Political party strength in U.S. states: Wikis

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Registered Democrats, Republicans and independents in the United States as of January 2004.[1]

The following table shows all the U.S. states and to what party (Democratic or Republican) their state governors belong. Also indicated is the majority party of the state legislatures' upper and lower houses as well as U.S. Senate representation. Nebraska's legislature is unicameral, i.e., it has only one legislative house and is officially non-partisan, though party affiliation still has an unofficial influence on the legislative process.

Throughout most of the 20th century, although the Republican party often held power at a national level, the Democratic party held almost uncontested power at the state level, especially in the solid South, where the Republican Party was virtually nonexistent. (For much of the 20th century, North Dakota was a one-party Republican state, the only one in the country.)

However, in the 1970s and 1980s, the Republicans slowly increased their strength in the state legislatures, especially in the South, where the increasingly conservative Republican party took the place of the Democrats, who had been weakened by their party's support for the Civil Rights Movement starting in the 1940s. In the 1990s, the Republicans finally overtook the Democrats in holding majorities in statehouses and governorships.

Currently, majority control of overall seats in the state legislature has been changing every few years. As of the U.S. gubernatorial elections of 2006, the Democratic party holds an outright majority of 669 with 3,989 seats over the Republican party's 3,320 in number of seats elected on a partisan ballot. Of the 7,382 seats in all of the state legislatures combined, independents and third parties account for only 17 members, not counting the 49 members of the Nebraska Legislature, which is the only legislature in the nation to hold non-partisan elections to determine its members.

Contents

Current party strength

State 2008 Presidential Election Governor Upper House Majority Lower House Majority Senior U.S. Senator Junior U.S. Senator U.S. House Delegation Demographics
Alabama Republican Republican Democratic 21-14 Democratic 60-45 Republican Republican Republican 5-2 Republican 48-34
Alaska Republican Republican Coalition(e) 16-4 Republican 22-18 Republican Democratic Republican 1-0 Republican 41-19
Arizona Republican Republican Republican 18-12 Republican 35-25 Republican Republican Democratic 5-3 Republican 41-32
Arkansas Republican Democratic Democratic 27-8 Democratic 72-28 Democratic Democratic Democratic 3-1 Democratic 41-31
California Democratic Republican Democratic 26-13-1(c)[2] Democratic 49-29-1-1(c)[3] Democratic Democratic Democratic 34-19 Democratic 45-30
Colorado Democratic Democratic Democratic 21-14 Democratic 38-27 Democratic Democratic Democratic 5-2 Republican 38-29
Connecticut Democratic Republican Democratic 24-12 Democratic 114-37 Democratic Independent(a) Democratic 5-0 Democratic 38-26
Delaware Democratic Democratic Democratic 15-6 Democratic 24-17 Democratic Democratic Republican 1-0 Democratic 41-32
Florida Democratic Republican Republican 26-14 Republican 75-44-1(c)[4] Democratic Republican Republican 15-9-1(c) Republican 40-36
Georgia Republican Republican Republican 34-22 Republican 105-74-1 Republican Republican Republican 7-6 Republican 44-32
Hawaii Democratic Republican Democratic 23-2 Democratic 45-6 Democratic Democratic Democratic 1-0-1(c) Democratic 40-23
Idaho Republican Republican Republican 28-7 Republican 52-18 Republican Republican Split 1-1 Republican 50-22
Illinois Democratic Democratic Democratic 37-22 Democratic 70-48 Democratic Democratic Democratic 12-7 Democratic 46-31
Indiana Democratic Republican Republican 33-17 Democratic 52-48 Republican Democratic Democratic 5-4 Republican 46-32
Iowa Democratic Democratic Democratic 32-18 Democratic 56-44 Republican Democratic Democratic 3-2 Republican 36-34
Kansas Republican Democratic Republican 31-9 Republican 76-49 Republican Republican Republican 3-1 Republican 50-27
Kentucky Republican Democratic Republican 20-17-1(b) Democratic 65-35 Republican Republican Republican 4-2 Democratic 44-40
Louisiana Republican Republican Democratic 23-16 Democratic 52-50-3 Democratic Republican Republican 6-1 Democratic 42-40
Maine Democratic Democratic Democratic 20-15 Democratic 95-55-1(a) Republican Republican Democratic 2-0 Democratic 36-29
Maryland Democratic Democratic Democratic 33-14 Democratic 104-36-1(b) Democratic Democratic Democratic 7-1 Democratic 50-31
Massachusetts Democratic Democratic Democratic 34-4-2(c)[5][6] Democratic 144-16 Democratic Republican Democratic 10-0 Democratic 41-19
Michigan Democratic Democratic Republican 22-16 Democratic 67-43 Democratic Democratic Democratic 8-7 Democratic 40-33
Minnesota Democratic Republican Democratic 46-21 Democratic 87-47 Democratic Democratic Democratic 5-3 Democratic 46-30
Mississippi Republican Republican Democratic 27-25 Democratic 75-47 Republican Republican Democratic 3-1 Republican 47-38
Missouri Republican Democratic Republican 23-11 Republican 88-74-1(c)[7] Republican Democratic Republican 5-4 Republican 39-37
Montana Republican Democratic Republican 27-23 Democratic 50-50 Democratic Democratic Republican 1-0 Republican 39-32
Nebraska Republican 4 Republican Unicameral legislature(d):
Non-partisan (official)
Republican 32-17 (unofficial)
Democratic Republican Republican 3-0 Republican 51-27
Democratic 1(g)
Nevada Democratic Republican Democratic 12-9 Democratic 28-14 Democratic Republican Democratic 2-1 Republican 40-34
New Hampshire Democratic Democratic Democratic 14-10 Democratic 224-175-1(c)[8] Republican Democratic Democratic 2-0 Democratic 25-22
New Jersey Democratic Republican Democratic 23-17 Democratic 47-33 Democratic Democratic Democratic 8-5 Democratic 41-28
New Mexico Democratic Democratic Democratic 27-15 Democratic 45-25 Democratic Democratic Democratic 3-0 Democratic 41-31
New York Democratic Democratic Democratic 32-30 Democratic 104-42-3(a)-1(c)[9] Democratic Democratic Democratic 26-2-1(c) Democratic 53-20
North Carolina Democratic Democratic Democratic 30-20 Democratic 68-52 Republican Democratic Democratic 8-5 Republican 40-39
North Dakota Republican Republican Republican 26-21 Republican 58-36 Democratic Democratic Democratic 1-0 Republican 38-29
Ohio Democratic Democratic Republican 21-12 Democratic 53-46 Republican Democratic Democratic 10-8 Republican 37-36
Oklahoma Republican Democratic Republican 26-22 Republican 62-39 Republican Republican Republican 4-1 Republican 43-40
Oregon Democratic Democratic Democratic 18-12 Democratic 36-24 Democratic Democratic Democratic 4-1 Democratic 34-32
Pennsylvania Democratic Democratic Republican 30-20 Democratic 104-98-1(c)[10] Democratic Democratic Democratic 11-7-1(c) Democratic 43-38
Rhode Island Democratic Republican Democratic 33-4-1(b) Democratic 69-6 Democratic Democratic Democratic 2-0 Democratic 38-18
South Carolina Republican Republican Republican 27-19 Republican 72-52 Republican Republican Republican 4-2 Republican 44-33
South Dakota Republican Republican Republican 21-14 Republican 46-24 Democratic Republican Democratic 1-0 Republican 47-32
Tennessee Republican Democratic Republican 19-14 Split(f) 50-48-1 Republican Republican Democratic 5-4 Republican 38-34
Texas Republican Republican Republican 19-12 Republican 77-73 Republican Republican Republican 20-12 Republican 45-21
Utah Republican Republican Republican 21-8 Republican 53-22 Republican Republican Republican 2-1 Republican 56-20
Vermont Democratic Republican Democratic 23-7 Democratic 95-48-7(a) Democratic Independent(a) Democratic 1-0 Democratic 29-27
Virginia Democratic Republican Democratic 22-18 Republican 59-39-2(b) Democratic Democratic Democratic 6-5 Republican 39-36
Washington Democratic Democratic Democratic 31-18 Democratic 61-37 Democratic Democratic Democratic 6-3 Democratic 39-29
West Virginia Republican Democratic Democratic 28-6 Democratic 79-21 Democratic Democratic Democratic 2-1 Democratic 51-32
Wisconsin Democratic Democratic Democratic 18-15 Democratic 52-46-1(a) Democratic Democratic Democratic 5-3 Democratic 38-34
Wyoming Republican Democratic Republican 23-7 Republican 41-19 Republican Republican Republican 1-0 Republican 55-28
Totals
President Governor State Upper House Majority State Lower House Majority U.S. Senate U.S. House of Representatives
Democratic 365-173 Democratic 26-24 Democratic 28-21-1(e) Democratic 33-15-1(d) (f) Democratic 57-41-2(a) Democratic 253-178-4(c)[11][12][13][14]

(a) Non-Democrats caucusing with Democratic Party.

(b) Non-Republicans caucusing with Republican Party.

(c) Vacancy.

(d) Nebraska has no lower house.

(e) The Alaska State Senate has a coalition majority of all the senate's Democrats and several Republicans, with the remaining Republicans in the minority.

(f) The Tennessee House of Representatives currently has a speaker who is officially from neither party but was previously in the Republican caucus. The speaker gave committee chairmanships to members of both parties, so neither party has a clear governing majority. Since the leadership vote, Republicans gained a numerical majority even without the current speaker, but the February 2009 leadership vote is binding until 2011.

(g) Obama–Biden won an electoral vote in Nebraska by winning a plurality of the votes in Nebraska's 2nd congressional district.

Regional breakdowns

Local and regional political circumstances often influence party strength.

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State government

Governor
Governors' partisan affiliations.
Upper Lower
Upper House majority Lower House majority

Presidential election results and congressional delegations

Presidential Election
United States Presidential Election 2008.
Senate House of Representatives
Senators' party affiliations delegation by state. Percent of members of the House of Representatives from each party by state.

Demographics

USpercentagesbystate.png

Historical party strength

The following table shows how many state legislatures were controlled outright by each party.

Year Democrats Republicans Split
1938 21 19 6
1940 21 17 8
1942 19 24 3
1944 19 24 3
1946 17 25 4
1948 19 16 11
1950 19 21 6
1952 16 26 4
1954 19 20 7
1956 22 19 5
1958 30 7 11
1960 27 15 6
1962 25 17 6
1964 32 6 10
1966 23 16 9
1968 20 20 8
1970 23 16 9
1972 26 16 7
1974 37 4 8
1976 35 4 10
1978 31 11 7
1980 29 15 5
1982 34 11 4
1984 26 11 12
1986 28 9 12
1988 29 8 12
1990 30 6 13
1992 25 8 16
1994 18 19 12
1996 20 18 11
1998 20 17 12
2000 16 18 15
2002 18 17 14
2003 16 21 12
2004 17 21 11
2005 20 20 9
2007 24 16 9
2008 23 15 12
2009 27 14 9

The following table shows how many governorships were controlled outright by each party.

Year Democrats Republicans Independent
1934 37 9 2
1936 38 7 3
1937 39 6 3
1938 29 19
1940 28 20
1942 24 24
1943 22 26
1944 25 23
1946 23 25
1947 24 24
1948 28 20
1950 22 26
1952 18 30
1953 19 29
1954 27 21
1956 28 20
1958 35 15
1960 34 16
1962 34 16
1964 33 17
1966 25 25
1967 24 26
1968 19 31
1969 18 32
1970 29 21
1971 30 20
1972 31 19
1973 32 18
1974 36 13 1
1976 37 12 1
1978 32 18
1979 31 19
1980 27 23
1982 34 16
1983 35 15
1984 34 16
1986 26 24
1988 28 22
1989 29 21
1990 28 20 2
1992 30 18 2
1993 29 19 2
1994 19 30 1
1995 18 31 1
1996 17 32 1
1998 17 31 2
1999 18 30 2
2000 19 29 2
2001 21 27 2
2002 24 26
2004 22 28
2006 28 22
2008 29 21
2009 26 24

References

  1. ^ "Neuhart, P. (22 January, 2004). Why politics is fun from catbirds' seats. USA Today.". http://www.usatoday.com/news/opinion/columnist/neuharth/2004-01-22-neuharth_x.htm. Retrieved 2007-07-11. 
  2. ^ "Special election scheduled to fill Benoit's Senate seat"
  3. ^ "Special election for Paul Krekorian's Valley-area Assembly seat set for April 13"
  4. ^ "Starting now: A fast-paced race to replace Ray Sansom"
  5. ^ "Election Set To Replace Jailed Sen. Galluccio"
  6. ^ "Special election dates set for Scott Brown's state senate seat"
  7. ^ "Rep. Brian Yates to resign, work for payday lending firm"
  8. ^ "Boutin wins District 16 special election"
  9. ^ "Peralta Wins State Senate Seat In Queens Special Election"
  10. ^ "House vacancy to be filled during 2010 primary"
  11. ^ "State Sen. Deutch wins in Wexler's district"
  12. ^ "Special election to fill Murtha's term set for primary day"
  13. ^ "Abercrombie resigns post"
  14. ^ "Paterson likely to hold special election, sources say"

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