The Full Wiki

Philosophical novel: Wikis

Advertisements

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

(Redirected to Philosophical fiction article)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Philosophical fiction
Distinctive features Significant proportion devoted to discussion of questions normally addressed in discursive philosophy
Subgenres
Novel of ideas

Philosophical fiction refers to works of fiction in which a significant proportion of the work is devoted to a discussion of the sort of questions normally addressed in discursive philosophy. These might include the function and role of society, the purpose of life, ethics or morals, the role of art in human lives, and the role of experience or reason in the development of knowledge. Philosophical fiction works would include the so-called novel of ideas, including a significant proportion of science fiction, utopian and dystopian fiction, and Bildungsroman. The modus operandi seems to be to use a normal story to simply explain difficult and/or dark parts of human life.

Contents

Prominent philosophical fiction

This is only a list of the major philosophical fiction. For all philosophical novels, see Category:Philosophical novels

There is no universally acceptable definition of philosophical fiction, but certain works would be of key importance in its history.

Author Name Date Notes
Ibn Tufail Philosophus Autodidactus (12th century)[1][2] Early example
Ibn al-Nafis Theologus Autodidactus (13th century)[3] Early example
Voltaire Candide (1759) Early example
Thomas Carlyle Sartor Resartus Canonical
Goethe Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship Canonical
Tolstoy War and Peace Canonical
Robert Musil The Man Without Qualities Canonical
Sartre Nausea Canonical
Ayn Rand Atlas Shrugged
Ayn Rand The Fountainhead
Milan Kundera The Unbearable Lightness of Being
Most of the novels by Albert Camus and Hermann Hesse
Aldous Huxley After Many a Summer
Aldous Huxley Island
Novels by Iris Murdoch, Anthony Burgess, Jean Paul Sartre, Andre Malraux, Marcel Proust Stendhal
C.S. Lewis Space Trilogy
Friedrich Nietzsche Thus Spoke Zarathustra Perhaps the most well-known example of a philosophical novel.

Subgenres

Advertisements

Novel of Ideas

Philosophical novels would include the so-called novel of ideas, including a significant proportion of science fiction, utopian and dystopian fiction, and Bildungsroman.

References

  1. ^ Jon Mcginnis, Classical Arabic Philosophy: An Anthology of Sources, p. 284, Hackett Publishing Company, ISBN 0-87220-871-0.
  2. ^ Samar Attar, The Vital Roots of European Enlightenment: Ibn Tufayl's Influence on Modern Western Thought, Lexington Books, ISBN 0-7391-1989-3.
  3. ^ Muhsin Mahdi (1974), "The Theologus Autodidactus of Ibn at-Nafis by Max Meyerhof, Joseph Schacht", Journal of the American Oriental Society 94 (2), p. 232-234.

External Links


Philosophical novels are works of fiction in which a significant proportion of the novel is devoted to a discussion of the sort of questions normally addressed in discursive philosophy. These might include the function and role of society, the purpose of life, ethics or morals, the role of art in human lives, and the role of experience or reason in the development of knowledge. Philosophical novels would include the so-called novel of ideas, including a significant proportion of science fiction, utopian/dystopian novels, and Bildungsroman.

There is no universally acceptable definition of the philosophical novel, but certain novels would be of key importance in its history. Ibn Tufail's Philosophus Autodidactus (12th century),[1][2] Ibn al-Nafis' Theologus Autodidactus (13th century)[3] and Voltaire's Candide (1759) are the first clear examples in literary history. Thomas Carlyle's Sartor Resartus, Goethe's Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship, Tolstoy's War and Peace, Robert Musil's The Man Without Qualities and Sartre's Nausea are all canonical examples of the philosophical novel. Later examples would include such novels as Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged and The Fountainhead, Aldous Huxley's After Many a Summer and Island, as well as novels by Iris Murdoch and Anthony Burgess and C.S. Lewis' Space Trilogy. Friedrich Nietzsche's Thus Spoke Zarathustra is perhaps the most well-known example of a philosophical novel.

Novels that might qualify as philosophical novels in terms of subject matter but which proceed by non-discursive means (such as allegory) would be excluded. Richard Adams's Watership Down, for example, would qualify as having social structures as its subject matter but would be excluded on the grounds that the exploration of these subjects is entirely inferred rather than being the subject of overt discussion or debate.

The classification may also extend to other narrative media, such as film. The Matrix Trilogy, written and directed by the Wachowski Brothers, contains a number of dialogue scenes that appear to explicitly discuss philosophical concepts and their relationship to the human condition.[1] Other such films containing similar scenes include Mamoru Oshii's Ghost in the Shell duology.

References

  1. Jon Mcginnis, Classical Arabic Philosophy: An Anthology of Sources, p. 284, Hackett Publishing Company, ISBN 0872208710.
  2. Samar Attar, The Vital Roots of European Enlightenment: Ibn Tufayl's Influence on Modern Western Thought, Lexington Books, ISBN 0739119893.
  3. Muhsin Mahdi (1974), "The Theologus Autodidactus of Ibn at-Nafis by Max Meyerhof, Joseph Schacht", Journal of the American Oriental Society 94 (2), p. 232-234.

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message