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Persian lime
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Rosids
Order: Sapindales
Family: Rutaceae
Genus: Citrus
Species: C. latifolia
Binomial name
Citrus latifolia
(Yu. Tanaka) Tanaka

Persian Lime (Citrus x latifolia), also known as Tahiti lime or Bearss lime (named after John T. Bearss, who developed this seedless variety around 1895 in his nursery at Porterville, California), is a citrus fruit sold simply as a "lime" in the United States. The fruit is about 6 cm in diameter, often with slightly nippled ends, and is usually sold quite green, although it yellows as it reaches full ripeness. It is larger, thicker-skinned, and less aromatic than the key lime (Citrus aurantifolia), which has a wider agricultural distribution worldwide. The advantages of the Persian lime in commercial agriculture compared to the Key lime are the larger size, absence of seeds, hardiness, absence of thorns on the bushes, and longer fruit shelf life. They are less acidic than key limes and don't have the bitterness that lends to the key lime's unique flavor. Persian limes are commercialized primarily in six sizes, known as 110's, 150's, 175's, 200's, 230's and 250's. Once grown primarily in Florida in the U.S.it rose to prominence after Key lime orchards were wiped out there by a hurricane in 1926, though Persian lime orchards themselves were devastated by Hurricane Andrew in 1992. Large numbers of Persian limes are grown, processed, and exported every year primarily from Mexico[1] to the American, European and Asian markets. U.S. Persian lime imports from Mexico are handled mostly through McAllen, Texas[2].[citation needed]

Tree characteristics

Seed type: Angiosperm

Leaf shape: Ovate shaped with whole margins

Leaf position: Alternate

Type of fruit: Hesperidium

External links

Notes

  1. ^ Fruit and Tree Nuts Outlook /FTS-333/ July 30, 2008, page 16, by Agnes Perez and Susan Pollack, Economic Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture. http://www.ers.usda.gov/Publications/FTS/2008/07JUL/FTS333.pdf
  2. ^ Mexican lemons, limes attract U.S. importers, 6/9/2008, by Don Schrack at http://www.bovinevetonline.com/newsCN.asp?contentid=326811 accessed October 26, 2009.
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Simple English

Persian lime
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Subclass: Rosidae
Order: Sapindales
Family: Rutaceae
Genus: Citrus
Species: C. latifolia
Binomial name
Citrus latifolia
(Yu. Tanaka) Tanaka


Persian Lime (Citrus x latifolia), also known as Tahiti lime or Bearss lime is a kind of citrus fruit. It is the primary citrus fruit grown commercially in the U.S. It is sold simply as a "lime". The fruit is about 6 cm in diameter. Very often, it has slightly nippled ends. It is usually sold quite green, although it yellows as it reaches full ripeness. It is larger, thicker-skinned, and less aromatic than the key lime. The key lime is grown more often worldwide. The Persian lime is bigger than the key lime, and has fewer seeds. The plant is also hardier, and has no thorns on the bushes. The fruit also has a longer shelf life.


Persian limes are less acidic than key limes and do not have the bitterness that lends to the key lime's unique flavour. Persian limes are sold primarily in six sizes, known as 110's, 150's, 175's, 200's, 230's and 250's. They are grown primarily in Florida in the U.S. The Persian lime became more important when key lime orchards were wiped out by a hurricane in 1926. Persian lime orchards themselves were devastated by Hurricane Andrew in 1992. Large numbers of Persian limes are grown, processed and exported every year primarily from Martínez de la Torre, Veracruz, Mexico, to the American, European and Asian markets. U.S. Persian lime imports from Mexico are handled mostly through McAllen, Texas.

References


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