.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The pageantry of empire, and the fame of irresistible might, are contemplated by the possessor with unmeaning complacency, without a retrospect to the properties which first made him consider them of value.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In proportion to the love existing among men, so will be the community of property and power.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .It is from the cultivation of the most contemptible properties of human nature that discord and torpor and indifference, by which the moral universe is disordered, essentially depend.^ But the absorption of the human soul into primeval nature-forces, the blending of the principle of thought with the universal spirit of beauty, is not enough to satisfy man's yearning after immortality.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    .So long as these are the ties by which human society is connected, let it not be admitted that they are fragile.
  • Before man can be free, and equal, and truly wise, he must cast aside the chains of habit and superstition; he must strip sensuality of its pomp, and selfishness of its excuses, and contemplate actions and objects as they really are. He will discover the wisdom of universal love; he will feel the meanness and the injustice of sacrificing the reason and the liberty of his fellow-men to the indulgence of his physical appetites, and becoming a party to their degradation by the consummation of his own.^ Before man can be free, and equal, and truly wise, he must cast aside the chains of habit and superstition; he must strip sensuality of its pomp, and selfishness of its excuses, and contemplate actions and objects as they really are.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ So long as these are the ties by which human society is connected, let it not be admitted that they are fragile.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He will discover the wisdom of universal love; he will feel the meanness and the injustice of sacrificing the reason and the liberty of his fellow-men to the indulgence of his physical appetites, and becoming a party to their degradation by the consummation of his own.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]


    .Such, with those differences only incidental to the age and state of society in which they were promulgated, appear to have been the doctrines of Jesus Christ.^ Such, with those differences only incidental to the age and state of society in which they were promulgated, appear to have been the doctrines of Jesus Christ.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ They have left sufficiently clear indications of the genuine character of Jesus Christ to rescue it for ever from the imputations cast upon it by their ignorance and fanaticism.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It cannot be precisely ascertained in what degree Jesus Christ accommodated his doctrines to the opinions of his auditors; or in what degree he really said all that he is related to have said.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .It is not too much to assert that they have been the doctrines of every just and compassionate mind that ever speculated on the social nature of man.
  • Nothing is more obviously false than that the remedy for the inequality among men consists in their return to the condition of savages and beasts.^ It is not too much to assert that they have been the doctrines of every just and compassionate mind that ever speculated on the social nature of man.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Nothing is more obviously false than that the remedy for the inequality among men consists in their return to the condition of savages and beasts.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He will watch from dawn to gloom The lake-reflected sun illume The yellow bees in the ivy-bloom, Nor heed nor see, what things they be; But from these create he can Forms more real than living man, Nurslings of immortality!
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Philosophy will never be understood if we approach the study of its mysteries with so narrow and illiberal conceptions of its universality.
  • When you understand the degree of attention which the requisitions of your physical nature demand, you will perceive how little labour suffices for their satisfaction.^ When you understand the degree of attention which the requisitions of your physical nature demand, you will perceive how little labour suffices for their satisfaction.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Philosophy will never be understood if we approach the study of its mysteries with so narrow and illiberal conceptions of its universality.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley - Wikiquote 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ We have only to read Shelley's "Essay on Christianity", in order to perceive what reverent admiration he felt for Jesus, and how profoundly he understood the true character of his teaching.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Your Heavenly Father knoweth you have need of these things.^ And these, With some exceptions, which I need not tease Your patience by descanting on, are all You and I know in London.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ They talked much of death, and it is noticeable that the last words written to him by Jane were these:--"Are you going to join your friend Plato?"
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The frailty of all things here, Why choose you the frailest For your cradle, your home, and your bier?
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    .The universal Harmony, or Reason, which makes your passive frame of thought its dwelling, in proportion to the purity and majesty of its nature will instruct you, if ye are willing to attain that exalted condition, in what manner to possess all the objects necessary for your material subsistence.^ And again, he writes to Hunt: "I am full of thoughts and plans, and should do something, if the feeble and irritable frame which encloses it was willing to obey the spirit.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And these, With some exceptions, which I need not tease Your patience by descanting on, are all You and I know in London.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Sweet lips, could my heart have hidden That its life was crushed by you, Ye would not have then forbidden The death which a heart so true Sought in your briny dew.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    .All men are to become thus pure and happy.^ Gods and men, we are all deluded thus!
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    All men are called to participate in the community of Nature's gifts. .The man who has fewest bodily wants approaches nearest to the Divine Nature
  • In proportion as mankind becomes wise — yes, in exact proportion to that wisdom — should be the extinction of the unequal system under which they now subsist.^ Byron, who had some right to express a judgment in such a matter, described him as the most companionable man under the age of thirty he had ever met with.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is likely that they were not averse to getting rid of him as a man dangerous to the peace of their society; and now they had a good occasion.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 1/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Plato was another of their favourite authors; but Hogg expressly tells us that they only approached the divine philosopher through the medium of translations.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 1/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    Government is, in fact, the mere badge of their depravity. .They are so little aware of the inestimable benefits of mutual love as to indulge, without thought, and almost without motive, in the worst excesses of selfishness and malice.
    Hence, without graduating human society into a scale of empire and subjection, its very existence has become impossible.^ But the absorption of the human soul into primeval nature-forces, the blending of the principle of thought with the universal spirit of beauty, is not enough to satisfy man's yearning after immortality.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    It is necessary that universal benevolence should supersede the regulations of precedent and prescription, before these regulations can safely be abolished. Meanwhile, their very subsistence depends on the system of injustice and violence, which they have been devised to palliate.
.
It is the characteristic of a cold and tame spirit to imagine that such doctrines as Jesus Christ promulgated are destined to follow the fortunes and share the extinction of a popular religion.
  • The demagogues of the infant republic of the Christian sect, attaining through eloquence or artifice, to influence amongst its members, first violated (under the pretence of watching over their integrity) the institutions established for the common and equal benefit of all.^ "Anything short of unlimited toleration and complete charity with all men, on which you will recollect that Jesus Christ principally insisted, is wrong."
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 1/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A certain interest attaches to it as the first known link between Shelley and William Godwin, for it was composed under the influence of the latter's novel, "St.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 1/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ See also: COMMON common pleas under Henry VIL, thence to a member of See also: PARLIAMENT (Anglo-Lat.
    • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

    .These demagogues artfully silenced the voice of the moral sense among them by engaging them to attend, not so much to the cultivation of a virtuous and happy life in this mortal scene, as to the attainment of a fortunate condition after death; not so much to the consideration of those means by which the state of man is adorned and improved, as an inquiry into the secrets of the connexion between God and the world — things which, they well knew, were not to be explained, or even to be conceived.^ All things that we love and cherish, Like ourselves must fade and perish; Such is our rude mortal lot-- Love itself would, did they not.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But no man was ever more enthusiastically loved--more looked up to, as one superior to his fellows in intellectual endowments and moral worth, by the few who knew him well, and had sufficient nobleness of soul to appreciate his superiority.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I envy death the body far less than the oppressors the minds of those whom they have torn from me.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    .The system of equality which they established necessarily fell to the ground, because it is a system that must result from, rather than precede, the moral improvement of human kind.
  • Every man, in proportion to his virtue, considers himself, with respect to the great community of mankind, as the steward and guardian of their interests in the property which he chances to possess.^ He put himself under the care of a medical man, who promised great things, and made him endure severe bodily pain, without any good results.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ O thou immortal deity Whose throne is in the depth of human thought, I do adjure thy power and thee By all that man may be, by all that he is not, By all that he has been and yet must be!
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I have chosen a passage bearing on his theological opinions:-- "Moral qualities are such as only a human being can possess.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 1/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Every man, in proportion to his wisdom, sees the manner in which it is his duty to employ the resources which the consent of mankind has intrusted to his discretion.
  • Some benefit has not failed to flow from the imperfect attempts which have been made to erect a system of equal rights to property and power upon the basis of arbitrary institutions.^ There was another very much larger property which Percy might shortly before have secured to himself, contingently upon his father's See also: DEATH death , if he would have consented to put it upon the same footing of See also: ENTAIL (from Fr.
    • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

    ^ If, therefore, be had acted upon his personal conviction of the right, he would never have wedded Harriet, whether by, Scotch, English or any other See also: LAW LAW (0.
    • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

    ^ The preface to "Laon and Cythna" shows what a powerful impression had been made upon him by the glaciers, and how he delighted in the element of peril.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    They have undoubtedly, in every case, from the instability of their foundation, failed. .Still, they constitute a record of those epochs at which a trite sense of justice suggested itself to the understandings of men, so that they consented to forego all the cherished delights of luxury, all the habitual gratifications arising out of the possession or the expectation of power, all the superstitions with which the accumulated authority of ages had made them dear and venerable.^ They have taken thy brother and sister dear, They have made them unfit for thee; _10 They have withered the smile and dried the tear Which should have been sacred to me.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ When Shelley visited Lord Byron at Ravenna, the latter had suggested his coming out, together with the plan of a periodical work in which they should all join.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And many rose Whose woe was such that fear became desire;-- _35 Melchior and Lionel were not among those; They from the throng of men had stepped aside, And made their home under the green hill-side.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    .They are so many trophies erected in the enemy's land, to mark the limits of the victorious progress of truth and justice.
  • No mistake is more to be deplored than the conception that a system of morals and religion should derive any portion of its authority either from the circumstance of its novelty or its antiquity, that it should be judged excellent, not because it is reasonable or true, but because no person has ever thought of it before, or because it has been thought of from the beginning of time.
  • An established religion turns to deathlike apathy the sublimest ebullitions of most exalted genius, and the spirit-stirring truths of a mind inflamed with the desire of benefiting mankind.^ When they love but live no more.
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ His life was now spent more in thought than action--he had lost the eager spirit which believed it could achieve what it projected for the benefit of mankind.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And again, he writes to Hunt: "I am full of thoughts and plans, and should do something, if the feeble and irritable frame which encloses it was willing to obey the spirit.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    It is the characteristic of a cold and tame spirit to imagine that such doctrines as Jesus Christ promulgated are destined to follow the fortunes and share the extinction of a popular religion.

Unsourced

.
  • Nothing wilts faster than laurels that have been rested upon.
  • When my cats aren't happy, I'm not happy.^ On my observing this to him, he answered, 'When my brain gets heated with thought, it soon boils, and throws off images and words faster than I can skim them off.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Not because I care about their mood but because I know they're just sitting there thinking up ways to get even.^ International donations are accepted, but we don't know ANYTHING about how to make them tax-deductible, or even if they CAN be made deductible, and don't have the staff to handle it even if there are ways.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ To hearts which near each other move From evening close to morning light, _10 The night is good; because, my love, They never SAY good-night.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And they learn little there, except to know .
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    • Also, and more plausibly, attributed to Penny Ward Moser

Misattributed

  • Change is certain. Peace is followed by disturbances; departure of evil men by their return. Such recurrences should not constitute occasions for sadness but realities for awareness, so that one may be happy in the interim.
    • Not Shelley but the I Ching

Quotes about Shelley

.
  • I regard Shelley's early 'atheism' and later Pantheism, as simply the negative and the affirmative side of the same progressive but harmonious life-creed.^ The same principles guided Shelley at a still later period.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 1/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Later on in life, Shelley outgrew this preoccupation with his idealized self, and directed his genius to more objective themes.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ There was something incalculable, incommensurable, and daemonic in Shelley's genius; and what he might have achieved, had his life been spared and had his health progressively improved, it is of course impossible to say.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    .In his earlier years his disposition was towards a vehement denial of a theology which he never ceased to detest; in his maturer years he made more frequent reference to the great World Spirit in whom he had from the first believed.^ His life was now spent more in thought than action--he had lost the eager spirit which believed it could achieve what it projected for the benefit of mankind.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The great of all ages are arraigned, and the spirit of the world is brought before us, while its heroes pass, unveil their faces for a moment, and are swallowed in the throng that has no ending.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ This is strongly stated; but, though the terms are certainly exaggerated, I believe that we must trust this first impression made on Shelley's friend.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 1/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    .He grew wiser in the exercise of his religious faith, but the faith was the same throughout; there, was progression, but no essential change.^ For love, and beauty, and delight, There is no death nor change: their might _135 Exceeds our organs, which endure No light, being themselves obscure.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ For love, and beauty, and delight, There is no death nor change; their might Exceeds our organs, which endure No light, being themselves obscure.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
  • Shelley resembled Blake in the contrast of feeling with which he regarded the Christian religion and its founder.^ The epitaph, composed by Hunt, ran thus: "Percy Bysshe Shelley, Cor Cordium, Natus iv.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Percy Bysshe Shelley as a Philosopher and Reformer (English) (as Author) Souli, Charles Georges, 1878-1955 .
    • Browse By Author: S - Project Gutenberg 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 .
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    .For the human character of Christ he could feel the deepest veneration, as may be seen not only from the "Essay on Christianity," but from the "Letter to Lord Ellenborough" (1812), and also from the notes to "Hellas" and passages in that poem and in "Prometheus Unbound"; but he held that the spirit of established Christianity was wholly out of harmony with that of Christ, and that a similarity to Christ was one of the qualities most detested by the modern Christian.^ It was on a beautiful summer evening, while wandering among the lanes whose myrtle-hedges were the bowers of the fire-flies, that we heard the carolling of the skylark which inspired one of the most beautiful of his poems.
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ We have only to read Shelley's "Essay on Christianity", in order to perceive what reverent admiration he felt for Jesus, and how profoundly he understood the true character of his teaching.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I loved--oh, no, I mean not one of ye, Or any earthly one, though ye are dear As human heart to human heart may be;-- I loved, I know not what--but this low sphere _20 And all that it contains, contains not thee, Thou, whom, seen nowhere, I feel everywhere.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    .The dogmas of the Christian faith were always repudiated by him, and there is no warrant whatever in his writings for the strange pretension that, had he lived longer, his objections to Christianity might in some way have been overcome.^ There is no death nor change: their might .
    • The Complete Poetical Works, by Percy Bysshe Shelley (volume25) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Byron admired very highly the generous, unworldly and enthusiastic character of Shelley, and set some value on his writings; Shelley half-worshipped Byron as a poet, and was anxious, but in some conjunctures by no means able, to respect him as a man .
    • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Had he lived to a ripe age, there is no saying with what clear and beneficent lustre might have shone that light of aspiration which during his turbid youth burned somewhat luridly, and veiled its radiance in the smoke of mere rebelliousness and contradiction.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 1/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
  • The real difference between Byron and Shelley is this: those who understand and love them rejoice that Byron died at thirty-six, because if he had lived he would have become a reactionary bourgeois; they grieve that Shelley died at twenty-nine, because he was essentially a revolutionist and he would always have been one of the advanced guard of socialism.^ Byron died when he was thirty-six, Keats when he was twenty-five, and Shelley when he was on the point of completing his thirtieth year.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 1/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Salt, Henry Stephens, 1851-1939.

    ^ Shelley in his lifetime bound those who knew him with a chain of loyal affection, impressing observers so essentially different as Hogg, Byron, Peacock, Leigh Hunt, Trelawny, Medwin, Williams, with the conviction that he was the gentlest, purest, bravest, and most spiritual being they had ever met.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
  • At last, at the age of 17 I came across Shelley, whom no one had ever told me about.^ It will be seen that, whatever Shelley may from time to time have said about the immortality of the soul, he was no materialist, and no believer in the extinction of the spiritual element by death.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He immediately communicated with Shelley, and the whole edition was suppressed--not, however, before about one hundred copies had passed into circulation.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 1/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Instead of remaining true to the conception of Beauty expressed in the "Hymn," Shelley "sought through the world the One whom he may love."
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    .He remained for many years the man I loved most among the great men of the past.^ During his four last years this most loveable of men was becoming gradually riper, wiser, truer to his highest instincts.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ When a mother clasps her child, Watch till dusty Death has piled His cold ashes on the clay; She has loved it many a day-- She remains,--it fades away.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ That labour of exquisite art and of devoted love still remains to be accomplished, though in the meantime Mr. W.M. Rossetti's Memoir is a most valuable instalment.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
  • Shelley, whose talents would otherwise have made him eligible, was an outcast from the first ...^ Familiarity with the great works of antique and Italian art would doubtless have altered some of the opinions he at first expressed; just as longer residence among the people made him modify his views about their character.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Godwin, though overrated in his generation, and almost ludicrously idealized by Shelley, was a man whose talents verged on genius.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ This is strongly stated; but, though the terms are certainly exaggerated, I believe that we must trust this first impression made on Shelley's friend.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 1/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    They always knew where to draw the line and they drew it, emphatically, at Shelley. .I was informed that Byron could be forgiven because, though he had sinned, he had been led into sin by the unfortunate circumstances of his youth, and had always been haunted by remorse, but that for Shelley's moral character there was nothing to be said since he acted on principle and therefore he could not be worth reading.^ Byron described him as "bold as a lion;" and indeed it may here be said, once and for all, that Shelley's physical courage was only equalled by his moral fearlessness.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It was next said that he nev­er could be­come pop­ular, and there­fore the mis­chief he could do was lim­it­ed.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley as a Philosopher and Reformer by Sotheran, Charles - Pages 1-70 | Lexcycle 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.lexcycle.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ There is no proof that Shelley, though eloquent in conversation, was a powerful public speaker.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 1/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
  • The more I see the more I doubt whether people ever really make aesthetic judgements at all.^ To Ollier, in 1820, he wrote: "I doubt whether I shall write more.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ All that she could do, would be to quicken the soul's sense of beauty, to stir it from its lethargy, and to make it divine the eternal reality of beauty in the supersensual world of thought.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ We meet not as we parted, We feel more than all may see; My bosom is heavy-hearted, And thine full of doubt for me:-- One moment has bound the free.
    • — Volume 2 / Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

    Everything is judged on political grounds which are then given an aesthetic disguise. .When, for instance, Eliot can't see anything good in Shelley or anything bad in Kipling, the real underlying reason must be that one is a radical and the other a conservative, of sorts.^ Shelley was a shy, sensitive, mopish sort of boy from one point of view—from another a very unruly one, having his own notions of See also: JUSTICE (Lat.
    • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

    ^ The two See also: WORKS works differ very considerably, and neither of them resembles Miss Curran's portrait, yet we incline to believe that the sketch was really taken from Shelley .
    • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Shelley had already done a good deal of boating with Williams on the Arno and the Serchio, and had on one occasion nearly lost his life by the capsizing of their tiny craft.
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

External links

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1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

.PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (1792-1822), English poet, was born on the 4th of August 1792 at Field Place, near Horsham, Sussex.^ It's the birthday of the English Romantic poet Percy Bysshe Shelley , ( books by this author ) born in Sussex, England (1792).
  • The Writer's Almanac with Garrison Keillor | Ozymandias by Percy Bysshe Shelley 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC writersalmanac.publicradio.org [Source type: General]

^ Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822) .
  • Ozymandias 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC wps.prenhall.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Percy Bysshe Shelley - a biography.

.He was the eldest child of Timothy Shelley (1753-1844) M.P. for Shoreham, by his wife Elizabeth, daughter of Charles Pilfold, of Effingham, Surrey.^ He was the oldest son of Timothy and Elizabeth Shelley.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley Essay 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.exampleessays.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ His mother was daughter of Charles Pilfold of Effingham.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The eldest son of Timothy and Elizabeth Shelley, ...
  • Poet: Percy Bysshe Shelley - All poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley 18 September 2009 10:49 UTC www.poemhunter.com [Source type: General]

.His father was the son and heir of Sir Bysshe Shelley, Bart.^ His father was the son and heir of Sir Bysshe Shelley, Bart.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - LoveToKnow 1911 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Shelley, Percy Florence, Sir, bart.

^ See also: SIR Sir Bysshe Shelley, See also: BART, JEAN (1651-1702) Bart .
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

(d. .1815), whose baronetcy (1806) was a reward from the Whig party for political services.^ Whig party for political services.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - LoveToKnow 1911 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]

^ See also: REWARD reward from the Whig party for See also: POLITICAL political services .
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

^ Whose is the warm and partial praise, Virtue’s most sweet reward?
  • Queen Mab by Percy Bysshe Shelley 1813 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.marxists.org [Source type: Original source]

Sir Bysshe's father Timothy had emigrated to America, and he himself had been born in Newark, New Jersey; but he came back to England, and did well for himself by marrying successively two heiresses, the first, the mother of Timothy, being Mary Catherine, daughter of the Rev. Theobald Michell of Horsham. .He was a handsome man of enterprising and remarkable character, accumulated a vast fortune, built Castle Goring, and lived in sullen and penurious retirement in his closing years.^ He was a handsome man of enterprising and remarkable character, accumulated a vast fortune, built Castle Goring, and lived in sullen and penurious retirement in his closing years.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - LoveToKnow 1911 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), English poet 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Mona) man of enterprising and remarkable See also: CHARACTER (Gr.
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

^ Castle See also: GORING, GEORGE GORING, LORD (1608-1657) Goring , and lived in sullen and penurious retirement in his closing years .
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

.None of his talent seems to have descended to his son Timothy, who, except for being of a rather oddly selfassertive character, was undistinguishable from the ordinary run of commonplace country squires.^ None of his talent seems to have descended to Timothy, who, except for being of rather oddly self-assertive character, was undistinguishable from the ordinary run of commonplace country squires.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), English poet 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ None of his talent seems to have descended to his son Timothy, who, except for being of a rather oddly selfassertive character, was undistinguishable from the ordinary run of commonplace country squires.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - LoveToKnow 1911 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]

^ His father, Sir Timothy (at one time the Member of Parliament for Horsham), seems to have had little understanding of his original and highly imaginative son.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley 1792-1822 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.burrows.co.uk [Source type: General]

.The mother of the poet is described as beautiful, and a woman of good abilities, but not with any literary turn; she was an agreeable letter-writer.^ The mother of the poet is described as beautiful, "and a woman of See also: GOOD, JOHN MASON (1764-1827) good abilities, but not with any See also: LITERARY literary turn; she was an agreeable See also: LETTER (through Fr.
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

^ The mother of the poet is described as beautiful, and a woman of good abilities, but not with any literary turn; she was an agreeable letter-writer.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - LoveToKnow 1911 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), English poet 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ August 1792 - 8 July 1822 The poet who was married to the woman who wrote Frankenstein - and, yes, an important literary figure in his own right.
  • The Literary Gothic | Percy Bysshe Shelley 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.litgothic.com [Source type: Academic]

.The branch of the Shelley family to which the poet Percy Bysshe belonged traces its pedigree to Henry Shelley, of Worminghurst, Sussex, who died in 1623. These Worminghurst or Castle Goring Shelleys are of the same stock as the Michelgrove Shelleys, who trace up to Sir William Shelley, judge of the common pleas under Henry VII., thence to a member of parliament in 1415, and to the reign of Edward I., or even to the epoch of the Norman Conquest.^ Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822) .
  • Ozymandias 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC wps.prenhall.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • 5853. Percy Bysshe Shelley. 1792-1822. John Bartlett, comp. 1919. Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www2.bartleby.com [Source type: Original source]
  • 5852. Percy Bysshe Shelley. 1792-1822. John Bartlett, comp. 1919. Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www2.bartleby.com [Source type: Original source]
  • 5869. Percy Bysshe Shelley. 1792-1822. John Bartlett, comp. 1919. Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www1.bartleby.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Percy Bysshe Shelley - a biography.

^ Her husband was, of course, Percy Bysshe Shelley.
  • Review: Mary Shelley by Miranda Seymour 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.zeta.org.au [Source type: Original source]

.The Worminghurst branch was a family of credit, but not of special distinction, until its fortunes culminated under the above-named Sir Bysshe.^ The Worminghurst branch was a family of credit, but not of distinction, until his fortunes culminated under the above-named Sir Bysshe.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), English poet 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The Worminghurst branch was a family of credit, but not of special distinction, until its fortunes culminated under the above-named Sir Bysshe.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - LoveToKnow 1911 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The Worminghurst branch was a family of See also: CREDIT (Lat.
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

.In the character of Percy Bysshe Shelley three qualities became early manifest, and may be regarded as innate: impressionableness or extreme susceptibility to external and internal impulses of feeling; a lively imagination or erratic fancy, blurring a sound estimate of solid facts; and a resolute repudiation of outer authority or the despotism of custom.^ Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822) .
  • Ozymandias 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC wps.prenhall.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Percy Bysshe Shelley - a biography.

^ Her husband was, of course, Percy Bysshe Shelley.
  • Review: Mary Shelley by Miranda Seymour 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.zeta.org.au [Source type: Original source]

.These qualities were highly developed in his earliest manhood, were active in his boyhood, and no doubt made some show even on the borderland between childhood and infancy.^ These qualities were highly developed in his earliest manhood, were active in his boyhood, and no doubt made some show even on the borderland between childhood and infancy .
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - LoveToKnow 1911 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]

^ These qualities were highly developed in his earliest manhood, were active in his boyhood, and no doubt made some show even on the borderland between childhood and infancy.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), English poet 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ However, if your VP creates regularly something impressive – not even necessarily very talented – the observers will have no doubts its existence.
  • Mary and Percy Shelley. A Theory of Virtual Personality 18 September 2009 10:49 UTC www.zhurnal.ru [Source type: General]

At the age of six he was sent to a day school at Warnham, kept by the Rev. Mr Edwards; at ten to Sion House School, Brentford, of which the principal was Dr Greenlaw, while the pupils were mostly sons of local tradesmen; at twelve (or immediately before that age, on the 29th of July 1804) to Eton. .The headmaster of Eton, up to nearly the close of Shelley's sojourn in the school, was Dr Goodall, a mild disciplinarian; it is therefore a mistake to suppose that Percy (unless during his very brief stay in the lower school) was frequently flagellated by the formidable Dr Keate, who only became headmaster after Goodall.^ Percy (unless during his very brief stay in the See also: LOWER lower school) was frequently flagellated by the formidable Dr See also: KEATE, JOHN (1773—1852) Keate , who only became headmaster after Goodall .
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

^ During their stay, little Clara Shelley (b.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley (English poet) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley Biography - Biography.com 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.biography.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ CLOSE, MAXWELL HENRY (1822-1903) close of Shelley's sojourn in the school, was Dr Goodall, a mild disciplinarian; it is therefore a See also: MISTAKE (i.e.
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

.Shelley was a shy, sensitive, mopish sort of boy from one point of view-- from another a very unruly one, having his own notions of justice, independence and mental freedom; by nature gentle, kindly and retiring - under provocation dangerously violent.^ Shelley was a shy, sensitive, mopish sort of boy from one point of view—from another a very unruly one, having his own notions of See also: JUSTICE (Lat.
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

^ At this point the Shelleys marriage was an unhappy one.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley Biography - Poems 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.poemofquotes.com [Source type: General]

^ Shelley was a shy, sensitive, mopish sort of boy from one point of view-- from another a very unruly one, having his own notions of justice, independence and mental freedom; by nature gentle, kindly and retiring - under provocation dangerously violent.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - LoveToKnow 1911 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]

He resisted the odious fagging system, exerted himself little in the routine of school-learning, and was known both as " Mad Shelley " and as " Shelley the Atheist." Some writers try to show that an Eton boy would be termed atheist without exhibiting any propensity to atheism, but solely on the ground of his being mutinous. .However, as Shelley was a declared atheist a good while before attaining his majority, a shrewd suspicion arises that, if Etonians dubbed him atheist, they had some relevant reason for doing so.^ However, as Shelley was a declared atheist a good while before attaining his majority, a shrewd suspicion arises that, if Etonians dubbed him atheist, they had some relevant reason for doing so.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - LoveToKnow 1911 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), English poet 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ However, as Shelley was a declared atheist a good while before attaining his See also: MAJORITY (Fr.
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

^ They called him "mad Shelley."
  • Author Biography 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC eolit.hrw.com [Source type: Original source]

.Shelley entered University College, Oxford, in April 1810, returned thence to Eton, and finally quitted the school at midsummer, and commenced residence in Oxford in October.^ Shelley was educated at the Syon House Academy in Brentford (Middlesex) and Eton College (Buckinghamshire), before entering University College, Oxford in 1810.
  • RBH Biography: Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.berkshirehistory.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Finally, when he was sent to University College, Oxford, he broke all bounds.
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY AND MARY... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC docs.google.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Shelley attended Syon House Academy and Eton and in 1810 he entered the Oxford University College.

.Here he met a young Durham man, Thomas Jefferson Hogg, who had preceded him in the university by a couple of months; the two youths at once struck up a warm and intimate friendship.^ Here he met a young Durham man, Thomas Jefferson Hogg, who had preceded him in the university by the couple of months; the two youths at once struck up a warm and intimate friendship.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), English poet 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Hogg, Thomas Jefferson, 1792-1862.

^ Here he met a young Durham man, Thomas Jefferson Hogg , who had preceded him in the university by a couple of months; the two youths at once struck up a warm and intimate friendship.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - LoveToKnow 1911 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]

.Shelley had at this time a love for chemical experiment, as well as for poetry, philosophy, and classical study, and was in all his tastes and bearing an enthusiast.^ Shelley's philosophy of love, by Arthur Dillon.
  • History of Vegetarianism - Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.ivu.org [Source type: Academic]

^ Shelley was not at all in love with her.
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY AND MARY... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC docs.google.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Pursuit of death; a study of Shelley's poetry.

.Hogg was not in the least an enthusiast, rather a cynic, but he also was a steady and well-read classical student.^ Hogg was not in the least an enthusiast, rather a cynic, but he also was a steady and well-read classical student.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - LoveToKnow 1911 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), English poet 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Settling near Windsor Great Park in 1815, Shelley read the classics with Hogg and another friend, Thomas Love Peacock.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley Biography - Biography.com 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.biography.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Shelley had at this time a love for chemical experiment, as well as for poetry, philosophy, and classical study, and was in all his tastes and bearing an enthusiast.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), English poet 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

.In religious matters both were sceptics, or indeed decided anti-Christians; whether Hogg, as the senior and more informed disputant, pioneered Shelley into strict atheism, or whether Shelley, as the more impassioned and unflinching speculator, outran the easy-going jeering Hogg, is a moot point; we incline to the latter opinion.^ In religious matters both were sceptics, or indeed decided anti-Christians; whether Hogg, as the senior and more informed disputant, pioneered Shelley into strict atheism, or whether Shelley, as the more impassioned and unflinching speculator, outran the easy-going jeering Hogg, is a moot point; we incline to the latter opinion.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - LoveToKnow 1911 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]

^ In religious matters both were skeptics, or indeed decide anti-Christians; whether Hogg, as the senior and more informed disputant, pioneered Shelley into strict atheism, or whether Shelley, as the more impassioned and unflinching speculator, outran the easy-going jeering Hogg, is a moot point; we incline to the later opinion.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), English poet 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Born into a wealthy family in Sussex, England, Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822) was expelled from Oxford for writing The Necessity of Atheism .
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley : The Poetry Foundation : Find Poems and Poets. Discover Poetry. 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.poetryfoundation.org [Source type: General]

.Certain it is that each egged on the other by perpetual disquisition on abstruse subjects, conducted partly for the sake of truth and partly for that of mental exercitation, without on either side any disposition to bow to authority or stop short of extreme conclusions.^ Certain it is that each egged on the other by perpetual disquisition on abstruse subjects, conduced partly for the sake of truth and partly for that of mental exercitation, without on either side any disposition to bow to authority or stop short of extreme conclusions.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), English poet 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Eski Adalia) side any disposition to See also: BOW (pronounced " bo ") bow to authority or stop See also: SHORT, FRANCIS JOB (1857– ) short of extreme conclusions .
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

^ Certain it is that each egged on the other by perpetual disquisition on abstruse subjects, conducted partly for the sake of truth and partly for that of mental exercitation, without on either side any disposition to bow to authority or stop short of extreme conclusions.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - LoveToKnow 1911 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]

.The upshot of this habit was that Shelley and Hogg, at the close of some five months of happy and uneventful academic life, got expelled from the university.^ The upshot of this habit was that Shelley and Hogg, at the close of some five months of happy and uneventful academic life, got expelled from the university.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - LoveToKnow 1911 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), English poet 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ English senses the French use habitude, not habit) habit was that Shelley and Hogg, at the close of some five months of happy and uneventful See also: ACADEMIC academic See also: LIFE life , got expelled from the university .
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

^ Which university expelled Percy Bysshe Shelley?
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley Quiz - Literature Quizzes - Vincent Augustine D'Souza | Go 4 Quiz 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.go4quiz.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Shelley - for he alone figures as the writer of the " little syllabus," although there can be no doubt that Hogg was his confidant and coadjutor throughout - published anonymously a pamphlet.^ Shelley - for he alone figures as the writer of the " little syllabus ," although there can be no doubt that Hogg was his confidant and coadjutor throughout - published anonymously a pamphlet.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - LoveToKnow 1911 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]

^ There was no difficulty for Shelley in getting this work published.
  • Justin Maradiegue on Ozymandias 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.clayfox.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Of his sincerity there is, I think, no doubt.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley by John Addington Symonds - Full Text Free Book (Part 1/3) 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley / Symonds, John Addington, 1840-1893 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC infomotions.com [Source type: Original source]

or fly .sheet entitled The Necessity of Atheism, which he sent round to bishops and all sorts of people as an invitation or challenge to discussion.^ The Necessity of Atheism, which he sent round to bishops and all sorts of people as an invitation or challenge to discussion.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - LoveToKnow 1911 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]

^ A year later, when he and his best friend, Thomas Hogg, circulated a pamphlet entitled "The Necessity of Atheism," the college disciplinary board promptly expelled them.
  • Trivia on Biography of English Poet Percy Bysshe Shelley Part 1 | Trivia Library 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.trivia-library.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Percy as well as his friend Jefferson Hogg were expelled for refusing to acknowledge or deny the authorship of a pamphlet entitled The Necessity of Atheism .

.It amounted to saying that neither reason nor testimony is adequate to establish the existence of a deity, and that nothing short of a personal individual self-revelation of the deity would be sufficient.^ It amounted to saying that neither reason nor testimony is adequate to establish the existence of a deity, and that nothing short of a personal individual self-revelation of the deity would be sufficient.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - LoveToKnow 1911 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), English poet 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ It amounted to saying that neither reason nor testimony is adequate to establish the existence of a deity, and that nothing short of a See also: PERSONAL personal individual self- See also: REVELATION, BOOK OF revelation of the deity would be sufficient .
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

^ It may not have much to say on Shelley, but had it only been available, this is the book I would have recommended to Shelley - and especially to his drowning companion and self-appointed skipper, Edward Ellerker Williams.
  • Julian Roach's top 10 books on Percy Bysshe Shelley | Books | guardian.co.uk 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.guardian.co.uk [Source type: General]

.The college authorities heard of the pamphlet, identified Shelley as its author, and summoned him before them - " our master, and two or three of the fellows."^ The college authorities heard of the pamphlet, identified Shelley as its author, and summoned him before them—" our See also: MASTER (Lat.
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

^ The college authorities heard of the pamphlet, identified Shelley as its author, and summoned him before them - " our master, and two or three of the fellows."
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - LoveToKnow 1911 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The college authorities heard to the pamphlet, somehow identified Shelley as its author, and summoned him before them -- "our master, and two or three of the fellows."
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), English poet 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

.The pamphlet was produced, and Shelley was required to say whether he had written it or not.^ The pamphlet was produced, and Shelley was required to say whether he had written it or not.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - LoveToKnow 1911 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), English poet 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Shelley had a hard life, fought against the conservative opinions of his country's society, and produced some of the best poetry ever written.
  • Percy Shelley's biography - The Dark Chamber 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.angelfire.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Shelley refused to deny that he had written the pamphlet when called before the authorities, and he was expelled after only six months at Oxford.
  • Author Biography 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC eolit.hrw.com [Source type: Original source]

.The youth declined to answer the question, and was expelled by a written sentence, ready drawn up.^ The youth declined to answer the question, and was expelled by a written sentence, ready drawn up.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - LoveToKnow 1911 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), English poet 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Percy expelled from Oxford for refusing to answer questions about the pamphlet The Necessity of Atheism .

^ Thus they were dismissed as being mutineers against academic authority, in a case pregnant with the suspicion -- not the proof -- of atheism; but how the authorities could know beforehand that the two undergraduates would be contumacious and stiff against disavowal, so as to give warrant for written sentences ready drawn up, is nowhere explained.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), English poet 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

.Hogg was next summoned, with a result practically the same.^ Hogg was next summoned, with a result practically the same .
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

^ Hogg was next summoned, with a result practically the same.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - LoveToKnow 1911 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), English poet 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

.The precise details of this transaction have been much controverted; the best evidence is that which appears on the college records, showing that both Hogg and Shelley (Hogg is there named first) were expelled for " contumaciously refusing to answer questions," and for " repeatedly declining to disavow " the authorship.^ "In the name of justice, what answer is there to these questions?
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.punkerslut.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Shelley and his friend Hogg were both subsequently expelled from Oxford.
  • Neurotic Poets - Percy Bysshe Shelley 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.neuroticpoets.com [Source type: Original source]

^ But in March 1811, University College expelled both Shelley and Hogg for refusing to admit Shelley's authorship of The Necessity of Atheism .
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley Biography - Biography.com 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.biography.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Thus they were dismissed as being mutineers against academic authority, in a case pregnant with the suspicion - not the proof of atheism; but how the authorities could know beforehand that the two undergraduates would be contumacious and stiff against disavowal, so as to give warrant for written sentences ready drawn up, is nowhere explained.^ Thus they were dismissed as being mutineers against academic authority, in a case pregnant with the suspicion -- not the proof -- of atheism; but how the authorities could know beforehand that the two undergraduates would be contumacious and stiff against disavowal, so as to give warrant for written sentences ready drawn up, is nowhere explained.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), English poet 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Thus they were dismissed as being mutineers against academic authority, in a case pregnant with the suspicion - not the proof of atheism; but how the authorities could know beforehand that the two undergraduates would be contumacious and stiff against disavowal, so as to give warrant for written sentences ready drawn up, is nowhere explained.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - LoveToKnow 1911 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The youth declined to answer the question, and was expelled by a written sentence, ready drawn up.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - LoveToKnow 1911 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), English poet 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

.Possibly the sentences were worded without ground assigned, and would only have been produced in terrorem had the young men proved more malleable.^ Possibly the sentences were worded without ground assigned, and would only have been produced in terrorem had the young men proved more malleable.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - LoveToKnow 1911 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), English poet 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Much of this work was inspired by news of political events, which also produced ‘Young Parson Richards’, ‘Song to the Men of England’, and ‘Sonnet: England 1819’.
  • Shelley, Percy Bysshe – FREE Shelley, Percy Bysshe information | Encyclopedia.com: Find Shelley, Percy Bysshe research 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.encyclopedia.com [Source type: Academic]

^ Some writers try to show that on Eton boy would be termed atheist without exhibiting any propensity to atheism, but solely on the ground of his being mutinous.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), English poet 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

.The date of this incident was the 25th of March 181i.^ The date of this incident was the 25th of March 181i.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - LoveToKnow 1911 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The date of this incident was 25th March 1811.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), English poet 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The date of this incident was the 25th of See also: MARCH MARCH (1) (from Fr.
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

.Shelley and Hogg came up to London, where Shelley was soon left alone, as his friend went to York to study conveyancing.^ He went to London with his friend Hogg, and took lodgings there.
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY AND MARY... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC docs.google.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Shelley and Hogg came up to See also: LONDON London , where Shelley was soon See also: LEFT left alone, as his friend went to See also: YORK YORK (HOUSE OF) YORK, EDMUND OF LANGLEY, DUKE OF (1341-1402) YORK, EDWARD YORK, FREDERICK AUGUSTUS, DUKE OF (1763-1827) YORK, RICHARD, DUKE York to study See also: CONVEYANCING conveyancing .
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

^ Shelley and Hogg came up to London , where Shelley was soon left alone, as his friend went to York to study conveyancing .
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - LoveToKnow 1911 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]

.Percy and his incensed father did not at once come to terms, and for a while he had no resource beyond pocket-money saved up by his sisters (four in number altogether) and sent round to him, sometimes by the hand of a singularly pretty school-fellow, Miss Harriet Westbrook, daughter of a retired and moderately rich hotel-keeper.^ Percy and his incensed father did not at once come to terms, and for a while he had no resource beyond See also: POCKET pocket - See also: MONEY money saved up by his sisters (four in number altogether) and sent round to him, sometimes by the See also: HAND HAND (a word common to Teutonic languages; cf.
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

^ Percy and his incensed father did not at once come to terms, and for a while he had no resource beyond pocket -money saved up by his sisters (four in number altogether) and sent round to him, sometimes by the hand of a singularly pretty school-fellow, Miss Harriet Westbrook , daughter of a retired and moderately rich hotel-keeper.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - LoveToKnow 1911 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]

^ HAND, FERDINAND GOTTHELF (1786-185r) hand of a singularly See also: PRETTY pretty school- See also: FELLOW fellow , See also: MISS Miss Harriet See also: WESTBROOK Westbrook , daughter of a retired and moderately See also: RICH, BARNABE (c.
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

.Shelley, in early youth, had a somewhat " priggish " turn for moralizing and argumentation, and a decided mania for proselytizing; his school-girl sisters, and their little Methodist friend Miss Westbrook, aged between fifteen and sixteen, must all be enlightened and converted to anti Christianity.^ Shelley, in early youth, had a somewhat " priggish " turn for moralizing and argumentation, and a decided See also: MANIA mania for proselytizing; his school-girl sisters, and their little Methodist friend Miss Westbrook, aged between fifteen and sixteen, must all be enlightened and converted to anti- See also: CHRISTIANITY Christianity .
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

^ Shelley, in early youth, had a somewhat " priggish " turn for moralizing and argumentation, and a decided mania for proselytizing; his school-girl sisters, and their little Methodist friend Miss Westbrook, aged between fifteen and sixteen, must all be enlightened and converted to anti Christianity .
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - LoveToKnow 1911 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Shelley, especially in early youth, had a somewhat "priggish" turn for moralizing and argumentation, and a decided mania for proselytizing; his school-girl sisters, and their little Methodist friend Miss Westbrook, aged between fifteen and sixteen, must all be enlightened and converted to anti-Christianity.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), English poet 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

.He therefore cultivated the society of Harriet,.^ He therefore cultivated the society of Harriet,.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley - LoveToKnow 1911 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]

^ He therefore the society of Harriet, calling at the house of her father, and being encouraged in his assiduity by her much older sister Eliza.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), English poet 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

calling at the house of her father, and being encouraged in his assiduity by her much older sister Eliza. .Harriet not unnaturally fell in love with him; and he, though not it would seem at any time ardently in love with her, dallied along the flowery pathway which leads to sentiment and a definite courtship.^ Harriet not unnaturally See also: FELL FELL, JOHN (1625-1686) fell in love with him; and he, though not it would seem at any time ardently in love with her, dallied along the flowery pathway which leads to sentiment and a definite courtship .
  • PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... - Online Information article about PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (... 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

^ Harriet not unnaturally fell in love with him; and he, though not it would seem at any time ardently in love with her, dallied along the flowery pathway which leads to sentiment and a definite courtship.
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), English poet 11 January 2010 3:14 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In 1814 she fell in love with the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley , accompanied him abroad, and after the death of...