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Pope Adeodatus I: Wikis

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Adeodatus I
StAdeodatus I.jpg
Papacy began November 13, 615
Papacy ended November 8, 618
Predecessor Boniface IV
Successor Boniface V
Personal details
Birth name Deusdedit, son of Stephen
Born ???
Rome, Byzantine Empire
Died November 8, 618
Rome, Byzantine Empire
Papal styles of
Pope Adeodatus I

Emblem of the Papacy SE.svg

Reference style His Holiness
Spoken style Your Holiness
Religious style Holy Father
Posthumous style Saint

Pope Saint Adeodatus I or Deodatus I (which is Given by God in Latin, also called Deusdedit, which is God Has Given; both are now considered variants of the same name) (died November 8, 618) was pope from 615 to 618.

He was born in Rome, the son of a subdeacon. According to tradition, he was the first pope to use lead seals (bullae) on papal documents, which in time came to be called "papal bulls".

He is the first priest to be elected pope since John II in 533. He was a priest for 40 years prior and represents the second wave of anti-Gregorian challenge to the papacy, the first being that of Sabinian. He reversed the practice of his predecessor, Boniface IV, of filling the papal administrative ranks with monks by recalling the clergy to such positions and by ordaining some 14 priests (the first ordinations in Rome since Pope Saint Gregory).

He was appointed Pope 13 November 615, and was distinguished for his charity and zeal. He encouraged and supported the clergy, who were impoverished in consequence of the political troubles of the time; and when his diocese was visited by a violent earthquake and leprosy he set an heroic example by his efforts to relieve the suffering. One bulla dating from his reign is still preserved, the obverse of which represents the Good Shepherd in the midst of His sheep, with the letters Alpha and Omega underneath, while the reverse bears the inscription: Deusdedit Papæ. His feast occurs 8 November.

References

Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Boniface IV
Pope
615–618
Succeeded by
Boniface V
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