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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Seaport, a 17th Century depiction by Claude Lorrain, 1638
The Port of Dover, UK.
The port of Piraeus in Greece
Visakhapatnam Port, Andhra Pradesh, India.
Port of Kobe, Japan at twilight
Port Newark, seen across Newark Bay

A port is a location on a coast or shore containing one or more harbors where ships can dock and transfer people or cargo to or from land. Port locations are selected to optimize access to land and navigable water, for commercial demand, and for shelter from wind and waves. Ports with deeper water are rarer, but can handle larger, more economical ships. Since ports throughout history handled every kind of traffic, support and storage facilities vary widely, may extend for miles, and dominate the local economy. Some ports have an important, perhaps exclusively military role.

Contents

Distribution

Ports often have cargo-handling equipment, such as cranes (operated by longshoremen) and forklifts for use in loading ships, which may be provided by private interests or public bodies. Often, canneries or other processing facilities will be located nearby. Some ports feature canals, which allow ships further movement inland. Access to intermodal transportation, such as trains and trucks, are critical to a port, so that passengers and cargo can also move further inland beyond the port area. Ports with international traffic have customs facilities. Harbour pilots and tugboats may maneuver large ships in tight quarters when near docks.

Port types

The terms "port" and "seaport" are used for different types of port facilities that handle ocean-going vessels, and river port is used for river traffic, such as barges and other shallow-draft vessels. Some ports on a lake, river, or canal have access to a sea or ocean, and are sometimes called "inland ports".

A fishing port is a port or harbor facility for landing and distributing fish. It may be a recreational facility, but it is usually commercial. A fishing port is the only port that depends on an ocean product, and depletion of fish may cause a fishing port to be uneconomical. In recent decades, regulations to save fishing stock may limit the use of a fishing port, perhaps effectively closing it.

A "dry port" is a term sometimes used to describe a yard used to place containers or conventional bulk cargo, usually connected to a seaport by rail or road.

A warm water port is where the water does not freeze in winter time. Because they are available year-round, warm water ports can be of great geopolitical or economic interest.

A seaport is further categorized as a "cruise port" or a "cargo port". Additionally, "cruise ports" are also known as a "home port" or a "port of call". The "cargo port" is also further categorized into a "bulk" or "break bulk port" or as a "container port".

A cruise home port is the port where cruise-ship passengers board (or embark) to start their cruise and also debark (or disembark) the cruise ship at the end of their cruise. It is also where the cruise ship's supplies are loaded for the cruise, which includes everything from fresh water and fuel to fruits, vegetable, champagne, and any other supplies needed for the cruise. "Cruise home ports" are a very busy place during the day the cruise ship is in port, because off-going passengers debark their baggage and on-coming passengers board the ship in addition to all the supplies being loaded. Currently, the Cruise Capital of the World is the Port of Miami, Florida, closely followed behind by Port Everglades, Florida and the Port of San Juan, Puerto Rico.

A port of call is an intermediate stop for a ship on its sailing itinerary, which may include up to half a dozen ports. At these ports, a cargo ship may take on supplies or fuel, as well as unloading and loading cargo. But for a cruise ship, it is their premier stop where the cruise lines take on passengers to enjoy their vacation.

Cargo ports, on the other hand, are quite different from cruise ports, because each handles very different cargo, which has to be loaded and unloaded by very different mechanical means. The port may handle one particular type of cargo or it may handle numerous cargoes, such as grains, liquid fuels, liquid chemicals, wood, automobiles, etc. Such ports are known as the "bulk" or "break bulk ports". Those ports that handle containerized cargo are known as container ports. Most cargo ports handle all sorts of cargo, but some ports are very specific as to what cargo they handle. Additionally, the individual cargo ports are divided into different operating terminals which handle the different cargoes, and are operated by different companies, also known as terminal operators or stevedores.

Access

Ports sometimes fall out of use. Rye, East Sussex was an important English port in the Middle Ages, but the coastline changed and it is now 2 miles (3.2 km) from the sea, while the ports of Ravenspurn and Dunwich have been lost to coastal erosion. Also in the United Kingdom, London, the River Thames was once an important international port, but changes in shipping methods, such as the use of containers and larger ships, put it at a disadvantage.

Ports of the World

Africa

Asia

For details on East Asian ports, see the List of East Asian ports.

North America

The ports of the United States handle more than 2 billion metric tons of domestic and import/export cargo annually. American ports are responsible for moving over 99 percent of the country's overseas cargo.

For details on U.S. Ports, see the List of ports in the United States. For details on all North American ports, see the List of North American ports.

See also

Water port topics

Other types of ports

Lists

External links


1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

PORT. (1) (From the Lat. portus, harbour), a place to which ships may resort for the unloading or taking in of cargo, or for shelter, a harbour, also a town possessing such a harbour, a "seaport," or "seaport town," especially one where customhouse officers are stationed. As the name of a dark red Portuguese wine, the word is a shortened form of Oporto, i.e. the port, the chief centre of the wine-shipping trade of Portugal (see Wine). (2) (Through the Fr. Porte, from Lat. porta, gate), an entrance or opening, not often used in the sense of gate, except in such compounds as "sallyport," cf. "portcullis," and in the derivative "porter," a keeper of a door or gate, especially of a public building, hotel, college, &c. The most general use of the word is for an opening for the admission of light and air in a ship's side, and formerly in ships of war for an embrasure for cannon, a "port-hole." For the application of the word to the left side of a ship, taking the place of the earlier "larboard," and its disputed origin, see Starboard And Larboard. (3) (Through the Fr. porter, from Lat. portare, to carry, bear), properly outward bearing or deportment, whence "portly," originally of dignified or majestic bearing, now chiefly used in the sense of stout or corpulent. The verb "to port" is only used as a military term "to port arms," i.e. to hold the rifle across and close to the body, the barrel being placed opposite to the left shoulder. Derivatives are "port-fire" (Fr. porte feu), a fuse for firing rockets, &c., and formerly for the discharge of artillery, and "porter," i.e. one who carries a burden, particularly a servant of a railway company, hotel, &c., who carries passengers' luggage to and from a station, &c. The term "porter" has been applied, since the 18th century, to a particular form of beer, dark brown or almost black in colour (see Beer and Brewing). The finer kinds of this beer are generally now known as "stout." The name is almost certainly due to the fact that it was from the first a favourite drink among the London "porters," the street carriers of goods, luggage, &c., and in early uses the drink is called porter's ale, porter's beer, or porter-beer.


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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010
(Redirected to port article)

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

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Wikipedia

Contents

English

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

Old English port, from Latin portus (port, harbour).

Noun

Singular
port

Plural
ports

port (plural ports)

Wikipedia

  1. A place on the coast at which ships can shelter, or dock to load and unload cargo or passengers.
  2. A town or city containing such a place.
  3. (nautical, uncountable) The left-hand side of a vessel when one is facing the front.
Synonyms
  • (place where ships dock): harbour, haven
  • (town or city containing such a place): harbour city, harbour town
  • (left-hand side of a vessel): larboard, left
Antonyms
Derived terms
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Adjective

port (not comparable)

Positive
port

Comparative
not comparable

Superlative
none (absolute)

  1. (nautical) Of or relating to port, the left-hand side of a vessel.
    on the port side
Synonyms
Antonyms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Latin porta (passage, gate), reinforced in Middle English from Old French porte.

Noun

Singular
port

Plural
ports

port (plural ports)

  1. (obsolete, except Scots) An entryway or gate; a portal.
    Him I accuse/The city ports by this hath enter'dShakespeare, Coriolanus (1623), V.vi.
    And from their ivory port the Cherubim,/Forth issuing at the accustomed hour,Milton, Paradise Lost (1667), book IV
  2. An opening or doorway in the side of a ship, especially for boarding or loading; an embrasure through which a cannon may be discharged; a porthole.
    ...her ports being within sixteen inches of the water...Sir W. Raleigh
  3. (curling, bowls) A space between two stones wide enough for a delivered stone or bowl to pass through.
  4. An opening where a connection (such as a pipe) is made.
  5. (computing) A logical or physical construct in and from which data are transferred. Wikipedia-logo.png Computer port (hardware) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia:Computer port (hardware)
  6. (computing) A female connector of an electronic device, into which a cable's male connector can be inserted.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 3

From Old French porter < Latin portare (carry). Akin to transport, portable.

Verb

Infinitive
to port

Third person singular
ports

Simple past
ported

Past participle
ported

Present participle
porting

to port (third-person singular simple present ports, present participle porting, simple past and past participle ported)

  1. (obsolete) To carry, bear, or transport. See porter.
    They are easily ported by boat into other shires.Fuller, The History of the Worthies of England
  2. (military) To hold or carry (a weapon) with both hands so that it lays diagonally across the front of the body, with the barrel or similar part near the left shoulder and the right hand grasping the small of the stock; or, to throw (the weapon) into this position on command.
    Port arms!
    ...the angelic squadron...began to hem him round with ported spears.Milton, Paradise Lost (1667), book IV
  3. (computing, video games) To adapt, modify, or create a new version of, a program so that it works on a different platform; to adapt a console video game title to be sold and played on another brand of console. Wikipedia-logo.png Porting (computing) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia:Porting
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

Singular
port

Plural
ports

port (plural ports)

  1. Something used to carry a thing, especially a frame for wicks in candle-making.
  2. (dated) The manner in which a person carries himself; bearing; deportment; carriage. See also portance.
    And of his port as meeke as is a mayde.Chaucer, Canterbury Tales, line 69
    ..the necessities of pomp, grandeur, and a suitable port in the world.Robert South
  3. (military) The position of a weapon when ported; a rifle position executed by throwing the weapon diagonally across the front of the body, with the right hand grasping the small of the stock and the barrel sloping upward and crossing the point of the left shoulder.
  4. (computing) A program that has been adapted, modified, or recoded so that it works on a different platform from the one for which it was created; the act of this adapting.
    Gamers can't wait until a port of the title is released on the new system.
    The latest port of the database software is the worst since we made the changeover.
  5. (computing) (FreeBSD) A set of files used to build and install a binary executable file from the source code of an application.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 4

Named from Oporto, a city in Portugal from whence the wines were originally shipped.

Noun

Singular
port

Plural
ports

port (plural ports)

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Wikipedia

  1. A type of very sweet fortified wine, mostly dark red, traditionally made in Portugal.
Synonyms
Translations

Etymology 5

Abbreviation of portmanteau.

Noun

Singular
port

Plural
ports

port (plural ports)

  1. (Australian, colloquial) A schoolbag or suitcase.

Danish

Etymology

From late Old Norse port n., portr m., from Latin porta f..

Pronunciation

  • IPA: /port/, [pʰoɐ̯ˀd̥]

Noun

port c. (singular definite porten, plural indefinite porte)

  1. gate
  2. gateway

Inflection


Dutch

Noun

port n.

  1. postage

Noun

port m.

  1. port, port wine, porto

French

Pronunciation

Noun

port m.

  1. port, harbour
  2. port, harbour city
  3. refuge
  4. act of wearing, act of carrying (from the verb porter (to wear or carry))
  5. transport
  6. postage
  7. stature, way of carrying oneself

Anagrams

  • Anagrams of oprt
  • trop

Norwegian

From late Old Norse port n., portr m., from Latin porta f..

Noun

port m. (definite singular porten; indefinite plural porter; definite plural portene)

  1. gate
  2. (computing) A logical or physical construct in and from which data are transferred.
  3. (computing) A female connector of an electronic device, into which a cable's male connector can be inserted.

Old English

Etymology

Latin portus

Noun

port m. and n.

  1. port (for watercraft)

Old French

Etymology

Latin portus

Noun

port m. (oblique plural porz, nominative singular porz, nominative plural port)

  1. port (for watercraft)

Polish

port

Noun

port m.

  1. port, harbour (area for ships)
  2. port, a town or city containing such a place

Declension

Singular Plural
Nominative port porty
Genitive portu portów
Dative portowi portom
Accusative port porty
Instrumental portem portami
Locative porcie portach
Vocative porcie porty

Derived terms

  • portowy

Swedish

Etymology

From late Old Norse port n., portr m., from Latin porta f.. Computing sense loan-translation from English.

Pronunciation

Noun

Inflection for port Singular Plural
common Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Base form port porten portar portarna
Possessive form ports portens portars portarnas

port c.

  1. entrance (into a building), gate, portal
  2. (computing) port (logical or physical construct in and from which data are transferred)

See also

  • portvin
  • portvakt
  • portkod
  • porta

Gaming

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From Wikia Gaming, your source for walkthroughs, games, guides, and more!

In the game industry, shortened form of the word 'transport', that is when a game is transported from one platform to another.

As opposed to a remake which often involves adding many features or redesigning a game from a basic level, a port is a version of a game which, aside from its new platform and minor performance and bug issues which may arise as a result is virtually identical to the original. Usually made distinct from a simultaneous release, especially when a game's financial success is what allows or motivates it to be ported.

Examples of Ports


This article uses material from the "Port" article on the Gaming wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Simple English

A port can mean different things:

]]

  • A port is a place at the edge of an ocean, river, or lake for ships to load and unload their cargo. Persons on ships can get on or off ships at a port. It is also called a harbour or harbor. This kind of port is the same as sea port.
  • An airport is never called a port, even though it does the same thing as a sea port.
  • Port wine is sometimes just called Port. It is a special kind of wine that is made in Oporto in Portugal.
  • In electronics, a port is a part of a piece of equipment where other things can be connected to it. For example, a USB port







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