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1850 portrait of Phoebe Cary in New York City which hangs in her childhood home in North College Hill, Ohio

Phoebe Cary (September 4, 1824 – July 31, 1871) was an American poet, and the younger sister of poet Alice Cary (1820–1871). The sisters co-published poems in 1849, and then each went on to publish volumes of her own. After their deaths in 1871, joint anthologies of the sisters' unpublished poems were also compiled.

Contents

Biography

Cary Cottage, childhood home of Alice and Phoebe Cary near Cincinnati, Ohio

Phoebe Cary was born on September 4, 1824,[1] in Mount Healthy, Ohio near Cincinnati, and she and her sister Alice were raised on the Clovernook farm in North College Hill, Ohio.[2] While she and her sister were raised in a Universalist household and held political and religious views that were liberal and reformist, they often attended Methodist, Presbyterian, and Congregationalist services and were friendly with ministers of all these denominations and others.[3]

While they occasionally attended school, the sisters were often needed to work at home and so were largely self-educated. More outgoing than her sister, Phoebe was a champion of women's rights and for a short time edited The Revolution, a newspaper published by Susan B. Anthony.[3] In 1848, their poetry was published in the anthology Female Poets of America edited by Rufus Wilmot Griswold and, with his help, Poems of Alice and Phoebe Cary was published in 1849.[2] Poet John Greenleaf Whittier had been invited to provide a preface but refused. He believed their poetry did not need his endorsement and also noted a general dislike for prefaces as a method to "pass off by aid of a known name, what otherwise would not pass current".[4]

Grave of Phoebe Cary and Alice Cary at Green-Wood Cemetery

The sisters' anthology garnered much acclaim, and in 1850 they moved to New York City. There, they often hosted evening receptions on Sundays, some of which were attended by well-known figures such as P. T. Barnum, John Greenleaf Whittier, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton.[2] While in New York, Phoebe published two volumes of exclusively her own poetry: Poems and Parodies and Poems of Faith, Hope, and Love. Additionally, her lyrics appeared in many church hymnals, on Sunday School cards, and in household scrapbooks. One of her hymns, "Nearer Home," was often sung at funerals, including Alice's and her own.[3] Alice died in 1871 from tuberculosis; Phoebe died five months later of hepatitis[2] on July 31, 1871, in Newport, Rhode Island.[5] Her burial was in Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, New York.

Works

  • Poems of Alice and Phoebe Cary (1849)
  • Poems and Parodies (Ticknor, Reed & Fields, Boston 1854)
  • Poems of Faith, Hope, and Love (1867)
  • A Memorial of Alice and Phoebe Cary With Some of Their Later Poems, compiled and edited by Mary Clemmer Ames (1873)
  • The Last Poems of Alice and Phoebe Cary, compiled and edited by Mary Clemmer Ames (1873)
  • Ballads for Little Folk by Alice and Phoebe Cary, compiled and edited by Mary Clemmer Ames (1873)


As editor and compiler:

  • Hymns for all Christians (1869, compiled by Charles Force Deems and Phoebe Cary)


Note: In early volumes, "Cary" was spelled "Carey" in and on Phoebe and Alice Cary's books, and later editions and volumes changed the spelling to "Cary."

References

  1. ^ Ehrlich, Eugene and Gorton Carruth. The Oxford Illustrated Literary Guide to the United States. New York: Oxford University Press, 1982: 297. ISBN 0195031865
  2. ^ a b c d Kane, Paul. Poetry of the American Renaissance. New York: George Braziller, 1995: 297. ISBN 0-8076-1398-3
  3. ^ a b c June Edwards. "The Cary Sisters". Accessed Nov. 29, 2007.
  4. ^ Woodwell, Roland H. John Greenleaf Whittier: A Biography. Haverhill, Massachusetts: Trustees of the John Greenleaf Whittier Homestead, 1985: 232
  5. ^ Ehrlich, Eugene and Gorton Carruth. The Oxford Illustrated Literary Guide to the United States. New York: Oxford University Press, 1982: 69. ISBN 0195031865

External links

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Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

And though hard be the task,
"Keep a stiff upper lip".

Phoebe Cary (September 4, 1824July 31, 1871), with her older sister Alice Cary, co-published poems in 1849. They lived on the Clovernook farm in North College Hill, Ohio.

Sourced

  • And though hard be the task,
    "Keep a stiff upper lip".
    • Keep a stiff upper Lip, reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919).
  • Nearer my Father’s house,
    Where the many mansions be,
    Nearer the great white throne,
    Nearer the crystal sea.

    Nearer the bound of life,
    Where we lay our burdens down,
    Nearer leaving the cross,
    Nearer gaining the crown.
    • Nearer Home, reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919).
  • Her washing ended with the day,
    Yet lived she at its close,
    And passed the long, long night away
    In darning ragged hose.

    But when the sun in all its state
    Illumed the Eastern skies,
    She passed about the kitchen grate
    And went to making pies.
    • The Wife, reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919). The second stanza is also found in James Aldrich, A death-bed.

External links

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