The Full Wiki

Piper sarmentosum: Wikis

Advertisements
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Piper sarmentosum
A Piper sarmentosum plant
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Magnoliids
Order: Piperales
Family: Piperaceae
Genus: Piper
Species: P. sarmentosum
Binomial name
Piper sarmentosum
Roxb.

Piper sarmentosum is a plant in the Piperaceae family used in many Southeast Asian cuisines. The leaves are often confused with betel,[1] but they lack the intense taste of the betel leaves and are significantly smaller.

Contents

Names

There is no "official" English name for it, but it is sometimes called "wild betel". It is known as cha plu (ช้าพลู) in Thai, phak i leut in Lao, pokok kadok in Malay, and la lot in Vietnamese.

Geographic distribution

P. sarmentosum is found from the tropical areas of Southeast Asia, Northeast India and South China, and as far as the Andaman Islands.[2]

In cuisine

P. sarmentosum leaves are sold in bunches and are usually eaten raw.

In medicine

P. sarmentosum leaves are used in traditional Asian medicines. Chemical analysis has shown that the leaves contain high amounts of the antioxidant naringenin.[3] Amides from P. sarmentosum fruit have been shown to have anti-tuberculosis and anti-plasmodial activities.[4]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Piper sarmentosum". Asia Food Glossary. Asia Source. http://www.asiafood.org/glossary_2.cfm?wordid=3252. Retrieved 2008-09-08.  
  2. ^ [http://www.ias.ac.in/currsci/jul252004/141.pdf "Piper sarmentosum Roxb. – An addition to the flora of Andaman Islands"]. Current Science 87 (2). July 25, 2004. http://www.ias.ac.in/currsci/jul252004/141.pdf. Retrieved 2008-09-08.  
  3. ^ Subramaniam, Vimala. "Natural Antioxidants: Piper sarmentosum (Kadok) and Morinda elliptica (Mengkudu)". Malaysian Journal of Nutrition 9 (1). http://myais.fsktm.um.edu.my/2713/. Retrieved 2008-09-08.  
  4. ^ "Chemical constituents and bioactivity of Piper sarmentosum". Journal of Ethnopharmacology 93 (2-3). August 2004. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6T8D-4CMW3VJ-1&_user=10&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&view=c&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=16b13555b36dedac944e126335bac61f. Retrieved 2008-09-08.  
Advertisements

Wikispecies

Up to date as of January 23, 2010

From Wikispecies

Taxonavigation

Classification System: APG II (down to family level)

Main Page
Cladus: Eukaryota
Regnum: Plantae
Cladus: Angiospermae
Cladus:Magnoliids
Ordo: Piperales
Familia: Piperaceae
Genus: Piper
Species: Piper sarmentosum

Name

Piper sarmentosum Roxb.

References

  • Flora of India. Calcutta: Botanical Survey of India. 1:162. 1820
  • USDA, ARS, National Genetic Resources Program. Germplasm Resources Information Network - (GRIN) [Online Database]. [1]

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message