Pitch: Wikis

  

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Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Pitch may refer to:

Contents

Sound

Music:

Spatial measurements

Angles:

Spacings:

Sports

Playing fields or their parts:

Persuasion

See also


1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

PITCH. (i) (0.(0. Eng. pic, an adaptation of Lat. pix, picis, Gr. T ivaa, irirra, allied with Gr. wins, pine-tree, Lat. pinus), the name of various substances of dark colour and of extremely viscid and tenacious consistency when subjected to heat. Strictly the term is applied to the resinous substance obtained as a solid residuum by the distillation of wood-tar (see TAR), or the non-resinous substance similarly produced from Coal-tar. The name is also applied to the natural mineral substances, i.e. asphalt or bitumen (qq.v.). (2) A noun of various meanings which are somewhat difficult to connect with the verb from which they apparently must be derived. "To pitch" means primarily to thrust in or fix a stake or other pointed object into the ground, hence to place in a fixed position, set in order, cast or throw, hence to incline or slope. The etymology is obscure, but it appears in Northern dialects as "pick," of which it may be a variant; there is some difficulty in connecting this form with "pick," variant of "pike".


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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010
(Redirected to pitch article)

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

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Contents

English

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Old English piċ, from Latin pix.

Noun

Singular
pitch

Plural
pitches

pitch (plural pitches)

  1. A sticky, gummy substance secreted by trees; sap.
    It is hard to get this pitch off of my hand.
  2. A dark, extremely viscous material remaining in still after distilling crude oil and tar.
    They put pitch on the mast to protect it. The barrel was sealed with pitch.
    It was pitch black because there was no moon.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English pitch (to thrust in, fasten, settle), from Old English

Noun

Singular
pitch

Plural
pitches

pitch (plural pitches)

  1. (baseball) The act of pitching a baseball.
    The pitch was low and inside.
  2. (sports) The field on which cricket, soccer, rugby or field hockey is played.
    The teams met on the pitch.
  3. An effort to sell or promote something.
    He gave me a sales pitch.
  4. The distance between evenly spaced objects, e.g. the teeth of a saw, the turns of a screw thread, or letters in a monospace font.
    The pitch of pixels on the point scale is 72 pixels per inch.
    The pitch of this saw is perfect for that type of wood.
  5. The angle at which an object sits.
    The pitch of the roof or haystack
  6. More specifically, the rotation angle about the transverse axis.
  7. (aviation) A measure of the degree to which an aircraft's nose tilts up or down.
    The pitch of an aircraft
  8. (aviation) A measure of the angle of attack of a propeller.
    The propellor blades' pitch
  9. (nautical) The measure of extent to which a nautical vessel rotates on its athwartships axis, causing its bow and stern to go up and down. Compare with roll, yaw and heave.
  10. The place where a busker performs.
  11. An area in a market (or similar) allocated to a particular trader.
  12. An intensity.
  13. (climbing) A section of a climb or rock face; specifically, the climbing distance between belays or stances.
  14. (caving) A vertical cave passage, only negotiable by using rope or ladders.
    The entrance pitch requires 30 metres of rope.
Translations

Verb

Infinitive
to pitch

Third person singular
pitches

Simple past
pitched

Past participle
pitched

Present participle
pitching

to pitch (third-person singular simple present pitches, present participle pitching, simple past and past participle pitched)

  1. (transitive) To throw.
    He pitched the horseshoe.
  2. (baseball, transitive or intransitive) To throw (the ball) toward home plate.
    (transitive) The hurler pitched a curveball.
    (intransitive) He pitched high and inside.
  3. (baseball, intransitive) To play baseball in the position of pitcher.
    Bob pitches today.
  4. (transitive) To throw away; discard.
    He pitched the candy wrapper.
  5. (transitive) To promote, advertise, or attempt to sell.
    He pitched the idea for months with no takers.
  6. (transitive) To deliver in a certain tone or style, or with a certain audience in mind.
    At which level should I pitch my presentation?
  7. (transitive) To assemble or erect (a tent).
    Pitch the tent over there.
  8. (aviation or nautical, ambitransitive) To move so that the front of an aircraft or ship goes alternatively up and down.
    (transitive) The typhoon pitched the deck of the ship.
    (intransitive) The airplane pitched.
  9. (golf, transitive) To play a short, high, lofty shot that lands with backspin.
    The only way to get on the green from here is to pitch the ball over the bunker.
  10. (cricket, intransitive) To bounce on the playing surface.
    The ball pitched well short of the batsman.
  11. (Bristolian, of snow, intransitive) To settle and build up, without melting.
Translations
Related terms

Etymology 3

Unknown

Noun

Singular
pitch

Plural
pitches

pitch (plural pitches)

  1. (music) The perceived frequency of a sound or note.
    The pitch of middle "C" is familiar to many musicians.
  2. (music) In an a cappella group, the singer responsible for singing a note for the other members to tune themselves by.
    Bob, our pitch, let out a clear middle "C" and our conductor gave the signal to start.
Translations

Verb

Infinitive
to pitch

Third person singular
pitches

Simple past
pitched

Past participle
pitched

Present participle
pitching

to pitch (third-person singular simple present pitches, present participle pitching, simple past and past participle pitched)

  1. To produce a note of a given pitch.

References

  • pitch in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913
  • Notes:
  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 Oxford-Paravia Concise - Dizionario Inglese-Italiano e Italiano-Inglese (in collaborazione con Oxford University Press). Edited by Maria Cristina Bareggi. Torino: Paravia, 2003. ISBN 8839551107. Online version here

Bible wiki

Up to date as of January 23, 2010

From BibleWiki


(Gen 6:14), asphalt or bitumen in its soft state, called "slime" (Gen 11:3; 14:10; Ex 2:3), found in pits near the Dead Sea (q.v.). It was used for various purposes, as the coating of the outside of vessels and in building. Allusion is made in Isa 34:9 to its inflammable character. (See SLIME.)

This entry includes text from Easton's Bible Dictionary, 1897.

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Simple English

Pitch can mean:








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