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Port Elizabeth
Ibhayi (Xhosa)
Aerial view of Port Elizabeth
Nickname(s): The Friendly City or The Windy City
Port Elizabeth is located in South Africa
Port Elizabeth
Location in South Africa
Coordinates: 33°57′29″S 25°36′00″E / 33.95806°S 25.6°E / -33.95806; 25.6Coordinates: 33°57′29″S 25°36′00″E / 33.95806°S 25.6°E / -33.95806; 25.6
Country South Africa
Province Eastern Cape
Metropolitan Municipality Nelson Mandela Bay
Founded 1820
Incorporated (Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality) 2001
Government
 - Executive Mayor Nondumiso Maphazi
 - Municipal Manager Graham Richards
Area
 - City 1,845 km2 (712.4 sq mi)
 - Metro 1,845 km2 (712.4 sq mi)
Population (2005)
 Urban 737,600
 Metro 1,244,900
 - Metro Density 813/km2 (2,106/sq mi)
Time zone SAST (UTC+2)
Area code(s) 041
Website http://www.mandelametro.gov.za/

Port Elizabeth (Xhosa: Ebhayi; colloquial Afrikaans: 'Die Baai') is one of the largest cities in South Africa, situated in the Eastern Cape Province, 770 km east of Cape Town. The city, often shortened to PE and nicknamed "The Friendly City" or "The Windy City", stretches for 16 km along Algoa Bay, and is one of the major seaports in South Africa. It is also referred to as Africa's Watersport Capital.

Port Elizabeth was founded as a town in 1820 to house British settlers as a way of strengthening the border region between the Cape Colony and the Xhosa. It now forms part of the Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality which has a population of over 1.3 million.

The city is in a friendship partnership with the Swedish city of Gothenburg and is a sister city to the American cities of Jacksonville, Florida and Palm Desert, California.

Contents

History

The area around what is now called Algoa Bay was first settled by indigenous tribes countless centuries ago. It is said that the San and Khoisan people were amongst the first inhabitants, and the Xhosa came later. However, little is known as no written records are believed to exist from that time.

The first Europeans to have visited the area were Portuguese explorers Bartolomeu Dias, who landed on St Croix Island in Algoa Bay in 1488[1], and Vasco da Gama who noted the nearby Bird Island in 1497. For centuries, the area was simply marked on navigation charts as "a landing place with fresh water". [2]

The area was part of the Cape Colony, which had a turbulent history between its founding by the Dutch East India Company in 1652 and the formation of the Union of South Africa in 1910.

Fort Frederick

In 1799, during the first British occupation of the Colony during the Napoleonic Wars, a stone Fort was built, named Fort Frederick after the then Duke of York. This fort, built to protect against a possible landing of French Troops, overlooked the site of what later became Port Elizabeth and is now a monument.[2]

In 1804 the town of Uitenhage was founded[3] along the Swartkops River, a short distance inland from its estuary at Algoa Bay. Uitenhage formed part of the district of Graaff-Reinet at that time. The city of Uitenhage was incorporated in the new Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Municipality together with Port Elizabeth and the town of Despatch in 2001.

From 1814 to 1821 the Strandfontein farm, which later became the Summerstrand beach suburb of Port Elizabeth, was in possession of Piet Retief, who later became a Voortrekker leader and was killed in 1837 by Zulu king Dingane during negotiations about land. An estimated 500 men, woman and children of his party were massacred. After Retief the Strandfontein farm was owned by Frederik Korsten after whom another suburb of Port Elizabeth is named today.

In 1820 a party of 4,000 British settlers arrived by sea, encouraged by the government of the Cape Colony as a settlement would strengthen the border region between the Cape Colony and the Xhosa people. At this time the seaport town was founded by Sir Rufane Shaw Donkin, the Acting Governor of the Cape Colony, who named it after his late wife, Elizabeth. The town expanded, building a diverse community comprising European, Cape Malay and other immigrants, and particularly rapidly so after 1873 when the railway to Kimberley was built [4]. The Apostolic Vicariate of Cape of Good Hope, Eastern District, was established in the city in 1847. In 1861 the town was granted the status of autonomous municipality.

Horse Memorial

During the Second Boer War, the port was an important transit point for soldiers, horses and materials headed to the front by railway. While the city itself did not see any conflict, many refugees from the war moved into the city. These included Boer women and children interned by the British in a concentration camp. Following that war, the Horse Memorial was erected to honour the tens of thousands of horses and mules that died during the conflict.

Apartheid era

The effects of the apartheid regime were not lost on Port Elizabeth. Forced relocation of the non-white population under the Group Areas Act began in 1962, causing various townships to be built. The whole of the South End district, being a prime real estate location, was forcibly depopulated and flattened in 1965; relocations continued until 1975.[2] In 1977 Steve Biko, the black anti-apartheid activist, was interrogated and tortured by the security police in PE, before being transported to Pretoria where he died. [5] Other notable deaths in the city during this time included the Cradock Four.

During the 1960s and 1970s the character of Port Elizabeth was changed and its face marred by two projects. The university was removed from the historical and picturesque old part of Port Elizabeth on a hill overlooking the city centre and harbour to a sandy area on the outskirts of town. The campus in town was completely inadequate. Since this removal, the old centre of Port Elizabeth has seen a slow decline. This decline was augmented by a second project, namely the building of a series of highways, viaducts and interchanges directly along the coast and over the roof of the central station thereby severing the old town from the station and harbour, destroying much of its history, integrity, allure and safety. The same system of highways also added to the damage already done by industries to the beautiful and fragile wetland area of the Swartkops estuary, one of Port Elizabeth's main natural assets.

Post apartheid

Population density in Port Elizabeth
     <1 /km²      1–3 /km²      3–10 /km²      10–30 /km²      30–100 /km²      100–300 /km²      300–1000 /km²      1000–3000 /km²      >3000 /km²
Geographical distribution of home languages in Port Elizabeth
     Afrikaans      English      Xhosa      None dominant

Since the multiracial elections of 1994, Port Elizabeth has faced the same problems as the rest of South Africa, including HIV/AIDS and a surge in violent, often drug-related, crime. However, thanks to the booming tourism and real estate industries, development continues apace both in the city and nearby, for example in the new R20Billion Industrial Development Zone at Coega.

In 2001, the Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality was formed as an administrative area covering Port Elizabeth, the neighbouring towns of Uitenhage and Despatch and the surrounding agricultural areas. The name was chosen to honour former President Nelson Mandela. The combined metropolitan area has a population estimated at around 1.3 million as of 2006.

2010 FIFA World Cup

The Port Elizabeth harbour, waterfront and city centre are in the process of being upgraded before the 2010 FIFA World Cup, and are expected to rival the popular Cape Town waterfront. The city is one of the venues for World Cup games, and many more visitors are expected. To this end, there are calls for Port Elizabeth Airport to be upgraded, to ease the journey time and effort both for World Cup teams and spectators, and also more generally for tourists.[citation needed]

Trade and industry

Home of South Africa's motor vehicle industry, Port Elizabeth boasts most vehicle assembly plants, General Motors, Volkswagen, Ford, Continental Tyres and many more automotive companies. Most other industries in the NMMM are geared towards the motor vehicle industry, providing parts such as wiring harnesses, catalytic converters, batteries and tyres to the vehicle manufacturers.

Port Elizabeth is also a major seaport, with the most significant ore loading facilities in the southern hemisphere. As part of the ongoing development, a new Industrial Development Zone with expanded port facilities is being built at Coega.

Transport

Road

Port Elizabeth lies on the N2 road. To the west the road travels the picturesque Garden Route to George and Cape Town; to the east, the road runs through the so-called Border Country through Grahamstown, to East London then on to Durban, finally terminating in Ermelo in Mpumalanga. Regional roads also connect PE with the Transkei.

The city's main bus station is in Market Square. The public bus service is run by The Algoa Bus Company.

The city is in the proccess of building a bus rapid transport system for the 2010 FIFA world cup.

Railway

Port Elizabeth railway station is served by South Africa's rail network. Local commuter services are operated by Metrorail, while the Shosholoza Meyl long-distance passenger service links PE with Johannesburg via Bloemfontein where it is possible to connect with other long-distance routes. [6]

The Apple Express narrow-gauge tourist train to Avontuur operates from the separate station in Humewood Road near King's Beach. It departs regularly for Thornhill Village via Van Stadens River bridge, the highest narrow-gauge rail bridge in the world.

Air

Port Elizabeth Airport (IATA airport code PLZ, ICAO airport code FAPE) serves the city for both passenger and cargo traffic. It is the fourth busiest airport in South Africa after Johannesburg International, Durban International and Cape Town International.

International visitors to the city must currently fly to either Johannesburg or Cape Town and then take a domestic flight to Port Elizabeth. An upgrade to the terminal building, completed in 2004, created the necessary facilities to handle international flights [7] although none are scheduled as yet.

In preparation for the 2010 FIFA World Cup the runway is being extended with a view to accommodating international flights[citation needed].

The general aviation sector is well represented in PE, with a number of facilities on-field able to provide aircraft charter and rental, handling, maintenance and training to commercial level. There are also a few smaller airfields in the vicinity. Port Elizabeth has one of the best flight schools in Africa.

Sea

Port Elizabeth has a harbour in Algoa Bay, and construction of a second seaport is underway. The newer international harbour at Coega will support an increase in the size of the city's industries and the addition of new industries.

Geography and climate

Port Elizabeth
Climate chart (explanation)
J F M A M J J A S O N D
 
 
36
 
25
18
 
 
40
 
25
18
 
 
54
 
25
17
 
 
58
 
23
14
 
 
59
 
22
12
 
 
62
 
20
9
 
 
47
 
20
9
 
 
64
 
20
10
 
 
62
 
20
11
 
 
59
 
21
13
 
 
49
 
22
15
 
 
34
 
24
16
average max. and min. temperatures in °C
precipitation totals in mm
source: SAWS[8]

"The Windy City" has a subtropical climate with light rain throughout the year. The area lies between the winter rainfall, Mediterranean climate zones of the Western Cape and the summer rainfall regions of eastern South Africa. Winters are cool but mild and summers are warm but considerably less humid and hot than more northerly parts of South Africa's east coast.[9]

Climate data for Port Elizabeth
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 39
(102)
38
(100)
41
(106)
39
(102)
35
(95)
32
(90)
33
(91)
34
(93)
39
(102)
39
(102)
36
(97)
36
(97)
41
(106)
Average high °C (°F) 25
(77)
25
(77)
25
(77)
23
(73)
22
(72)
20
(68)
20
(68)
20
(68)
20
(68)
21
(70)
22
(72)
24
(75)
22
(72)
Average low °C (°F) 18
(64)
18
(64)
17
(63)
14
(57)
12
(54)
9
(48)
9
(48)
10
(50)
11
(52)
13
(55)
14
(57)
16
(61)
14
(57)
Record low °C (°F) 10
(50)
11
(52)
8
(46)
4
(39)
2
(36)
-1
(30)
-1
(30)
2
(36)
2
(36)
3
(37)
6
(43)
9
(48)
-1
(30)
Precipitation mm (inches) 36
(1.42)
40
(1.57)
54
(2.13)
58
(2.28)
59
(2.32)
62
(2.44)
47
(1.85)
64
(2.52)
62
(2.44)
59
(2.32)
49
(1.93)
34
(1.34)
624
(24.57)
Avg. precipitation days 9 9 10 9 9 8 8 10 9 11 11 9 112
Source: South African Weather Service[8] 6 March 2010

Sport

The city has a wealth of fine sporting facilities, catering for cricket, rugby union, association football, field hockey and many other sports. Its coastal location also makes it a base for many watersports.

Port Elizabeth is the location of the St George’s Park cricket ground, which holds test cricket matches. St George's Park is also the oldest cricket ground in South Africa. The Warriors, a top Cricket Team in South Africa, is based in Port Elizabeth.

The headquarters of the controversial Southern Spears rugby franchise was in Port Elizabeth. The long-standing Eastern Province Rugby Union, now usually known as the Mighty Elephants , has been based in the city's EPRU Stadium and would form the basis of the Spears franchise together with East London's Border Bulldogs.

The city is also home to National First Division club Bay United, they currently play their home games at the EPRU Stadium. The new FIFA World Cup stadium, Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium, has also been built in the city.

The Algoa Bay Yacht Club operated out of Port Elizabeth harbour.

Tourism

The Donkin Reserve

Located at the end of the picturesque Garden Route along the Cape coast, the city is one of South Africa's major destinations for tourists, many of whom come simply to enjoy the many fine beaches in and near the city.

The area surrounding the CBD has a number of historic attractions, many of which are linked by the Donkin Heritage Trail. These include the Campanile (bell tower), built in 1923 to commemorate the arrival of the 1820 Settlers and offering a great viewpoint over the city; the city hall (1862); the Donkin Reserve park and monument; and the old stone Fort Frederick itself (1799). The CBD also boasts the towering Eastern Cape post office headquarters.

Other attractions include the gardens at St George's Park, the King George VI Art Gallery, the museum and oceanography room at Humewood, and the new Boardwalk waterfront complex.

The wider area surrounding PE also features a number of game viewing opportunities, including the famous Addo Elephant Park, 72 km to the north near the Zuurberg mountain range and National Park.

Port Elizabeth is known commonly as the watersports capital of South Africa and boasts an ever increasing number of watersports events annually. Algoa bay is home to scuba diving, game fishing charters, surfing, windsurfing, kiteboarding to name but a few. There are many cruises offered from the harbour from sunset cruises to view dolphins to whale watching tours.

Education

The Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University (NMMU) was formed in 2005 by the amalgamation of the University of Port Elizabeth, Vista University and the Port Elizabeth Technikon. It is the largest university in the Eastern and Southern Cape, with around 24,000 students in seven faculties spread over eight campuses. It is the 9th best university in Africa. It was ranked as having one of the most excellent business schools in South Africa, and has one of the top accounting schools in Africa. It boasts a towering 21-storey main administration building, overlooking the Indian Ocean. It is a clean, modern campus, with all facilities any modern university can ask for.

Herbert Hurd Primary School is a co-educational primary school in Newton Park, Port Elizabeth. The school caters to English-speaking pupils from grades 17. The school is named after Herbert Hurd, a member of the P.E. School board. Hurd donated the land to the education authorities to build the school. The school was officially opened in January 1954. The first principal was Martin Emmerick.[10]

As well as government-funded schools, PE and the surrounding area also offer a number of private schooling opportunities, including Grey High School, which is one of the top schools in Africa.[11]

Government

Port Elizabeth forms part of the Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality, and serves as the seat for the surrounding Cacadu District Municipality. Port Elizabeth is a seat of the Eastern Cape High Court, as well as a Magistrate's Court. As a result of the presence of a High Court, several other related organs of state such as a Masters Office and a Director of Public Prosecutions are present in the city. A few other Government (mostly provincial) departments maintain branches or other offices in Port Elizabeth.

Famous people

References

See also

External links


Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikitravel

PE Beaches
PE Beaches

Port Elizabeth [1] (or just PE if you want to sound South African) is South Africa's fifth largest city and is located on the Indian Ocean coast half-way between Cape Town and Durban, in the Eastern Cape, about 260 km from Knysna. Also known as the friendly city and the windy city, it tends to live up to both names.

Image:FIFA2010Host.png
Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium


World Cup 2010
FIFA South Africa 2010

Understand

A perfect complement to the Garden Route, the Friendly City is a major sea port and tourist destination set along the beautiful shores of Nelson Mandela Bay. The centre of the South African motor industry is spoiled by moderate and warm temperatures all year round with scattered rain throughout the year - climatic attributes which contribute to an outstanding quality of life. A popular and significant destination for water sports, Port Elizabeth also offers many historical attractions, such as the Historic Donkin Heritage trail, taking visitors along the footsteps of the 1820 settlers. British heritage is reflected in the Port Elizabeth Cricket Club, and the Oldest Bowling Green in South Africa. Port Elizabeth’s greatest treasures, however, are malaria-free wildlife areas in its vicinity, and clean beaches washed by warm water.

Port Elizabeth was founded by British settlers in 1820 and was named after the wife of Rufane Donkin, Acting Governor of the Cape Colony at that time. The city is located on the Algoa Bay and forms together with the neighboring towns of Uitenhage and Despatch the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Municipality.

The tourist information is in the Donkin Reserve in the town center and another office at The Boardwalk (Marine Drive).

Get in

By plane

Port Elizabeth Airport[2] is located just a few kilometres out of the city and has regular flights to Johannesburg, Cape Town, Durban and other South African airports. See also Discount airlines in Africa.

By train

The central train station is in the city centre near the harbour.

Shosholoza Meyl [3] operates daily inter-city trains to Johannesburg and Bloemfontein. You can also get to Cape Town, Kimberley, Pietermaritzburg and Durban (by changing trains in Bloemfontein), to East London (by changing trains in Noupoort, Colesburg or Bloemfontein), to Mthatha (by changing trains in Noupoort and Amabele) or to Grahamstown (by changing trains in Alicedale).

Premier Classe [4] operates twice-weekly luxury trains to Cape Town via George and Oudtshoorn.

MetroRail [5] operates frequent commuter trains to Uitenhage and the surrounding suburbs during weekdays, with a reduced service over weekends.

The Apple Express [6] is a narrow-gauge (2 feet/610 mm) tourist train that operates from a separate station in Humewood Road near King's Beach. It departs regularly for Thornhill Village via the Van Staden's River bridge, the highest narrow-gauge rail bridge in the world.

By car

Port Elizabeth is easily accessible by motorways from Cape Town (790 km) via the Garden Route, Bloemfontein and East London (310 km). Of course, you can also drive from Johannesburg.

By bus

All major South African coach companies offer regular schedules to and from Port Elizabeth. The city is also on the Baz Bus route[7].

Get around

By car

All the national car rental agencies have offices in the city.

  • CABS Car hire, 90A Hugh Road, Walmer, +27 (0)21 386 5500 (, fax: +27 (0)21 385 1110), [8].  edit

Public bus

There is a public bus transport system within the city. It is, a better option than taxis based off of comfort but not promptness. The buses are slow and often not on schedule. Further, the buses do not really cover the nooks and crannys of the city. There is also the issue of getting your fingers on a timetable, which is hard, but the Tourist Information are known to have a copy sometimes. As there are no timetables at the stops or even at the main terminal, this is a key issue. Safety is a common worry on Public transport in South Africa as a whole and tourists should remain alert whilst utilising services.

  • Algoa Bus Company, +27 (0)41 404-1200.  edit
  • Hurter Cabs, +27 (0)41 585-5500 (). Credit cards accepted.  edit
  • King Cab, +27 (0)41 368-5559. Credit cards accepted.  edit

Taxi

The main form of transportation for most people is the (minibus) taxi. Toyota Hiaces or VW Caravelles or the like, modified to cram in as many seats as possible, will take you across town for R4.50. Some of them are still more a road hazard than anything, but a recent clean-up in the taxi industry means that their standards are improving.

Each taxi operates on a laid-out route. They are more frequent during daytime than at night.

How to get on. Stand on the curve of a trafficked road. When a taxi approaches, it may flash its headlights to 'ask' if you want to go. Just stick your hand out.

How to get off. You might be able to tell the 'bouncer' your desired destination when you pay, but in any case just tell the driver "next stop", in a clear, firm voice, if you can make yourself heard above the music pounding from the sound system.

Note that this is not always a safe way to travel.

  • As of Feb 2009, taxi strikes have become common. Taxi drivers are protesting the new transportation plans and upgrades ahead of the 2010 world cup. In early February a PE taxi protest turned violent with taxi drivers stoning buses and possibly aiding in the derailment of a train outside PE.
Live entertainment at the Boardwalk
Live entertainment at the Boardwalk
  • Donkin Reserve. In memory of Rufane Donkin and his wife Elizabeth, after whom the city is named. The lighthouse built in 1861 is open to the public. PE tourism has their office here  edit
  • Townships: organized tours are offered by the Tourist information. There is a safety concern regarding township tours though.
  • Alexandria Dune Fields. The largest coastal dune field in the southern hemisphere is located just outside PE at the villages of Colchester and Cannonville.  edit
  • Tour Nelson Mandela Bay City, Dickens Street, Central Port Elizabeth, +27 (0)41 373-7758, [9]. See Town Hall, Feather Market Hall, the Old Post Office, Fort Frederick, Donkin Reserve, Settlers Park, and the Horse Memorial all in one fabulous tour.  edit
  • Wezandla African Arts and Crafts Gallery, 27 Baakens Str, +27 (0)41 585-1185 (fax: +27 (0)41 585-1186), [10]. Browse African Art  edit
Dolphin Show at the Bayworld
Dolphin Show at the Bayworld
SAAF Museum Oxford restoration project
SAAF Museum Oxford restoration project
  • South Africa Airforce Museum, +27 (0)41 505-1295 (fax: +27 (0)41 505-1403), [11]. Open 8AM to 3:30PM Mon to Fri and 10AM to 6PM on Sun. Entrance is free.  edit
  • Bayworld, Marine Drive, Humewood, +27 (0)41 584-0650, [12]. Open 9AM to 4:30PM. Dolphin performances at 11AM and 3PM. Has a museum, oceanarium and snake park.  edit
  • Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Art Museum, St George's Park entrance, +27 (0)41 586-1030. Open 9AM to 5PM, Monday to Friday. 2PM to 5PM on Saturdays and Sundays. A selection of South African art, especially from the Eastern Cape  edit
  • No 7 Castle Hill Museum, +27 (0)41 582-2515. Open 10AM to 1PM and 2PM to 5PM, Tuesday to Friday. 2PM to 5PM on Mondays and 10AM to 1PM on Saturdays. Dating back to 1827, it is the oldest Settler cottage in PE. Entrance fee is R6.  edit
  • Red Location Museum, +27 (0)41 408-8400 (, fax: +27 (0)41 408-8401), [13]. 10am to 4pm Tues to Fri and 9am to 3pm Sat and Sun. The museum which bridges the past with the future Adults:R12, Pensioners, Disabled and Unemployed: Free on Wed between 12pm and 4pm, Discount for students.  edit
Hobie Beach
Hobie Beach

PE is a wonderful jumping-off spot for game viewing. There are elephants and other birds and animals at Addo Elephant National Park and many privately owned game reserves in the area.

  • African Dawn (Wildlife Sanctuary), [14]. African Dawn Bird and Wildlife Sanctuary offers a selection of birds and wildlife to view  edit
  • Beaches. Hobie, Humewood, Kings and Wells Estate Beach are the main swimming beaches. Humewood and Wells have been awarded Blue Flag status while Kings and Hobie are currently being evaluated.  edit
  • Algoa Bay Yacht Club, [15]. Have a meal and go sailing  edit
  • Apple Express, +27 (0)41 583-2030, [16]. A 100 km narrow gauge classic steam trip with a stop on the Van Stadens River Bridge. R130 for adults and R60 for kids under 13.  edit
  • Boardwalk Casino, +27 (0)41 507-7777 ().  edit
  • Kragga Kamma Game Park, (Follow the M15 west from the city center for about 15 minutes), +27 (0)41 379-4195 (), [17]. Gates are open from 8AM to 5PM. You can either sleep in the camp or take self drives during the Day. White Rhino, Buffalo, Cheetah, Giraffe, Zebra and others. Excellent value small park. R30 entrance fee.  edit
  • Links Humewood Golf course, [18].  edit
  • Raggy Charters, +27 (0)41 378-2528 (). Whale Watching, Penguin Island Cruises and Fishing Charters  edit
  • The Mountain Club of South Africa, +27 (0)41 365-5543 (), [19]. Climbs, walks and a rock climbing school.  edit
  • Voetsac Hiking Club, +27 (0)41 581-2109. There are a number of hiking trail, and walks in and around the city: Maitland Nature Reserve, Aloe Hiking Trail and more.  edit
  • The Peoples Observatory, cnr Westview and Macfarlane, Newton Park, +27 (0)41 363-9040. Meetings every first and third Wednesday of the month at 8PM. View the southern skies.  edit
  • Roseate Tern hiking trial, Next to Pine Lodge Resort off Marine Drive, Summerstrand, +27 (0)41 585-9711. 9 km circular trail.  edit
  • Sandboarding, +27 (0)41 586-2276 (). The Maitland dune mountain is one of the largest in the country and perfect for sand boarding.  edit
  • Surf. The Pipe at Pollok Beach is where you want to go for surfing.  edit
  • Eastern Cape Wilderness Motorcycle Tour, (Central Port Elizabeth, Dickens Street), +27 (0)41 373-7785 (), [20]. A motorcycle tour starting and ending in Port Elizabeth that takes you through the superb Eastern, Southern and Western Cape regions of South Africa.  edit

Scuba diving

There are a number of very good diving locations:

  • Bell Buoy - Depth 12m to 18m. Colorful soft coral and a rocky bottom.
  • Devil's Reef - Depth 7m with pinnacles up to 1m.
  • Evan's Peak - Depth 12m to 40m. Close to St. Croix island.
  • Haerlem Wreck - Depth 21m. Navy vessel sunk in 1987
  • Phillips Reef - Visibility up to 10m.
  • Riy Banks - Depth 18m to 40m. Coral and game fish.
  • Thunderbolt Reef - Depth 15m to 30m. Orange and lilac hard coral.
  • Ocean Divers International, 10 Albert Road, Walmer, +27 (0)41 581-5121 (), [21]. One of the oldest dive schools in South Africa. PADI courses, own training center with indoor pool.  edit
  • Pro Dive, (At Hobie Beach), +27 (0)41 368-7880, [22].  edit
African Curios for sale
African Curios for sale
  • Curios can be bought along the beach. Haggle down the prices though.
  • African Hides can be purchased by appointment from Ostrich Emporium SA +27 (0)41 5812148.
  • Siyalcha Dolls, +27 (0)41 454-3465. Traditional Xhoza dolls  edit
The Boardwalk Shopping Complex
The Boardwalk Shopping Complex
  • The Boardwalk, Marine Drive, Summerstrand, +27 (0)41 507-777 (). Offers several shops. fast-food restaurants and a casino  edit
  • Greenacres Shopping Centre. An excellent place to spend a Saturday at around noon. There are many, many shops and plenty of restaurants. There is a lively vibe over the weekend, and the mall can be reached easily. It is also commonly refered to as "The Bridge", because it is joined to the mall of that name.  edit
  • Walmer Park Shopping Centre. A nice place to eat at, and there are a few nice shops.  edit

Eat

Brooke's Pavilion has excellent views over the beaches and ocean. Any one of the restaurants there are a good idea for breakfast with a view.

  • Blue Waters Cafe, [23]. Well priced and has an excellent view of the ocean.  edit
  • Fishmonger, The Broadwalk, Marine Drive, Summerstrand, +27 (0)41 583-6895. Indulge yourself in succulent prawns, calamari, fish & chips and curries.  edit
  • Leonardo's, The Broadwalk, Marine Drive, Summerstrand, +27 (0)41 583-1302 (fax: +27 (0)41 583-1304). Fantastic pizza, and has a very pleasant atmosphere.  edit
  • Mauro's, Restaurant No. 1, McArthur Bath, Beach Road, Humewood, +27 (0)41 582-2700 (fax: +27 (0)41 582-3629). About R100 a meal.  edit
  • Ocean Grill, Mercado Centre, Corner of Admiralty and Strandfontein Roads, Summerstrand. Seafood restaurant with classy and elegant decor ; serves good sushi and other seafood meals.  edit
  • Old Austria. Is just off Cape Road and is one of the classier restaurants in Port Elizabeth.  edit
  • The Oyster Catcher, +27 (0)41 582-1867 (fax: +27 (0)41 582-1869). Located in the harbour. The seafood is particularly tasty. Very popular - if you want to get a table you must make a reservation.  edit
  • Tiffany's, Brookes Hill, Beach Road, Humewood, +27 (0)41 584-0696. Tea, coffee, light meals and fantastic pastries and cakes in a great location looking out over the sea.  edit
  • Barney's Tavarn, +27 (0)41 583-4500. Lively pub.  edit
  • Ekhaya Pub, +27 (0)41 586-1156. For African Jazz  edit
  • Ibhayi Brewery Tours, 47 Kohler Street, +27 (0)41 404-3527 (). Tour the beer brewery and have a couple of pints at the Bay and Barrel afterwards.  edit
  • News Cafe. Located at the Boardwalk and is always lively and full. They serve good food, and it is a nice place to catch a drink.  edit
  • Blackbeards Tavern, Within The Chapman Hotel, [24]. Does a splendid Seafood Extravaganza.  edit
  • Tapas Part of Brookes pavilions. Live music over weekends. Good place to get loaded on beers. Get there early if you want to sit down.
This guide uses the following price ranges for a standard double room:
Budget Under R500
Mid-range R500 to R1000
Splurge Over R1000

Accommodation ranges from hostels to more luxury accommodation. Whatever you want, you can find without trouble.

  • Kings Beach Backpackers, 41 Windermere Road, Humewood, +27 (0)41 585-8113 (, fax: +27 (0)41 585-1693), [25]. Cool little backpackers with friendly staff. Check out the kitchen you have to add your name and comment to the millions added over the years by previous backpackers. The staff can arrange safari trips to Addo and Schotia Safari Parks for around R1000 (be warned that this is R200 more expensive than doing it yourself, but this does include travel to and from the parks, which are approx 30 miles away. From R60 pppn.  edit
  • Lungile Backpackers, 12 La Roche Drive, +27 (0)41 585-2042 (, fax: +27 (0)41 585-2083). Offers private single/ double rooms as well as dorms and has a pool.  edit
  • All Africa Wildlife Backpackers, Sanctuary Road, R102, +27 (0)083 6615 393 (), [26]. Rates range from R100 per person to R300 per room, Located in the Heart of a Game Reserve. Wake in the morning with wildlife on your doorstep..  edit
  • Algoa Guest House, 87 Brighton Drive, Summerstrand, Port Elizabeth, 0415833511, [27]. checkin: 15h00; checkout: 11h00. We are located in the beautiful upmarket seaside suburb of Summerstrand - only 200 metres from the beach and in close proximity to the airport, university, golf course, restaurants and casino. Tourists and business people alike enjoy a relaxing stay at Algoa Guest House. All suites are private and comfortable with a mini kitchenette and their own entrances and patios. Suites are serviced daily and have free internet access, TV’s and DVD facilities. from R320 per person sharing.  edit
  • The Admiralty Beach House, 9 Admiralty Way, Summerstrand, +27 (0)41 583-1271 (, fax: +27 (0)41 583-3720), [28]. Located 100m from Summerstrands Beach, near Marine Drive. It features a wonderful garden and some rooms have sea-view. ADSL is available in all rooms From R340.  edit
  • Alcyone Accommodation, 29 Admiralty Way, Summerstrand, +27 (0)84 693-1483, [29]. Offers you self-catering accommodation in a 1 bedroom studio with sea views; 500m from the beach, close to the Humewood Golf course and Hobbie Beach; fully equipped and with internet connection From R250.  edit
  • At Sta-Plus Guest House, 11A,10th Avenue, Summerstrand, +27(0)415834112 (), [30]. Large sheltered swimming pool, BBQ facilities, off-street parking, laundry service. 150m from Pollock Beach, 5 min from golf course, university, or boardwalk casino.  edit
  • The Beach Hotel, In the Boardwalk complex, +27 (0)41 583-2161 (, fax: +27 (0)41 583-6220), [31]. 4 star From R430 per person sharing.  edit
  • Beachwalk B&B, 1 Second Ave, Summerstrand, +27 (0)41 583-3594 (), [32]. 60m from the beach and 400m from the Boardwalk. 4 star From R250 pp sharing.  edit
  • Bishops Inn, 14 Killarney Road, +27 (0)41 585-6828 (, fax: +27 (0)41 585-6850), [33]. checkin: from 14:30; checkout: until 10:30. Bishops Inn offers superior rooms and 1&2-Bedroom self-catering suites opposite Kings Beach. All rooms have Wi-Fi access. From R439 to R1020 per unit per night. (33°58'29.81S,25°38'26.95E) edit
  • Conifer Beach House, 39 Windermere Road, Humewood, +27(0)41 5855959 (), [34]. 4 Star accommodation. Saltwater swimming pool, 2 minutes walk from Kings Beach, off-street parking, laundry service, WiFi. Close to golf course, university and boardwalk casino.  edit
  • Edward Protea Hotel, Belmont Terrace, +27 (0)41 586-2056 (fax: +27 (0)41 586-4925). Located on the northern end of the Donkin Reserve. May have seen better times but still offers Edwardian style and wonderful views over the Donkin Reserve to the Ocean.  edit
  • Hacklewood Hill Country House, Prospect Road, Walmer, +27 (0)41 581-1300 (), [35]. Luxury 5 star treatment. WiFi available  edit
  • Holiday Inn, Humewood. Close to King's Beach. The hotel is a short walk away from Bayworld Aquarium.  edit
  • Kragga Kamma Game Park, (Follow the M15 west from the city center for about 15 minutes), +27 (0)41 379-4195 (), [36]. Luxury tents, thatched chalets, log cabins and thatched lodges. Book for two nights or more and get a free game drive From R150 to R300 per person per night.  edit
  • Pine Lodge Resort, Marine Drive, Cape Recife, +27 (0)41 583-4004 (), [37]. 3 star log cabins in the Cape Recife Nature Reserve From R300 to R1000 per unit per night.  edit
  • Seaview Hotel, +27 (0)41 378-1611 (, fax: +27 (0)41 378-1653), [38]. Build in 1935. 20 km outside the city on the way to Seaview  edit
  • Sir Roys at the Sea, cnr Perrot and Newcon roads, +27 (0)41 582-2377 (), [39]. R250 to R250 pp sharing.  edit
  • Treetops Guest House, 44 Albert road, Walmer, +27 (0)41 581-0147 (, fax: +27 (0)41 581-5525). Free transfers to and from the airport  edit
  • Belgian, 16C Lower Valley Road, Baakens Valley, +27 (0)41 582-2275. 9AM to 12PM, Monday to Friday.  edit
  • British, 5th Floor, First Bowring House, 66 Ring Road, Greenacres, +27 (0)41 363-8840 (fax: +27 (0)41 363-8842). Open 9AM to 12:30PM, Monday to Friday.  edit
  • Danish, 3 Fearick Street, Sidwell, +27 (0)41 453-2696. 8AM to 5PM, Monday to Thursday and 8AM to 12PM on Friday.  edit
  • French, 3 Digby Road, Framesby, +27 (0)41 360-2730. 8AM to 4:30PM, Monday to Friday.  edit
  • German, 1 Circular Drive / The Fig Tree, +27 (0)41 397-4721 (fax: +27 (0)41 397-4730). Open 8:30AM to 12:30PM, Monday to Friday. (33°58'44.62S,25°33'10.58E) edit
  • Italian, 16 Dyason Street, Mount Croix, +27 (0)41 373-6443. 10:30AM to 12:30PM, Monday and Wednesday and 8:30AM to 10:30PM, Tuesday and Friday.  edit

Local parks

There are many local safari and nature parks within easy reach of PE:

This is a usable article. It has information for getting in as well as some complete entries for restaurants and hotels. An adventurous person could use this article, but please plunge forward and help it grow!

1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

PORT ELIZABETH, a seaport of the Cape province, South Africa, in Algoa Bay, by which name the port is often designated.

It lies in 35° 57 S ., 2 5° 37 E. on the east side of Cape Recife, being by sea 436 m. from Cape Town and 384 m. from Durban. In size and importance it is second only to Cape Town among the towns of the province. It is built partly along the seashore and partly on the slopes and top of the hills that rise some 200 ft. above the bay. The Baaken's River, usually a small stream, but subject (as in 1908) to disastrous floods, runs through the town, which consists of four divisions; the harbour and business quarter at the foot of the cliffs, the upper part, a flat table-land known as "The Hill"; "The Valley" formed by the Baaken's River; and "South Hill," east of the river.

The Town. - Jetty Street leads from the north jetty to the market square, in or around which are grouped the chief public buildings - the town-hall, court-house, post office, market buildings, public library, St Mary's church (Anglican) and St Augustine's (Roman Catholic). Several of these buildings are of considerable architec tural merit and fine elevation. The library, of Elizabethan design, contains some 45,000 volumes. The market buildings, at the south-east corner of the square, and partly excavated from the sides of the cliff, contain large halls for the fruit, wool and feather markets and the museum. Feather-Market Hall, where are held the sales of ostrich feathers, seats 5000 persons. The museum has valuable ethnographical and zoological collections. Other public buildings include a synagogue and a Hindu temple. Leading west from Market Square is Main Street, in which are the principal business houses.. Between Main Street and the sea is Strand Street, also a busy commercial thoroughfare. Behind the lower town streets rise in terraces to "The Hill," a residential district. Here is an open plot of ground, Donkin Reserve, containing the lighthouse and a stone pyramid with an inscription in memory of Elizabeth, wife of Sir Rufane Donkin, described as "one of the most perfect of human beings, who has given her name to the town below." A fountain, surmounted by the statue of a war-horse, erected by public subscription in 1905 commemorates "the services of the gallant animals which perished in the Anglo-Boer war, 1899-1902." Farther west is a large hospital, one of the finest institutions of its kind in South Africa. At the southern end of The Hill is St George's Park, which has some fine trees, in marked contrast to the general treeless, barren aspect of the town. Port Elizabeth indeed possesses few natural amenities, but its golf links are reputed the finest in South Africa. The town, apart from its transit trade and the industries connected therewith, has some manufactures - jam and confectionery works; oil, candle and explosive works; saw and flour mills; tanneries, &c. It has an excellent water supply.

The Harbour. - There is no enclosed basin, but the roadstead has. excellent holding ground, protected from all winds except the southeast, the prevailing wind being westerly. No harbour or light dues are charged to vessels of any flag. The port has three jetties of wrought iron, respectively 1162, 1152 and 1462 ft. in length, extending to the four fathoms line. These jetties are provided with hydraulic cranes, &c., and railways connect them with the main line, so that goods can be sent direct from the jetties to every part of South Africa. In favourable weather vessels drawing up to 21 ft. can discharge cargo alongside the jetties. In unfavourable conditions and for larger steamers tugs and lighters are employed. Rough weather prevents discharge of cargo by lighters, on an average, seven days in the year. The customs-house and principal railway station are close to the north jetty. The port is state owned, and is under the administration of the harbour and railway board of the Union.

Trade

Port Elizabeth has a large import trade, chiefly in textiles, machinery, hardware, apparel and provisions, supplying to a considerable extent the markets of Kimberley, Rhodesia, the Orange Free State and the Transvaal. The exports are mainly the products of the eastern part of the Cape province, the most important being ostrich feathers, wool and mohair. Skins, hides and maize are also exported. In 1855 the value of the imports was £376,000; in 1883 £2,364,000; in 1898 £6,248,000; in 1903 £10,137,000. Depression in trade brought down the imports in 1904 to £6,855,000. In 1906 they were £6,564,000 and in 1907 £6,004,000. The export trade has been of slower but more steady growth. It was valued at £584,000 in 1855, at £2,341,000 in 1883, £2,103,000 in 1898, £2,010,000 in 1903. Indicative of the fact that the agricultural community was little affected by the trade depression are the export figures for 1904 and 1906, which were £2,044,000 and £2,627,000 respectively. In 1907 goods valued at £3,150,000 were exported.

Population

The population within the municipal area was at the 1904 census 3 2 ,959; that within the district of Port Elizabeth 46,626, of whom 23,782 were whites. Many of the inhabitants are of German origin and the Deutsche Liedertafel is one of the most popular clubs in the town.

History

Algoa Bay was discovered by Bartholomew Diaz in 1488, and was by him named Bahia da Roca, probably with reference to the rocky islet in the bay, on which he is stated to have erected a cross (St Croix Island). After the middle of the 16th century the bay was called by the Portuguese Bahia da Lagoa, whence its modern designation. In 1754 the Dutch settlements at the Cape were extended eastwards as far as Algoa Bay. The convenience of reaching the eastern district by boat was then recognized and advantage taken of the roadstead sheltered by Cape Recife. In 1799, during the first occupation of Cape Colony by the British, Colonel (afterwards General Sir John) Vandeleur, to guard the roadstead, built a small fort on the hill west of the Baaken's River. It was named Fort Frederick in honour of the then duke of York, and is still preserved. A few houses grew up round the fort, and in 1820 besides the military there was a civilian population at Fort Frederick of about 35 persons. In April of that year arrived in the bay the first of some 4000 British immigrants, who settled in the eastern district of the colony (See Cape Colony: History). Under the supervision of Sir Rufane Donkin, acting governor of the Cape, a town was laid out at the base of the hills. In 1836 it was made a free warehousing port, and in 1837 the capital of a small adjacent district. To overcome the difficulty of landing from the roadstead a breakwater was built at the mouth of the Baakens River in 1856, but it had to be removed in 1869, as it caused a serious accumulation of sand. The prosperity which followed the construction of railways to the interior earned for the port the designation of "the Liverpool of South Africa." Railway work was begun in 1873 and Port Elizabeth is now in direct communication with all other parts of South Africa. At the same period (1873) the building of the existing jetties was undertaken. Port Elizabeth has possessed municipal government since 1836. Its predominant British character is shown by the fact that not until 1909 was the foundation stone laid of the first Dutch Reformed Church in the town.


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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

English

Proper noun

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Port Elizabeth

  1. Port of Eastern Cape, South Africa

Translations

  • French: Port Elizabeth

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