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Book of Philippians
Chapter 4
1

2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23

17: ουχ οτι επιζητω το δομα αλλ επιζητω τον καρπον τον πλεοναζοντα εις λογον υμων— edit Textus Receptus
17: Not because I desire a gift: but I desire fruit that may abound to your account.— edit KJV text
17: Not that I seek the gift: but I seek the fruit that may abound to your account.— edit Douay text


Not because I desire a gift. "The reason why I rejoice in the reception of what you have sent to me is not that I am covetous." From the interest with which he had spoken of their attention to him, some might, perhaps, be disposed to say that it arose from this cause, he says, therefore, that, grateful as he was for the favour which he had received, his chief interest in it arose from the fact that it would contribute ultimately to their own good. It showed that they were governed by Christian principle, and this would not fail to be rewarded. What Paul states here is by no means impossible, though it may not be very common. In the reception of favours from others, it is practicable to rejoice in them mainly, because their bestowment will be a means of good to the benefactor himself. All our selfish feelings and gratifications may be absorbed and lost in the superior joy which we have in seeing others actuated by a right spirit, and in the belief that they will be rewarded. This feeling is one of the fruits of Christian kindness. It is that which leads us to look away from self, and to rejoice in every evidence that others will be made happy.

I desire fruit. The word "fruit" is often used in the Scriptures, as elsewhere, to denote results, or that which is produced. Thus we speak of punishment as the fruit of sin, poverty as the fruit of idleness, and happiness as the fruit of a virtuous life. The language is taken from the fact, that a man reaps or gathers the fruit or result of that which he plants.

To your account, A phase taken from commercial dealings. The apostle wished that it might be set down to their credit, he desired that, when they came to appear before God, they might reap the benefit of all the acts of kindness which they had shown him.

-- edit commentary

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