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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Phrygian can refer to:


Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

Contents

English

Adjective

Phrygian (not comparable)

Positive
Phrygian

Comparative
not comparable

Superlative
none (absolute)

  1. Of or relating to Phrygia, its people, their language, or their culture.

Derived terms

  • Phrygian cap
  • Phrygian dominant scale
  • Phrygian mode
  • Phrygian Sibyl

Noun

Singular
Phrygian

Plural
Phrygians

Phrygian (plural Phrygians)

  1. A native or inhabitant of Phrygia.

Proper noun

Singular
Phrygian

Plural
-

Phrygian

  1. The language of the Phrygian people.

See also


Bible wiki

Up to date as of January 23, 2010
(Redirected to Phrygia article)

From BibleWiki

Meaning: dry


Phrygia is an irregularly shaped province in Asia Minor. It was divided into two parts, the Greater Phrygia on the south, and the Lesser Phrygia on the west. The Greater Phrygia is spoken of in the New Testament, and included the towns of Antioch in Pisidia (Acts 13:14), Colosse, Hierapolis, Iconium, and Laodicea.

Historic Events

Antiochus the Great transferred 2,000 Jewish families from Mesopotamia and Babylonia to Phrygia and Lydia (Josephus, "Ant." xii. 3, § 4). They settled principally in Laodicea and Apamea.

The Christian Apostles also were familiar with Jews from Phrygia (Acts 2:10). Christian teachings easily gained entry there on account of the numerous Jews in the country. It is noteworthy that in the Phrygian city Mantalos there is an inscription written from right to left (Ramsay, "The Historical Geography of Asia Minor," p. 150, London, 1890).

In the Byzantine period Amorion was a Phrygian city, in which Jews held the supremacy (see Jew. Encyc. iii. 453, s.v. Byzantine Empire). Ibn Khurdadhbah also mentions a Ḥiṣn al-Yahud (= "Jews' Castle"; Ramsay, ib. p. 445) in this region.

Bibliography: Schürer, Gesch. iii. 3, 5, 10, 13; W. M. Ramsay, The Cities and Bishoprics of Phrygia, i., part ii., 667-676, London, 1897.

This entry includes text from the Jewish Encyclopedia, 1906.
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