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Planet 51

Teaser poster
Directed by Jorge Blanco
Javier Abad
Marcos Martínez
Produced by Ignacio Pérez Dolset
Guy Colins
Written by Joe Stillman
Story
Jorge Blanco
Marcos Martínez
Ignacio Pérez Dolset
Javier Abad
Starring Dwayne Johnson
Jessica Biel
Justin Long
Seann William Scott
Gary Oldman
John Cleese
Music by James Seymour Brett
Editing by Alex Rodriguez
Studio Ilion Animation Studios
HandMade Films
Sony Pictures Animation
Distributed by TriStar Pictures
Release date(s) United States
November 14, 2009
(Westwood, California)
(Premiere)

November 20, 2009
(Wide)
United Kingdom
December 4, 2009
Australia
December 10, 2009
Running time 91 minutes
Country Spain
United Kingdom
Language Spanish, English.
Budget $70 million (€49 million)
Gross revenue $103,905,387[1]

Planet 51 is an animated film directed by Jorge Blanco, written by Joe Stillman and starring Dwayne Johnson, Jessica Biel, Justin Long, Seann William Scott, Gary Oldman and John Cleese. Produced by Madrid-based Ilion Animation Studios and HandMade Films for $70 million, it was acquired for US distribution by New Line Cinema in November 2007. Planet 51 was released on November 20, 2009, by Sony Pictures Worldwide via TriStar Pictures. It was originally titled Planet One,[2] but re-named Planet 51. With a budget of about $70 million (€49 million), Planet 51 is the most expensive movie produced in Spain.

Contents

Plot

Outside the theater is town Glipforg on Planet 51, a world populated by little green aliens who live in a society remnant to 1950s USA. Lem (Justin Long) is a teenaged alien who has just gotten a job at the local planetarium museum, and his family and friends are excited about it. His best friend Skiff (Seann William Scott), a geeky alien teen who works at the local comic book store, is a huge fan of the "Humaniacs" films.

When Lem gets home, he asks his next door neighbor and friend, Eckle (Freddie Benedict) about Neera (Jessica Biel), who is Lem's long-time crush. Lem's family is holding a barbecue with the neighbors. Neera is at the barbecue, but when Lem attempts to ask her out, he keeps being interrupted by Neera's hippie friend, Glar.

Meanwhile, a mysterious spacecraft pulls into orbit around Planet 51, sending out a blinking red signal. Down on the planet, under a hidden army base called "Base 9", the aliens' version of Area 51, there is a basement filled with artifacts from Earth. One artifact "wakes up" from the signal; it is a wheeled probe with artificial intelligence, named "Rover." Rover breaks out of the basement and escapes to perform its primary mission: to find the astronaut. Its secondary mission is to collect rocks. The army becomes suspicious of Rover's escape and begins to look into its activity.

Meanwhile, just as the barbecue starts, a spacecraft similar to the lunar module touches down right in Lem's backyard. A NASA Astronaut (Dwayne Johnson), Charles 'Chuck' Baker, emerges. As Chuck plants the U.S. flag, he's startled to step on an alien "rubber ducky" someone left on the ground. Everyone stares, and Chuck attempts to get back into his module - but Eckle is in his way, eager for an autograph. Chuck ends up running about, shocked at the revelation that he's on an inhabited planet. Chuck goes into hiding, while the army arrives on the scene.

Natives of Planet 51.

General Grawl (Gary Oldman) is at the head of the investigation, and consults Professor Kipple (John Cleese) on intelligence about the "alien invader." The army then quarantines the area and has citizens start a local "civil defense" force to protect the citizens from becoming "zombies."

Lem discovers Chuck hiding at the planetarium, and both are surprised to learn they speak the same language. Lem realizes this "alien" is no threat, and decides to help Chuck, though it costs him his job and a near arrest at the hands of the army. It becomes apparent that Chuck can't go anywhere near his module, so Lem hides Chuck in his room for the night.

In the meantime, Rover locates Chuck. Chuck is very happy to see the robot when they reunite, though he tells Rover the probe was not helpful barely escape with Chuck before the general and his men search Lem's room. The group somehow manages to sneak Chuck into the planetarium, and while there, Chuck admits to Lem that he never had "the right stuff." He says that Lem was the one who had "the right stuff" all along, making risks and sacrifices just for a stranger. Chuck also shows Lem the star that Earth orbits, and how the universe is so much bigger than Lem had thought.

The next morning, the army brings in vehicles to take Chuck's module to a secret location. Even the media isn't allowed to tell where the spacecraft is going.

Lem and Skiff are at a loss for getting Chuck reunited with his craft, but they get an idea from the comic book store. The next night is the première of a new "Humaniacs" movie, and a costume contest will be held. Lem, Skiff, and Chuck disguise themselves as costumed fans, though Chuck gets pulled into the contest. Chuck then introduces some new music as part of the contest and teaches Lem on the spot how to dance. Things go well until Rover comes on the scene, and the aliens at the contest freak at the sight of him. Chaos ensues, and army soldiers start unmasking costumed fans, since they believe the "alien" is among them. General Grawl and Professor Kipple are there, and when the general points out that the alien is wearing a "uniform," compared to the other costumed fans, Chuck's United States Flag insignia is a dead giveaway.

Chuck is captured and unmasked for all to see. When Lem tries to defend Chuck and keep him from being taken away, General Grawl labels Lem a zombie, and Professor Kipple announces he will dissect both their brains. Chuck is not willing to drag Lem into this, so he pretends to "release" Lem from his control, and the crowd believes it. Both Chuck and Rover are locked into armored vehicles and taken away, and Lem is proclaimed a hero.

At Base 9, General Grawl attempts to get some answers out of Chuck, warning that if he tries taking over the minds of the soldiers in the room, a chain reaction will set off and everyone will shoot at each other and possibly be electrocuted. Chuck accidentally hits a button and starts said chain reaction, though he's not affected by it. General Grawl mistakes this as resisting his demands, and allows Professor Kipple to have a go at dissecting Chuck's brain.

Lem gets his job back at the planetarium and gets to speak on tv, but he cannot truly accept the honor. He feels terrible about Chuck and decides to do the right thing. He hotwires a car, and while he's in the process, Neera comes to talk to him, admiring what he's doing. Neera, Skiff, and Eckle join Lem as they go off to rescue Chuck. However, not only do they not know where the army took him, but they feel they can't find the astronaut without Rover, who had also been taken by the army. But luck is on their side when the little robot shows up on the edge of town, revealing that he unscrewed all the bolts holding the armored vehicle in which he was imprisoned.

The teens have Rover act as a bloodhound, sniffing out Chuck's trail, leading them to an abandoned gas station in the middle of the desert. They explore, and Skiff sees a "Coca-Cola" bottle in an old fridge, though when he tries to take it, it's actually a hidden trigger that opens up the entrance to Base 9. Lem has Glar distract the soldiers guarding the base with his protest group while the rest of them sneak into the base.

In a laboratory, Chuck is strapped to a table while Professor Kipple gets ready to take his brain out. Lem and his friends break in through the ceiling, using Rover to scare away the scientists, technicians and guards. They release Chuck and immediately set off alarms by doing so.

Rover helps the group find Chuck's 'lunar' module, which had been placed in a hangar, but General Grawl stops them. He warns that if the "alien" attempts to leave, the entire hangar will blow up, and reveals the place is rigged with bombs. Lem tries reasoning with Grawl, which in fact is a distraction to set off the bombs and use the confusion to help Chuck escape. Most of the soldiers flee the firestorm, and the General is knocked out amidst the falling debris. Lem, Neera, Eckle, Skiff, and Rover all get into the module, but Chuck decides he can't leave the General to die, and rescues him from the fire.

To escape the growing firestorm, Chuck pilots the ship into orbit around the planet, allowing the alien kids to experience outer space. Kiff, Eckle, and Rover enjoy the weightlessness, General Grawl realizes that Chuck is friendly and hasn't turned him into a zombie, and Lem finally gets to ask Neera out on a date.

Chuck pilots the module back to the planet's surface, and although the army is ready to shoot as everyone walks out, the General stops them from shooting and says that Chuck is with him. Finally the aliens of Planet 51 get to see that Chuck is harmless and never intended to hurt anyone. Chuck lets Rover stay and it becomes Skiff's pet, and Chuck says goodbye to everyone on Planet 51.

As the module is leaving, it's revealed that one of the alien "dogs"(or Xenomorph) snuck on board.

After the credits, it is revealed that Professor Kipple survived the bombing and two soldiers who previously encountered Chuck and Rover bring him down. Chuck leaves Planet 51 peacefully but the alien dog stows away on his ship.

Cast

  • Dwayne Johnson as Captain Charles "Chuck" Baker, one of the protagonists. He is a NASA astronaut from Earth, considered as an alien on Planet 51.
  • Justin Long as Lem. The main protagonist, a teenage alien of Planet 51. Justin Long also voices Rover.
  • Jessica Biel as Neera, Lem's love interest and a female of Planet 51.
  • Seann William Scott as Skiff, Lem's best friend, a nerd that works at a comic store.
  • Gary Oldman as General Grawl: The main antagonist of the film, he merely is afraid of an alien invasion and is convinced that Chuck is an "evil" mind controlling alien that turns people into "alien zombies".
  • John Cleese as Professor Kripple, A phony scientist on Planet 51, determined to study Chuck's brain.
  • Freddie Benedict as Eckle, A young alien of Planet 51, friends with Lem and Skiff.
  • Alan Marriott as Glar, A protesting hippie alien and one of Neera's friends.
  • Mathew Horne as Private Vesklin: A soldier in Planet 51.
  • James Corden as Private Vernkot: Another soldier in Planet 51.

in the Spanish version William Levy voices Chuck and in the Greek version Chuck is voiced by Sakis Rouvas.

Production and release

The film, which cost approximately $70 million, finished production by June 2009.[3] It was scheduled for release on November 20, 2009 by Sony Pictures Worldwide via their TriStar Pictures division.[4] In November 2007, TriStar Pictures had picked up the film's domestic distribution rights; the studio itself was to release the film in the summer of 2009. However, the film’s producers insisted on a November release. TriStar Pictures became the film's home after New Line Cinema became a division of Warner Bros.

The film is directed by Jorge Blanco, Javier Abad and Marcos Martínez.

Home media

The film was released on Blu-ray and DVD March 9, 2010.

Reception

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Critical reaction

The film has received negative reviews from critics. [5] Rotten Tomatoes reported that 23% of critics gave the film positive reviews based on 97 reviews with an average score of 4.1/10.[6]. Another review aggregator, Metacritic, which assigns a normalized rating from 100 top reviews from mainstream critics, gave the film an average score of 39% based on 19 reviews. [7]

Adam Markovitz of Entertainment Weekly graded the film a B regarding the film "delivers a few pleasant surprises, including a smart story".[8] Roger Ebert of the Chicago Sun-Times gave the film 2½ stars, but positively wrote of the film being "perfectly pleasant as kiddie entertainment, although wall-to-wall with pop references to the American 1950s." [9] However, some critics such as Markovitz [8], Steven Rea of the Philadelphia Inquirer [10], and Brain Miller of Village Voice [11] acknowledged the film as "an E.T. in reverse".

Box Office

Despite mostly negative reviews, the film has done well at the box office. The film was released in 3,035 theaters, grossing $3.2 million on its opening day and $12.6 million over the weekend, resulting in the number four position at the box office behind 2012, The Blind Side and New Moon respectively.[12]

The film's American box office is over $40 million [13]

Its Spanish box office is over €10 million [14]

The film has grossed over $42,194,060 domestically and $61,711,327 in foreign countries for a worldwide gross of $103,905,387[15]

Video game

A video game based on the film was announced in November 2009. The game was published by Sega and was released on Nintendo DS, Wii, Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 on November 17, 2009. The console versions was developed by Pyro Studios and the Nintendo DS version is developed by Firebrand Games.

There are also official games for iPhone, mobile devices and Facebook, developed by Zed Worldwide, which belongs to the Ilion's owner's brother.

"Planet One" name change issue

The name change from "Planet One" to "Planet 51" was a result of the demands made from another entity branded, "Planet One", the American owners of the "Planet One" trademark (they produce children's and teen TV programming). They made contact with the film's producers early on to resolve the trademark and brand confusion issues. The Spanish based film company made an offer to Planet One for all ownership rights to their "Planet One" trademarks and related website URLs. Planet One chose not to take that offer and to protect their brand and trademarks that have been active for many years. As a result, the film's producers chose to rename the film, "Planet 51," likely as a reference to Area 51, an alleged secret repository of extraterrestrial artifacts in the United States.

References

  1. ^ http://boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=planet51.htm
  2. ^ *"Planet One Poster" from TrailerAddict, 12 December 2007.
  3. ^ "ILION AND HANDMADE FILMS TAKE NEW LINE TO ANOTHER PLANET". Ilion Animation Studios. 2007-11-26. http://www.ilion.com/home/downloads/planet51_Press_Reelase_11.26.07.doc. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  4. ^ "Planet 51". ComingSoon.net. http://www.comingsoon.net/films.php?id=39626. Retrieved 2008-01-30. 
  5. ^ "Planet 51 (2009): Reviews". CNET Networks. Metacritic. http://www.metacritic.com/film/titles/planet51. Retrieved 2009-11-22. 
  6. ^ "Planet 51 Movie Reviews, Pictures". IGN Entertainment. Rotten Tomatoes. http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/planet_51/. Retrieved 2009-11-22. 
  7. ^ "Planet 51 (2009): Reviews". CNET Networks. Metacritic. http://www.metacritic.com/film/titles/planet51. Retrieved 2009-11-22. 
  8. ^ a b "Planet 51 Movie Review". Entertainment Weekly. 2009-11-18. http://www.ew.com/ew/article/0,,20320746,00.html. Retrieved 2009-11-22. 
  9. ^ "Planet 51 Movie Review". Chicago Sun-Times. 2009-11-18. http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20091118/REVIEWS/911189999. Retrieved 2009-11-22. 
  10. ^ "The astronaut's the alien on 'Planet 51'". Philadelphia Inquirer. 2009-11-20. http://www.philly.com/inquirer/columnists/steven_rea/20091120_The_astronaut_s_the_alien_on__Planet_51_.html. Retrieved 2009-11-22. 
  11. ^ "The Pleasantly Mediocre Planet 51". Village Voice. 2009-11-17. http://www.villagevoice.com/2009-11-17/film/the-pleasantly-mediocre-planet-51. Retrieved 2009-11-22. 
  12. ^ "'New Moon' wolfs down $140.7M in opening weekend". Associated Press. Google News. http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5ia1FPSxXY_CtWNU2djwNxRbGiU3wD9C4PPCO1. Retrieved 2009-11-22. 
  13. ^ "'Planet 51'". http://boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=planet51.htm. 
  14. ^ "Spanish Ministry of Culture: Planet 51". http://www.mcu.es/bbddpeliculas/buscarDetallePeliculas.do?brscgi_DOCN=000043153&brscgi_BCSID=835b4e1d&language=es&prev_layout=bbddpeliculasResultado&layout=bbddpeliculasDetalle&cache=init. 
  15. ^ http://boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=planet51.htm

External links


Gaming

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From Wikia Gaming, your source for walkthroughs, games, guides, and more!

Planet 51

Developer(s) Pyro Studios
Publisher(s) Sega
Release date Q4 2009 (NA)
TBA (UK)
Genre Action game
Mode(s) Single player
Age rating(s) ESRB: RP
Platform(s) PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, Wii and Nintendo DS
Credits | Soundtrack | Codes | Walkthrough

Planet 51 has first been revealed publicly on 1 March 2009, and it will be released in Q4 2009 in America for the PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, Wii and Nintendo DS. Sega has annouced a partnership with Pyro Studios to create the video game based on the film Planet 51[1]

References

  1. http://uk.gamespot.com/xbox360/action/planet51/index.html
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