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PolyGram Filmed Entertainment
PolyGram Pictures, Inc.
PolyGram Filmed Entertainment, Inc.
PolyGram Film Productions, B.V.
Type Corporation
Founded May 8, 1979
Founder(s) Philips
Headquarters Universal City, Los Angeles, California & London England
Owner(s) Philips (1979-1999)
Universal Studios (1999)
Divisions Working Title Films
Interscope Communications
Propaganda Films
Gramercy Pictures
PolyGram Television

PolyGram Filmed Entertainment (PFE) (aka PolyGram Films and PolyGram Pictures) was a London-based Anglo-Dutch film studio, founded in 1979 as a European competitor to Hollywood, but eventually sold and merged with Universal Pictures in 1999.

Among its most successful films were Four Weddings and a Funeral (1994), Fargo (1996), Trainspotting (1996) and What Dreams May Come (1998).

Contents

History

The Dutch music company PolyGram (owned by Philips) created PFE in 1979 to consolidate its existing film companies. It invested US$200 million with the intention of developing a European film studio that could produce and distribute films internationally on a scale to match the major Hollywood studios.

Following the style of its music business, the company produced films through a number of creatively semi-autonomous 'labels', such as Working Title Films in the UK and Propaganda Films and Interscope Communications in the United States – It also built up its own network of distribution companies.

Film production within Polygram differed from traditional Hollywood studios, in that power to make ('green light') a film was not centralised in the hands of a small number of executives, but instead was decided by negotiations between producers, management and marketing. PFE President, Michael Kuhn, claimed that "movies sort of green lit themselves."

The company was based in the United Kingdom, and invested heavily in British film making — some credit it with reviving the British film industry in the 1990s. Despite a successful production history, Philips decided to sell PFE to the beverage (liquor) conglomerate Seagram in 1999.

PFE's assets were merged into Seagram's existing film studio, Universal Pictures. Most of its library of films produced up until 1996 is now controlled by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. Universal owns the rest of the post-1996 films and the library from 1996 to 1999 including PolyGram Television.

PolyGram Filmed Entertainment took over the distribution of Manga Entertainment's titles in Australia and New Zealand in late 1996 after Siren Entertainment's license to the Manga Video catalogue expired, but PolyGram lost the license to the Manga Video catalogue in 1998 after Madman Entertainment took over the licenses. This was due to Manga Entertainment being moved from Island Records to Palm Pictures.

Production companies

Distribution company

In 1992, PolyGram partnered with Universal Pictures to create a joint venture called Gramercy Pictures. Gramercy primarily distributed PolyGram films in the USA. After PolyGram's absorbing into Universal in 1999, Gramercy merged with October Films to form USA Films, which eventually became Focus Features.

Selected films

Among the films directly produced by PFE were:

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Working Title Films

Propaganda (Gold Circle Films)

Interscope (Saturn Films)

Gramercy

Manga Entertainment

See also

References

  • Michael Kuhn, One Hundred Films and a Funeral: The Life and Death of Polygram Films, Thorogood, 2002. ISBN 1-85418-216-1.

PolyGram Filmed Entertainment
PolyGram Pictures, Inc.
PolyGram Filmed Entertainment, Inc.
PolyGram Film Productions, B.V.
Type Corporation
Founded May 8, 1979
Founder(s) Philips
Headquarters Universal City, Los Angeles, California & London, England
Owner(s) Philips (1979-1999)
Universal Studios (1999)
Divisions Working Title Films
Interscope Communications
Propaganda Films
Gramercy Pictures
PolyGram Television

PolyGram Filmed Entertainment (PFE) (aka PolyGram Films and PolyGram Pictures) was a London-based Anglo-Dutch-American film studio, founded in 1979 as a European competitor to Hollywood, but eventually sold and merged with Universal Pictures in 1999.

Among its most successful films were Four Weddings and a Funeral (1994), Dead Man Walking (1995), Fargo (1996), Trainspotting (1996) and What Dreams May Come (1998).

Contents

History

The Dutch music company PolyGram (owned by Philips) created PFE in 1979 to consolidate its existing film companies. It invested US$200 million with the intention of developing a European film studio that could produce and distribute films internationally on a scale to match the major Hollywood studios.

Following the style of its music business, the company produced films through a number of creatively semi-autonomous 'labels', such as Working Title Films in the UK and Propaganda Films and Interscope Communications in the United States – It also built up its own network of distribution companies.

Film production within Polygram differed from traditional Hollywood studios, in that power to make ('green light') a film was not centralised in the hands of a small number of executives, but instead was decided by negotiations between producers, management and marketing. PFE President, Michael Kuhn, claimed that "movies sort of green lit themselves."

The company was based in the United Kingdom, and invested heavily in British film making — some credit it with reviving the British film industry in the 1990s. Despite a successful production history, Philips decided to sell PFE to the beverage (liquor) conglomerate Seagram in 1999.

PFE's assets were merged into Seagram's existing film studio, Universal Pictures. Most of its library of films produced up until 1996 is now controlled by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. Universal owns the rest of the pre-1996 films (such as Dazed and Confused) and the library from 1996 to 1999 including PolyGram Television.

PolyGram Filmed Entertainment took over the distribution of Manga Entertainment's titles in Australia and New Zealand in late 1996 after Siren Entertainment's license to the Manga Video catalogue expired, but PolyGram lost the license to the Manga Video catalogue in 1998 after Madman Entertainment took over the licenses. This was due to Manga Entertainment being moved from Island Records to Palm Pictures.

Production companies

Distribution company

In 1992, PolyGram partnered with Universal Pictures to create a joint venture called Gramercy Pictures. Gramercy primarily distributed PolyGram films in the USA. After PolyGram's absorbing into Universal in 1999, Gramercy merged with October Films to form USA Films, which eventually became Focus Features.

Selected films

Among the films directly produced by PFE were:

Working Title Films

Propaganda (Gold Circle Films)

Interscope (Saturn Films)

Gramercy Pictures

Manga Entertainment

See also

References

  • Michael Kuhn, One Hundred Films and a Funeral: The Life and Death of Polygram Films, Thorogood, 2002. ISBN 1-85418-216-1.


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