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Piotr Lenartowicz (born 25 August 1934 Warsaw, Poland) is a Polish philosopher, vitalist, professor of philosophy at the Jesuit University of Philosophy and Education Ignatianum, jesuit.

Contents

Life

Son of Wiesław Lenartowicz and Krystyna Schneider. Completed medical studies at School of Medicine in Warsaw in 1958. In 1961 obtained doctorate in neurophysiology at the School of Medicine in Warsaw [1] Studied philosophy (Lic. in philosophy (Jesuit Faculty of Philosophy, Cracow, 1965) and theology Lic. in theology (Jesuit Faculty of Theology, Warsaw, 1970). Studied philosophy in Rome in the Philosophical Faculty of Pontifical Gregorian University, and received doctorate in developmental biology in 1975. Received another degree (doctor habilitowany) at the Philosophical Faculty of Pontifical Academy of Theology, Cracow working on theory of biological phenomena, in 1986. In 1999 he become full professor. Lenartowicz participated in seminars in Castel Gandolfo invited by John Paul II. Member of the Jesuit University of Philosophy and Education Ignatianum and past vice president of this institution.

Work

His main interests evolves around philosophy of biology including integration of biological phenomena, theory of the genetic program, aristotelian theory of biological substance, cognitive aspects of biological dynamisms, problems of biological observation, experimentation and concept formation, and reconstruction of fossil hominids.

Wrote about principles of the irreducible complexity before this hypothesis gained ground in the US after publication of Michael Behe's Darwin's Black Box. In his dissertation Phenotype-Genotype Dichotomy published in 1975, he described irreducibility of certain biological phenomena. [2].

Notes and references

  1. ^ Philosophia Rationis Magistra Vitae. Tom 1. Chapter. Ks. Piotr Lenartowicz, SJ, pp 53-76. Józef Bremer and Robert Janusz eds, Ignatianum, WAM 2005.
  2. ^ Lenartowicz, P., Fundamental patterns of biochemical integration. Part I. The functional dynamism, Ann. Fac. Philosophicae SJ, Cracoviae 1993, p. 203-217 [1]

Publications

External links

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