The Full Wiki

Poker: Wikis

  
  
  
  
  

Did you know ...


More interesting facts on Poker

Include this on your site/blog:

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A game of Texas hold 'em in progress. "Hold 'em" is currently the most popular form of poker.
Poker is a family of card games that share betting rules and usually (but not always) hand rankings. Poker games differ in how the cards are dealt, how hands may be formed, whether the high or low hand wins the pot in a showdown (in some games, the pot is split between the high and low hands), limits on bets and how many rounds of betting are allowed. In most modern poker games, the first round of betting begins with some form of forced bet. The action then proceeds to the left. Each player in turn must either match the maximum previous bet or fold, losing the amount bet so far and all further interest in the hand. A player who matches a bet may also raise, increasing the bet. The betting round ends when all players have either matched the last bet or folded. If all but one player folds on any round, the remaining player collects the pot without showing his hand. If more than one player remains in contention after the final betting round, the hands are shown and the winning hand takes the pot.[1]
With the exception of initial forced bets, money is only placed into the pot voluntarily by a player who, at least in theory, rationally believes the bet has positive expected value. Thus while the outcome of any particular hand is determined mostly by chance, the long-run expectations of the players are determined by their actions chosen based on probability and psychology.

Contents

History

The history of poker is the subject of some debate. One of the earliest known games to incorporate betting, hand rankings, and bluffing was the 15th century German game Pochspiel. Poker closely resembles the Persian game of As Nas, though there is no specific description of nas prior to 1890.[2] In the 1937 edition of Foster's Complete Hoyle, R. F. Foster wrote: "the game of poker, as first played in the United States, five cards to each player from a twenty-card pack, is undoubtedly the Persian game of as nas."[3][4] By 1990s some gaming historians including David Parlett started to challenge the notion that poker is a direct derivative of As Nas.[3] There is evidence that a game called poque, a French game similar to poker, was played around the region where poker is said to have originated. The name of the game likely descended from the Irish Poca (Pron. Pokah) ('Pocket') or even the French poque, which descended from the German pochen ('to brag as a bluff' lit. 'to knock').[5] Yet it is not clear whether the origins of poker itself lie with the games bearing those names. It is commonly regarded as sharing ancestry with the Renaissance game of primero and the French brelan. The English game brag (earlier bragg) clearly descended from brelan and incorporated bluffing (though the concept was known in other games by that time).[6] It is quite possible that all of these earlier games influenced the development of poker as it exists now.
Harry Truman's poker chips
A modern school of thought rejects these ancestries.[7] They focus on the card play in poker, which is trivial and could have been derived from any number of games, or made up on general cardplay principles.[8] The unique features of poker have to do with the betting, and do not appear in any known older game.[9] In this view poker originated much earlier, in the early or mid-1700s, and spread throughout the Mississippi River region by 1800. It was played in a variety of forms, with 52 cards, and included both straight poker and stud. 20 card poker was a variant for two players (it is a common English practice to reduce the deck in card games when there are fewer players).[10] The development of poker is linked to the historical movement that also saw the invention of commercial gambling.[1][11]
English actor Joseph Crowell reported that the game was played in New Orleans in 1829, with a deck of 20 cards and four players betting on which player's hand was the most valuable. Jonathan H. Green's book, An Exposure of the Arts and Miseries of Gambling (G. B. Zieber, Philadelphia, 1843), described the spread of the game from there to the rest of the country by Mississippi riverboats, on which gambling was a common pastime. As it spread north along the Mississippi River and to the West during the gold rush, it is thought to have become a part of the frontier pioneer ethos.
Soon after this spread, the full 52-card English deck was used and the flush was introduced. The draw was added prior to 1850 (when it was first mentioned in print in a handbook of games).[12] During the American Civil War, many additions were made including stud poker (the five-card variant), and the straight. Further American developments followed, such as the wild card (around 1875), lowball and split-pot poker (around 1900), and community card poker games (around 1925).
The game and jargon of poker have become important parts of American culture and English culture. Such phrases and clichés as ace in the hole, ace up one's sleeve, beats me, blue chip, call one's bluff, cash in, high roller, pass the buck, poker face, stack up, up the ante, when the chips are down, wild card, and others are used in everyday conversation, even by those unaware of their origins at the poker table.
Beginning in 1970 a series of developments led to poker becoming far more popular than it was previously:
Poker's popularity experienced an unprecedented spike at the beginning of the 21st century, largely because of the introduction of online poker and hole-card camera, which turned the game into a spectator sport. Viewers could now follow the action and drama of the game, and broadcasts of poker tournaments such as the World Series of Poker and the World Poker Tour brought in huge audiences for cable and satellite TV distributors. Because of the increasing coverage of poker events, poker pros became celebrities, with poker fans all over the world entering into expensive tournaments for the chance to play with them. .This increased camera exposure also brings a new dimension to the poker professional's game—the realization that their actions may be aired later on TV.^ Scrumper Naruto Meatball Tank Rocket Assault Air Traffic Mania Lunar View more Action Games .

Since 2003, major poker tournament fields have grown dramatically, in part because of the growing popularity of online satellite-qualifier tournaments where the prize is an entry into a major tournament. The 2003 and 2004 World Series Of Poker champions, Chris Moneymaker and Greg Raymer, respectively, won their seats to the main event by winning online satellites.[16] After the passage of the UIGEA in October 2006, attendance at live tournaments as well as participation in live and online cash games initially slowed, however they are still growing and far more popular today than they were prior to 2003.

Gameplay

In casual play, the right to deal a hand typically rotates among the players and is marked by a token called a dealer button (or buck). In a casino, a house dealer handles the cards for each hand, but the button (typically a white plastic disk) is rotated clockwise among the players to indicate a nominal dealer to determine the order of betting.
One or more players are usually required to make forced bets, usually either an ante or a blind bet (sometimes both). The dealer shuffles the cards, the player on the chair to their right cuts, and the dealer deals the appropriate number of cards to the players one at a time, beginning with the player to their left. Cards may be dealt either face-up or face-down, depending on the variant of poker being played. After the initial deal, the first of what may be several betting rounds begins. Between rounds, the players' hands develop in some way, often by being dealt additional cards or replacing cards previously dealt. At the end of each round, all bets are gathered into the central pot.
At any time during a betting round, if one player bets and no opponents choose to call (match) the bet and instead fold, the hand ends immediately, the bettor is awarded the pot, no cards are required to be shown, and the next hand begins. This is what makes bluffing possible. Bluffing is a primary feature of poker, one that distinguishes it from other vying games and from other games that make use of poker hand rankings.
At the end of the last betting round, if more than one player remains, there is a showdown, in which the players reveal their previously hidden cards and evaluate their hands. The player with the best hand according to the poker variant being played wins the pot. A poker hand consists of five cards, but in some variants a player has more than five to choose from.
See betting (poker) for detailed rules regarding forced bets, betting actions, limits, stakes, and all-in situations. See list of poker variants and poker hand rankings for order of play and other details for the most common poker variants.

Variations

WSOP Main Event Table
Poker has many variations, all following a similar pattern of play and generally using the same hand ranking hierarchy. There are three main families of variants, largely grouped by the protocol of card-dealing and betting:
Straight
A complete hand is dealt to each player, and players bet in one round, with raising and re-raising allowed. This is the oldest poker family; the root of the game as currently played was a game known as Primero, which evolved into the game three-card brag, a very popular gentleman's game around the time of the American Revolutionary War and still enjoyed in the U.K. today. Straight hands of five cards are sometimes used as a final showdown, but poker is currently virtually always played in a more complex form to allow for additional strategy.
Stud poker
Cards are dealt in a prearranged combination of face-down and face-up rounds, or streets, with a round of betting following each. This is the next-oldest family; as poker progressed from three to five-card hands, they were often dealt one card at a time, either face-down or face-up, with a betting round between each. .The most popular stud variant today, seven-card stud, deals two extra cards to each player (three face-down, four face-up) from which they must make the best possible 5-card hand.^ Solitaire 2 One of the most popular card games ...
  • Free Flash Games Online Free Download Multiplayer Ubuntu 16 January 2010 3:29 UTC www.zoopgames.com [Source type: General]

Draw poker
A complete hand is dealt to each player, face-down, and after betting, players are allowed to attempt to change their hand (with the object of improving it) by discarding unwanted cards and being dealt new ones. Five-card draw is the most famous variation in this family.
Community card poker (also known as flop poker)
A variation of Stud, players are dealt an incomplete hand of face-down cards, and then a number of face-up community cards are dealt to the center of the table, each of which can be used by one or more of the players to make a 5-card hand. Texas hold-em and Omaha are two well-known variants of the Community family.
Other games that use poker hand rankings may likewise be referred to as poker. .Video poker is a single-player computer game that functions much like a slot machine; most video poker machines play draw poker, where the player bets, a hand is dealt, and the player can discard and replace cards.^ When it comes to online poker play, the variety of games available is comprehensive, and players can play any game that they want and even try out games they've never seen before like at the online casinos .If you're looking for something a little different why not try playing free flash casino games at one of the most reputable casino sites we've found online.
  • Free Flash Games Online Free Download Multiplayer Ubuntu 16 January 2010 3:29 UTC www.zoopgames.com [Source type: General]

Payout is dependent on the hand resulting after the draw and the player's initial bet.
Strip poker is a traditional poker variation where players remove clothing when they lose bets. Since it depends only on the basic mechanic of betting in rounds, strip poker can be played with any form of poker; however, it is usually based on simple variants with few betting rounds, like five card draw.
Another game with the poker name, but with a vastly different mode of play, is called Acey-Deucey or Red Dog poker. .This game is more similar to Blackjack in its layout and betting; each player bets against the house, and then is dealt two cards.^ Regal Solitaire Spider soli Speed Spider Solitaire Pyramids View more Card Games .

^ Blackjack green table Shell Game Roulette Armor Black Jack Slotmachine View more ...
  • Free Flash Games Online Free Download Multiplayer Ubuntu 16 January 2010 3:29 UTC www.zoopgames.com [Source type: General]

^ Fasthandjacky Crescent Solitaire Deluxe Blackjack Elite Freecell Japanese Roulette View more Casino Games .

For the player to win, the third card dealt (after an opportunity to raise the bet) must have a value in between the first two. Payout is based on the odds that this is possible, based on the difference in values of the first two cards. Other poker-like games played at casinos against the house include three card poker and pai gow poker.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b David G. Schwartz, Roll the Bones: The History of Gambling, Gotham (2007), ISBN 978-1592403165
  2. ^ Pagat.com: A History of Poker by David Parlett
  3. ^ a b "History of Poker". Cardplayer.com. 2009-03-06. http://www.cardplayer.com/history_of_poker/article/7-poque-or-poqas-to-pokuh. Retrieved 2009-03-20. 
  4. ^ "MSN Encarta: Poker". MSN Encarta: Poker. Encarta.msn.com. http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_761574185/Poker.html. Retrieved 2009-03-20. 
  5. ^ "Online Etymology Dictionary — term: poker". Douglas Harper. http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=poker. Retrieved 2007-10-03. 
  6. ^ "MSN Encarta: Poker". MSN Encarta: Poker. Encarta.msn.com. http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_761574185_2/Poker.html. Retrieved 2009-03-20. 
  7. ^ Reuven and Gabrielle Brenner, Gambling and Speculation: A Theory, a History, and a Future of some Human Decisions , Cambridge University Press (1990), ISBN 978-0521381802
  8. ^ Stephen Longstreet, Win or Lose: A Social History of Gambling in America , Bobbs-Merrill (1977), ISBN 978-0672522536
  9. ^ Reuven and Gabrielle Brenner, and Aaron Brown, A World of Chance: Betting on Religion, Games, Wall Street, Cambridge University Press (2008), ISBN 978-04701273152
  10. ^ Aaron Brown, The Poker Face of Wall Street, John Wiley & Sons (2006), ISBN 978-0470127315
  11. ^ Timothy O'Brien, Bad Bet : The Inside Story of the Glamour, Glitz, and Danger of America's Gambling Industry, Crown Business (1998), ISBN 978-0812928075
  12. ^ Henry G. Bond (ed.), Bohn's New Handbook of Games, Henry F. Anners (1850)
  13. ^ "World Series of Poker: A Retrospective". Gaming.unlv.edu. 2007-10-22. http://gaming.unlv.edu/WSOP/history.html. Retrieved 2009-03-20. 
  14. ^ "United States of Poker: New Jersey". Pokerplayernewspaper.com. http://www.pokerplayernewspaper.com/viewarticle.php?id=289. Retrieved 2009-03-20. 
  15. ^ "Late Night Poker: About the Show". Channel4.com. http://www.channel4.com/entertainment/tv/microsites/P/poker/about_the_show.html. Retrieved 2009-03-20. 
  16. ^ "Chris Moneymaker on". Answers.com. 1975-11-21. http://www.answers.com/topic/chris-moneymaker. Retrieved 2009-03-20. 

External links


1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

POKER, a game at cards. By most writers its origin has been ascribed to Il Frusso, an Italian game of the 15th century, from which the game of Primiera, called in Spain Primero, and La Prime in France, in which country it was elaborated into L'Ambigu or Le Mesle. In England the game was played under the name of Post and Pair, of which the modern Brag is only a variation. But Mr R. F. Foster proves that, though poker is probably a descendant of Primero, and perhaps of a much more ancient Persian game called As ras, it is not a development of the English Brag, but was introduced from France into the colony of Louisiana, the name being merely an English mispronunciation of Pogue, a game described as early as 1718 in the Academie universelle des jeux, and still played in Germany under the name Pochen. The earliest mention of the game in America is in G. B. Zieber's Exposure of the 'Arts and Miseries of Gambling (1843), and it is probable that poker was generally play.ed on the Mississippi steamboats as early as 1830, twenty cards being used, "full-deck poker" with 52 cards being invented later. "Draw-poker" was introduced about 1860.
Poker is played for money stakes, markers or "chips" of different value being used. These are either divided equally among the players, or, more usually, one player acts as banker and sells chips to the other players, redeeming them at the end of the game. There are several varieties of the game, but Draw Poker, played by from 2 to 6 or even 7 persons with a pack of 52 cards, is the most popular. The player who wins the cut for deal shuffles the pack, which is then cut by the player at his right. He then deals five cards, one by one, to each player. If a card is faced during the deal the player must accept it; if two are exposed a new deal must ensue. Before the deal is complete the player at the dealer's left, who is said to hold the age, and is called "the age," places (or puts up) on the table in front of him half the stake for which he wishes to play. This is called blind. The player at the age's left then looks at his hand and announces whether he will play. If his hand seems too weak he throws his cards away face-down and "drops out" of the game. .If he elects to play he puts up his ante, which is twice the amount of the blind. The other players, including the dealer, then either come in, i.e. elect to play, each putting up his ante, or, deeming their hands worthless, drop out.^ Mob Pay Back Bouncin Bop Global Player Dealer Bow Adventure View more Role Playing Games .

The age, who has the last say, may then himself drop out, forfeiting his half-stake already put up, or he may come in and make good his ante, i.e. put up his unpaid half of the blind. Each player in his turn has the privilege of increasing the stake to any amount not exceeding the limit, 1 which is always agreed upon before the game begins. Thus, if the limit is i, and the age has put up 6d. as his blind, any player may, when his turn comes to declare whether he will play, say, "I play and make it 1 os. (or a sovereign) more to draw cards," at the same time placing the ante plus ios. (or a sovereign) in the middle of the table. Thereupon all the other players, each in turn, must see the raise, i.e. pay in the additional sum, or drop out of the game, forfeiting what they have already paid into the pool. The "age" being the last to complete, is in the best position to raise, as a player who has already completed is less likely to sacrifice his stake and withdraw from the game. On the other hand each player 1 "Table stakes" means playing strictly for cash; "unlimited" explains itself, although even when this is the rule a certain high limit is pretty generally observed.
has the right, in his turn, after paying the extra stake called for, of raising it further on his own account, and this goes on until the players who have not dropped out have paid an equal sum into the pool and no one cares to raise further. Each player then throws away as many of his five cards as he chooses and receives from the dealer new ones in their place. In this supplementary deal no player may accept a faced card, but receives one in its place after all the other players have been served. The number of new cards taken by each one should be carefully noted by the other players, as it gives a valuable clue to the probable value of his hand. The following list shows the value of hands, beginning with the lowest.
x. One Pair (accompanied by three cards of different denominations). If two players each hold a pair, the higher wins; if similar pairs (e.g. a pair of kings each) then the next highest card wins.
2. Two Pairs. 3. Triplets or Threes of a Kind (e.g. three kings, accompanied by two other cards not forming a pair).
4. Straight, a sequence of five cards, not all of the same suit. Sometimes, but very rarely, these straights are not admitted. An ace may either begin or end a straight. For example: ace, king, queen, knave and io is the highest straight; 5, 4, 3, 2, and ace is the lowest. An ace cannot be in the middle. For example, 3, 2, ace, king, queen is not a straight.
5. Flush, five cards of the same suit, not in sequence. If two flushes are held, that containing the highest card. wins; if the highest cards are similar, the next highest wins, &c.
6. Full, or Full House, meaning three cards of the same denomination together with a pair; e.g. three sixes and a pair of fours. If more than one player holds a full, the highest triplet wins.
7. Fours, or four cards of the same denomination; e.g. four queens, which beat four knaves and under.
8. Straight Flush, a sequence of five cards all of the same suit; e.g. knave, 10, 9, 8, 7, of hearts.
9. Royal Flush, the highest possible straight flush; e.g. ace, king, queen, knave and to of spades.
If no player holds at least one pair, then the hand containing the highest card wins.
Each player having received the new cards called for, the betting is opened by the player sitting at the age's left, should ho consider his hand worth it; otherwise he throws down his cards and is out of the game, and the next player (whom we will call C) makes the first bet, which may be of any amount up to the limit, but is usually a small one, with a view to later developments. The next player, D, either drops out, trails, i.e. puts up the amount bet by C (also called seeing and calling), or raises C's bet; in other words puts in the amount bet by C plus as much more (within the limit) as he cares to risk. This raise on D's part means either that he thinks he holds a better hand than C, or that he is trying to frighten C out. The last manoeuvre illustrates the principle of the bluff , the most salient characteristic of the game of Poker. If C, with two small pairs in the hand, bets half a crown, and D, with a hand of no value whatever, covers, or sees C's bet and raises it to a sovereign, it is very likely that C will throw down his cards rather than risk a sovereign on his own by no means strong hand. In this case C has been bluffed by D, who, without even having to show his cards, wins the pool, although intrinsically his hand was far inferior to C's. The ability to bluff successfully depends upon self-command, keen observation, judgment and knowledge of character, so as to attempt the bluff when the bluffer is sure that there are no very strong hands out against him. Other wise he will surely be called in his turn, and, having nothing of value, will lose the pool, besides suffering the ignominy of throwing away his money for nothing.
Two players with strong hands will often raise each other's bets repeatedly, until one of them calls the other, upon which the hands are shown and the stronger wins. The complete hands of the caller and the called must be shown. The common practice of throwing away unshown, for purposes of concealment, a losing hand that has called is illegal. No player who is not called is obliged to show his hand, so that the company is often in doubt whether or not the winner has bluffed. When two hands are of exactly equal value the pool is divided.
The game is often varied by a player going blind, i.e. raising the ante before the deal. Another variation is straddling the blind. This is done by the player sitting next the age, who puts up twice the amount of the blind with the words "I straddle." This has the effect of doubling the stake, as every player must then pay twice the amount of the straddle (instead of the blind) in order to play. The straddle may be straddled again in its turn if the aggregate amount does not pass the limit. The straddle does not carry with it the privilege of betting last, but merely raises the amount of the stake.
The regular Draw-Poker game is usually varied by occasional Jack-Pots, which are played once in so many deals, or when all have refused to play, or when the player deals who holds the buck, a marker placed in the pool with every jack-pot. In a jack-pot each player puts up an equal stake and receives a hand. The pot must then be opened by a player holding a hand of the value of a pair of knaves (jacks) or better. If no player holds so valuable a hand the deal passes and each player adds a small sum to the pot or pool. When the pot is opened the opener does so by putting up any sum he chooses, within the limit; and his companions must pay in the same amount or "drop." They also possess the right to raise the opener. The new cards called for are then dealt and the opener starts the betting, the play proceeding as in the regular game. If Progressive Jack-Pots are played, the minimum value of the opening hand is raised one degree every deal in which the pot is not opened. Thus the opening hand must in the first deal be at least a pair of knaves; but if the pot is not opened the minimum for the second deal is a pair of queens, for the third a pair of kings, &c. Jack-Pots were introduced about 1870.
Straight Poker, or Bluff , is played without drawing extra cards. It was the only variety of the game played, although 52 cards are now used instead of 20, as formerly. The first dealer is provided with a marker called a buck, and having, before dealing, put up the antes of all the players, passes the buck to the next dealer, who must in his turn ante for all when he deals. The rules for betting, raising, &c., are the same as at DrawPoker. The hands, of course, average smaller.
Stud-Poker is played like Draw-Poker, except that there is no draw and, in dealing, the first card only is dealt face down, the rest being exposed. Each player in turn looks at his turned card and makes his bet or raise. A common variation of StudPoker consists in stopping the deal after two cards, one face up and the other face down, have been dealt, and betting on those two cards. A third card is then dealt and betting again takes place, the process being repeated after the fourth and fifth cards have been dealt, the value of the different hands changing with each added card. A player failing to "stand" any raise must retire from that pot.
Whiskey-Poker is also played without a draw. An extra hand, called the widow, is dealt to the table face down. The first bettor then examines his ':and and has the option of taking up the widow and placing his own hand on the table face up in its place, or of passing and allowing the following players in turn the choice. After an exposed hand has been laid on the table in place of the widow the next player may either take up one card from the new widow replacing it with one from his own hand, or he may exchange his entire hand for the widow, or he may knock on the table. If he knocks every other player in turn may exchange one card or his whole hand, and the betting then begins, or there may be an agreement that the best hand wins from all the rest; or that the poorest hand pays a chip to the pool.
Technical Big Dog. - Ace high and nine low it beats a Little Dog. Blaze. - Five court cards; not beats any two pairs. Bobtail. - Four cards of a flush filling.
Table of contents

Bone

The smallest counter or c Buck. - A marker, to show when when it is the holder's deal.
Burnt Card. - Card on the bottom being seen.

Chips

Counters. Terms.; not usually played. If played usually played. If played it or straight, the fifth card not hip.
a jack-pot is to be played, viz.
of the pack turned up to prevent Cold Feet. - Any excuse of a winner for leaving the garie before the time agreed upon.

Deadwood

The discard pile.

Deck

Pack.

Fatten

Adding chips and a jack-pot after a failure to open. Freeze Out. - A game in which a player having lost a certain agreed capital must stop playing.
Inside Straight. - Intermediate straight, e.g. 2, 3, 5, 6. Kilter. - Hand with no pair and no card above the nine; seldom played.

Kitty

A fund, to pay for cards or refreshments, made by taking a chip from each jack-pot, or paid by a winner holding a valuable hand.
Little Dog. - Deuce low and seven high; not usually played. When played it beats a straight.

Milking

Shuffling by taking a card from the top and one from the bottom of the pack with the same movement.

Mistigris

Poker with the joker added; the joker may be called any card the holder chooses.

Monkey Flush

Three cards of a flush.
Natural Jacks. - Jack-pots played because there has been no ante in the previous deal.

Openers

A hand on which a jack-pot may be opened. Pat Hand. - A hand to which no card is drawn.

Pool

The chips in the middle of the table.

Show-down

Laying the hands face-up on the table after a call.

Show

Part of a pool to which a player is entitled who has bet as long as his capital lasted but is not able to stand further raises. If his hand is the best he wins whatever was in the pool at the time when he put into it the last of his capital.

Shy

Not having put up the jack-pot ante.

Splitting

Having opened a jack-pot with one pair, and holding four other cards of one suit, to throw away one of the pair on the chance of making a flush.

Sweeten

Chipping to a jack-pot after a failure to open. Triplets. - Three of a kind.
Under the Gun. - The first player to bet. Whangdoodle. - Compulsory round of jack-pots, usually agreed upon to follow a very large hand.

Widow

An extra hand dealt to the. table, as in Whiskey-Poker. See Practical-Poker, by R. F. Foster (1904), the most authoritative work.
A very important attribute of a successful poker player is sound judgment in discarding, and this is principally based on the following mathematical table of approximate chances.
To improve any hand in the draw, the chances are: - Of course these chances are somewhat improved by the fact that, in actual play, pairs and threes are, on account of careless shuffling, apt to lie together more or less.

Pola >>

Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

See also poker

German

Noun

Poker n.
  1. poker (card game)

Wikibooks

Up to date as of January 23, 2010

From Wikibooks, the open-content textbooks collection

Poker is not a single card game, but a broad class of card games. A poker game can have a simple name like "guts", or it may have a cumbersome name such as "seven card stud eight-or-better high-low split". Most common poker variants, including all those covered in this book, share a fifty-two card "poker deck" (though the playing card deck itself precedes poker by hundreds of years), and certain rules for hand rankings.

Contents

Common principles

Variants

Five Card Draw Games

These games are played by dealing exactly five cards to each player and then allowing a number of cards to be replaced or drawn from the deck. Players must make the best (or worst) hand with the five cards that they end up with after the draw. Each rule set is based on these simple guidelines but alterations are possible.

Five Card Stud Games

These games are played by dealing exactly five cards to each player. Players must make the best (or worst) hand with the five cards that they are dealt. Each rule set is based on these simple guidelines but alterations are possible.

Seven Card Stud Games

.Generally these games are played by dealing seven cards to each player.^ Mob Pay Back Bouncin Bop Global Player Dealer Bow Adventure View more Role Playing Games .

Each player must make the best (or worst) hand from five of their seven cards at the showdown. Each rule set is based on these simple guidelines but alterations are possible.

Community Card Games

Match Pot Games

These games are generally played by creating a hand of cards depending on the specific rules and then making a decision of whether to 'hold' or 'drop' their hand. If a player holds their hand and looses in the showdown then they must 'match the pot'. Each rule set is based on these simple guidelines but alterations are possible.
  • Guts (Two card guts and Three card guts)
  • King Little Man

Three Strikes Games

These games start with a number (usually three) of "stacks" in front of each player. The loser of each hand must put one "stack" into the pot. Players with no "stacks" may no longer play therefore the winner is the last player with at least one stack on the table. Each rule set is based on these simple guidelines but alterations are possible.
  • Scat (31, Blitz)

Strategy


Gaming

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

.From Wikia Gaming, your source for walkthroughs, games, guides, and more!^ More Games for your Wii?
  • Video Games & Computer Games 2 February 2010 14:11 UTC www.buzzle.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Special digital guide with multiple levels of help, making the Myst games more accessible Now fully compatible with Windows XP 1 point .
  • Vintage Computer Games Headquarters 2 February 2010 14:11 UTC www.squidoo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Check out our Holiday Gift Guide, create a wishlist of your most-wanted games, and share it with your friends and family!
  • PC Games - Computer Games - PC Game Cheats - Computer Video Games 2 February 2010 14:11 UTC www.gamespot.com [Source type: General]

Poker is a popular family of card games. Typically, a poker game does not involve manipulation of the cards by the players, only wagering on the relative strength of their hand compared to their opponents' concealed hands. (An exception is draw poker, such as five card draw or lowball.) At the end, the best five-card hand wins the pot.
Poker is usually played with two to ten players, although the practical maximum number of players can vary with each game, with draw usually seating up to six players and hold'em usually seating up to ten. The game is often played in public brick-and-mortar casinos, on the Internet, or in private home games.

Poker games

Poker-like games

.These games are usually casino games that often go by the name of "poker" or "stud", but do not fit the definition of poker above.^ Joomla Templates Enjoy a large selection of flash games such as blackjack and poker inour online casino and try to win the jackpot.
  • Free Flash Games Online Free Download Multiplayer Ubuntu 16 January 2010 3:29 UTC www.zoopgames.com [Source type: General]

  • Caribbean stud
  • Casino stud
  • Video poker

Related subjects

  • Proposition playing

External links

Smallwikipedialogo.png This page uses content from Wikipedia. The original article was at Poker. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with Wikia Gaming, the text of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 (unported) license.
  • rec.gambling.poker Usenet group
  • Two Plus Two (discussion forum)
  • PokerWiki

This article uses material from the "Poker" article on the Gaming wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Simple English

Poker is a game which people play with a normal set (or deck) of 52 cards. Poker is a gambling game which involves some luck, but also some skill. In poker, players make bets against each other depending on the value of their poker hand. Bets are usually made with plastic or ceramic discs called chips. Bets may also be made with real money, but chips are more often used because they are easier to handle and count. At the end of the game, players either swap their chips for money, or the chips are counted to determine the order of winners.

There are many different kinds of poker. In draw poker, each player is dealt five cards. A player can decide to throw away a number of these cards and then take (draw) new cards to replace them.

In stud poker (for example, seven-card stud), some of each player's cards are laid (face-up) on the table so that the other players can see them. In community card poker (for example, Texas hold 'em), players share some of their cards in the center of the table.

Contents

History

The history of poker is a matter of some debate. The name of the game likely descended from the French poque, which descended from the German pochen ('to knock'), but it is not clear whether the origins of poker itself lie with the games bearing those names. It closely resembles the Persian game of as nas, and may have been taught to French settlers in New Orleans by Persian sailors. It is commonly regarded as sharing ancestry with the Renaissance game of primero and the French brelan. The English game brag (earlier bragg) clearly descended from brelan and incorporated bluffing (though the concept was known in other games by that time). It is quite possible that all of these earlier games influenced the development of poker as it exists now.

English actor Joseph Crowell reported that the game was played in New Orleans in 1829, with a deck of 20 cards, four players betting on which player's hand was the most valuable. Jonathan H. Green's book, An Exposure of the Arts and Miseries of Gambling (G. B. Zieber, Philadelphia, 1843), described the spread of the game from there to the rest of the country by Mississippi riverboats, on which gambling was a common pastime.

Soon after this spread, the full 52-card English deck was used, and the flush was introduced. During the American Civil War, many additions were made, including draw poker, stud poker (the five-card variant), and the straight. Further American developments followed, such as the wild card (around 1875), lowball and split-pot poker (around 1900), and community card poker games (around 1925). Spread of the game to other countries, particularly in Asia, is often attributed to the U.S. military.

The game and jargon of poker have become important parts of American culture and English culture. Such phrases as ace in the hole, beats me, blue chip, call the bluff, cash in, pass the buck, poker face, stack up, up the ante, when the chips are down, wild card, and others are used in everyday conversation even by those unaware of their origins at the poker table.

Modern tournament play became popular in American casinos after the World Series of Poker began in 1970. It was also during that decade that the first serious strategy books appeared, notably The Theory of Poker by David Sklansky (ISBN 1880685000), Super System by Doyle Brunson (ISBN 0931444014), and The Book of Tells by Mike Caro (ISBN 0897461002).

Poker’s popularity has experienced an unprecedented spike in recent years, largely due to the introduction of online poker and the invention of the hole-card camera which finally turned the game into a spectator sport. Viewers can now follow the action and drama of the game, and broadcasts of poker tournaments such as the World Series of Poker and the World Poker Tour have brought in huge audiences for cable and satellite TV distributors.

Game play

The game of poker is played in hundreds of variations, but the following overview of game play applies to most of them.

Depending on the game rules, one or more players may be required to place an initial amount of money into the pot before the cards are dealt. These are called forced bets and come in three forms: antes, blinds, and bring-ins.

Like most card games, the dealer shuffles the deck of cards. The deck is then cut, and the appropriate number of cards are dealt face-down to the players. In a casino a "house" dealer handles the cards for each hand, but a button (any small item used as a marker, also called a buck) is rotated among the players to determine the order of dealing and betting in certain games. In a home game, the right to deal the cards typically rotates among the players clockwise, but a button may still be used.

After the initial deal, the first of what may be several betting rounds begins. Between rounds, the players' hands develop in some way, often by being dealt additional cards or replacing cards previously dealt. During a round of betting, there will always be a current bet amount, which is the total amount of money bet in this round by the player who bet last in this round. To keep better track of this, it is conventional for players to not place their bets directly into the pot (called splashing the pot), but rather place them in front of themselves toward the pot, until the betting round is over. When the round is over, the bets are then gathered into the pot.

After the first betting round is completed (every participating player having called an equal amount), there may be more rounds in which more cards are dealt in various ways, followed by further rounds of betting (into the same central pot). At any time during the first or subsequent betting rounds, if one player makes a bet and all other players fold, the deal ends immediately, the single remaining player is awarded the pot, no cards are shown, no more rounds are dealt, and the next deal begins. This is what makes it possible to bluff.

At the end of the last betting round, if more than one player remains, there is a showdown in which the players reveal their previously hidden cards and evaluate their hands. The player with the best hand according to the poker variant being played wins the pot.

Computer players

Methods are being developed to at least approximate perfect strategy from the game theory perspective in the heads-up (two player) game, and increasingly good systems are being created for the multi-player or ring game. Perfect strategy has multiple meanings in this context. From a game-theoretic optimal point of view, a perfect strategy is a minimax one that cannot expect to lose to any other player's strategy; however, optimal strategy can vary in the presence of sub-optimal players who have weaknesses that can be exploited. In this case, a perfect strategy would be one that correctly or closely models those weaknesses and takes advantage of them to make a profit. Some of these systems are based on Bayes theorem, Nash equilibrium, Monte Carlo simulation, and Neural networks. A large amount of the research is being done at the University of Alberta by the GAMES group led by Jonathan Schaeffer who developed Poki and PsOpt.

A major part of the skill of live poker games, however, is guessing at the strength of a player's hand by identifying tells made by other players, while concealing one's own, unlike, for example, chess, where all information about the game's current state is public. As a computer would not make any tells, playing against a computer would fundamentally change the nature of the game far more than in games like chess.

Poker variations


Citable sentences

Up to date as of December 21, 2010

Here are sentences from other pages on Poker, which are similar to those in the above article.








Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message