Portmanteau: Wikis

  
  
  

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Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

.A portmanteau (pronounced /pɔrtmænˈtoʊ/  ( listen)) or portmanteau word is used broadly to mean a blend of two (or more) words or morphemes and their meanings into one new word.^ You see it's like a portmanteau -- there are two meanings packed up into one word."
  • A.Word.A.Day --portmanteau 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC wordsmith.org [Source type: General]
  • Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC etext.lib.virginia.edu [Source type: Original source]
  • In a slump, but still reading | Conceptual Guerilla 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC www.conceptualguerilla.com [Source type: Original source]
  • RPO -- Lewis Carroll : Jabberwocky 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC rpo.library.utoronto.ca [Source type: Original source]

^ You see it's like a portmanteau—there are two meanings packed up into one word.'
  • A biography of Lewis Carroll by Derek Hudson 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC www.ourcivilisation.com [Source type: Original source]

^ A portmanteau is a combination of two known words.
  • TrafficSynergy Online Marketing Questions Answered | Freemium=Free+Premium? 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC www.trafficsynergy.co.za [Source type: General]

[1][2][3] .In linguistics fields, a portmanteau is defined as a blend of two or more function words.^ A portmanteau is a combination of two known words.
  • TrafficSynergy Online Marketing Questions Answered | Freemium=Free+Premium? 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC www.trafficsynergy.co.za [Source type: General]

^ Portmanteau Words Blending the form and meaning of two different words results in a portmanteau word.

^ The word "portmanteau" is itself a blend of two words.

[4][5][6][7]

Contents

Meaning

"Portmanteau word" is used to describe a linguistic blend, namely "a word formed by blending sounds from two or more distinct words and combining their meanings."[1] The plural form of "portmanteau" may be portmanteaux or portmanteaus.[2]
.Such a definition of "portmanteau word" overlaps with the grammatical term contraction.^ Definition of: portmanteau See portmanteau word .
  • Portmanteau Definition from PC Magazine Encyclopedia 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC www.pcmag.com [Source type: General]

^ "Portmanteau" itself is such a word.
  • Carrol's portmanteaus-Ӣ���Ķ��� 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC www.enread.com [Source type: Original source]

^ RELATED TERMS: portmanteau word .
  • Portmanteau Definition from PC Magazine Encyclopedia 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC www.pcmag.com [Source type: General]

.As an example of the latter, the words do and not become the contraction don't, a single word that represents the meaning of the combined words.^ As an example, the words do and not become the contraction don't , a single word that represents the meaning of the combined words.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ A folk usage of portmanteau refers to a word formed by combining both sounds and meanings from two or more words (e.g., spork from spoon and fork, animatronics ...
  • Lactams Dictionary Definition - Glossary.com 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC www.glossary.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ A new word formed by joining two others and combining their meanings .
  • What does portmanteau mean? definition and meaning (Free English Language Dictionary) 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC www.audioenglish.net [Source type: Original source]

.A distinction can be made between the portmanteau and a contraction by noting that contractions can only be formed with two words that would otherwise appear in sequence within the sentence, whereas a portmanteau word is typically formed by combining two or more existing words that all relate to a singular concept which the portmanteau word is meant to describe.^ "Portmanteau word" is used to describe a linguistic blend , namely "a word formed by blending sounds from two or more distinct words and combining their meanings."
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ The word "auditorium" also comes from the Greek, and the two have been combined in the portmanteau word "gymnatorium."
  • What is a gymnatorium, and when and where was the term originated? 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC www.funtrivia.com [Source type: General]

^ Portmanteau Portmanteau words are words that are formed by telescoping two other words in on themselves.

.An example is the well-known portmanteau word "Spanglish", referring to speaking a mix of both Spanish and English spoken between bilingual people.^ An example is the well-known portmanteau word "Spanglish", referring to speaking a mix of both Spanish and English spoken between bilingual people.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ A folk usage of portmanteau refers to a word formed by combining both sounds and meanings from two or more words (e.g., spork from spoon and fork, animatronics ...
  • Lactams Dictionary Definition - Glossary.com 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC www.glossary.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ An early and well-known example, Bennifer , referred to film stars (and former couple) Ben Affleck and Jennifer Lopez .
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

In this case, there is no logical situation in which the speaker would say "Spanish English" in place of the portmanteau word in the same way they could say "do not" in place of the contraction "don't", or "we are" in place of "we're".

Origin

The usage of the word "portmanteau" in this sense first appeared in Lewis Carroll's book Through the Looking-Glass (1871),[1] in which Humpty Dumpty explains to Alice the coinage of the unusual words in Jabberwocky,[8] where "slithy" means "lithe and slimy" and "mimsy" is "flimsy and miserable." Humpty Dumpty tries to justify his habit of changing the meaning of words and combining them in various ways by telling Alice,
'When I use a word... it means just what .I choose it to mean—neither more nor less.'^ "When I use a word," Humpty Dumpty said, in a rather scornful tone, "it means just what I choose it to mean, neither more nor less."
  • In a slump, but still reading | Conceptual Guerilla 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC www.conceptualguerilla.com [Source type: Original source]

.'The question is,' said Alice, 'whether you CAN make words mean so many different things.'^ "The question is," said Alice, "whether you can make words mean so many different things."
  • In a slump, but still reading | Conceptual Guerilla 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC www.conceptualguerilla.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Things that make you go 'hmmn.'
  • In a slump, but still reading | Conceptual Guerilla 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC www.conceptualguerilla.com [Source type: Original source]

^ For example, a movie reviewer might say that the film "was a portmanteau of tired cliches and hackneyed dialogue" and an anthopologist might point out that "The word 'culture' is a portmanteau that can mean many things to different people."
  • Portmanteau@Everything2.com 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: General]

.'The question is,' said Humpty Dumpty, 'which is to be master—that's all.'^ "Some people," said Humpty Dumpty, looking away from her as usual, "have no more sense than a baby!"
  • Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC etext.lib.virginia.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ They may write such things in a book," Humpty Dumpty said in a calmer tone.
  • Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC etext.lib.virginia.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ "Of course it must," Humpty Dumpty said with a short laugh: my name means the shape I am -- and a good handsome shape it is, too.
  • Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC etext.lib.virginia.edu [Source type: Original source]

In his introduction to The Hunting of the Snark, Carroll uses "portmanteau" again when discussing lexical selection:
.
Humpty Dumpty's theory, of two meanings packed into one word like a portmanteau, seems to me the right explanation for all.^ You see it's like a portmanteau -- there are two meanings packed up into one word."
  • Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC etext.lib.virginia.edu [Source type: Original source]
  • In a slump, but still reading | Conceptual Guerilla 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC www.conceptualguerilla.com [Source type: Original source]
  • RPO -- Lewis Carroll : Jabberwocky 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC rpo.library.utoronto.ca [Source type: Original source]

^ You see it's like a portmanteau—there are two meanings packed up into one word.'
  • A biography of Lewis Carroll by Derek Hudson 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC www.ourcivilisation.com [Source type: Original source]

^ "You see," says Humpty, "it's like a portmanteau -- there are two meanings packed up into one word."

.For instance, take the two words "fuming" and "furious."^ Instead of being witty, charming, or funny, you can simply take two words, cram them together, and call yourself clever.
  • DelSquacho » Enough with the Portmanteaus, Already 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC www.delsquacho.com [Source type: General]
  • DelSquacho » Enough with the Portmanteaus, Already 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC www.delsquacho.com [Source type: General]

^ When properly analyzed, "flexitarian" is not formed by taking a root morpheme and adding two suffixes like many of the words from the above list.
  • A Walk in the WoRds: Flexible Portmanteau Word Formation - Flexitarian 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC walkinthewords.blogspot.com [Source type: General]

.Make up your mind that you will say both words ...^ Make up your mind that you will say both words ...
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ Look up your word now!
  • Thinkmap Visual Thesaurus - An online thesaurus and dictionary of over 145,000 words that you explore using an interactive map. 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC www.visualthesaurus.com [Source type: General]

^ You see it's like a portmanteau -- there are two meanings packed up into one word."
  • Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC etext.lib.virginia.edu [Source type: Original source]
  • In a slump, but still reading | Conceptual Guerilla 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC www.conceptualguerilla.com [Source type: Original source]
  • RPO -- Lewis Carroll : Jabberwocky 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC rpo.library.utoronto.ca [Source type: Original source]

you will say "frumious."
[8]
.The word "portmanteau" itself was converted by Carroll to describe the concept.^ "Portmanteau" itself is such a word.
  • Carrol's portmanteaus-Ӣ���Ķ��� 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC www.enread.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Portmanteau is itself a portmanteau word.

^ Portmanteau is itself a portmanteau word, originating from the French portemanteau, a compound formed from porter (to carry) and manteau (cloak).

."Portmanteau" comes from French porter, to carry + manteau, cloak (from Old French mantel, from Latin mantellum).^ A portmanteau was a suitcase; according to the The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language , the word portmanteau comes from French porter , to carry + manteau , cloak (from Old French mantel , from Latin mantellum ).
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ Portmanteau is itself a portmanteau word, originating from the French portemanteau, a compound formed from porter (to carry) and manteau (cloak).

^ The word was coined by English author Lewis Carroll in “Through the Looking Glass,” although it does stem from the French “porter,” to carry, and “manteau,” a cape or mantle.
  • Kominicki, Up Front » By any other word, a woman scorned is still just that 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC libn.com [Source type: General]

[9] In then-contemporary English, a portmanteau was a suitcase. .In modern French, a portemanteau (or porte-manteaux) is a clothes valet, a coat-tree or similar article of furniture for hanging up jackets, hats, umbrellas and the like.^ Funky linguistics aside, this is one cool way to hang up a coat...
  • Portmanteau Clothes Rack by Sonata Paruccini | Apartment Therapy Chicago 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC www.apartmenttherapy.com [Source type: General]

Examples

Standard English

.
The original "Gerrymander" pictured in an 1812 cartoon.
^ The original " Gerrymander " pictured in an 1812 cartoon.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

The word is a portmanteau of Massachusetts Governor Gerry's name, with "salamander"
.Many neologisms are examples of blends, but many blends have become part of the lexicon.^ The word is a portmanteau of Massachusetts Governor Gerry's name, with " salamander " A spork Many neologisms are examples of blends, but many blends have become part of the lexicon.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ Many technical and military blends have also become part of our vocabulary: transistor, pixel, napalm, photonics, optronics, modem, avionics, bit, lox (liquid oxygen), camcorder, cyborg.
  • The Vocabula Review - Language Module 24 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC www.vocabula.com [Source type: General]

^ There are many examples of borrowed word blends in Japanese.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

[8] In Punch in 1896, the word brunch (breakfast + lunch) was introduced as a "portmanteau word."[10] The word "smog" was coined around 1893 or 1905 as a portmanteau of "smoke" and "fog". In 1964, the newly independent African republic of Tanganyika and Zanzibar chose the portmanteau word Tanzania as its name.
"Wikipedia" is an example of a portmanteau word because it combines the word "wiki" with the word "Encyclopedia."
.Portmanteau words may be produced by joining together proper nouns with common nouns, such as "gerrymandering," which refers to the scheme of Massachusetts Governor Elbridge Gerry for politically contrived redistricting: one of the districts created resembled a salamander in outline.^ One who creates portmanteaus .
  • neologasm: whole cloth Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC neologasm.org [Source type: General]

^ This group is all about the concept of portmanteau, combining two words or ideas together into one.
  • Flickr: Portmanteau 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: General]

^ Coined by Lewis Carroll, a portmanteau word is one formed by blending sounds from two or more distinct words and combining their meanings.

Non-standard English

.Many portmanteau words receive some usage but have not (yet) appeared in dictionaries.^ The usage of the word "portmanteau" in this sense first appeared in Lewis Carroll 's book Through the Looking-Glass (1871), [ 1 ] in which Humpty Dumpty explains to Alice the coinage of the unusual words in Jabberwocky : [ 8 ] .
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ Like learning any new word, there’s obviously some learning curve, but I’m definitely curious how easy/difficult it is to incorporate a portmanteau word versus a normal word.
  • LarrySavage.Com 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC larrysavage.com [Source type: General]

^ A number of portmanteau appear in the nonsense poem Jabberwocky, written by Lewis Carroll, also famous for writing Alice in Wonderland, and several new words come straight from his poems.
  • Bloggers Wanted - The Emurse.com Blog 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC blog.emurse.com [Source type: General]

.For example, a spork is an eating utensil that is a combination of a spoon and fork.^ A spork is an eating utensil that is a combination of a spoon and fork .
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ Other well know portmanteau’s are camcorder- camera and recorder, smog- smoke and fog and spork - spoon and fork.
  • 2005 January - Today’s Podcast 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC todayspodcast.com [Source type: General]

A skort is an item of clothing that is part skirt, part shorts.
"Jeoportmanteau!" is a recurring category on the American television quiz show Jeopardy!. The category's name is itself a portmanteau of "Jeopardy" and "portmanteau". Responses in the category are portmanteaus constructed by fitting two words together. For example, the clue "Brett Favre or John Elway plus a knapsack" yielded the response "What is a 'quarterbackpack'?"[11]
.Blaxploitation is a film genre/style, whose name derives from a portmanteau of "black" and "exploitation," reflecting its main theme of social problems, along with the stereotypical depiction of Black people in film.^ Generally the words he coins are derivatives of ones you already know, except for names of people.

[citation needed]
.Two proper names can also be used in creating a portmanteau word in reference to the partnership between people, especially in cases where both persons are well-known, or sometimes to produce epithets such as "Billary" (referring to former United States president Bill Clinton and his wife, United States Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton).^ The man is the President of the United States, with a family.
  • The Obamas' New Digs - The Daily Beast 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC www.thedailybeast.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ It was such a useful word that my wife and I have continued using it in many situations.

^ But has such a person ever thought about a portmanteau history and portmanteau name origins?
  • What is the Portmanteau History and What Does it Mean to me? 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC www.syl.com [Source type: Original source]

.In this example of recent American political history, the purpose for blending is not so much to combine the meanings of the source words but "to suggest a resemblance of one named person to the other"; the effect is often derogatory, as linguist Benjamin Zimmer notes.^ In this example of recent American political history, the purpose for blending is not so much to combine the meanings of the source words but "to suggest a resemblance of one named person to the other"; the effect is often derogatory, as linguist Benjamin Zimmer notes.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ Also, the suffix "-athon" is often appended to other words to connote a similarity to a marathon (for example, telethon , phonathon and walkathon ).
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ The term "portmanteau word" was invented by none other than Lewis Carroll (pen name of Charles Dodgson) in "Through the Looking Glass" to mean a word which combines both the sounds and meanings of two other words.

[12] .In contrast, the public and even the media use portmanteaux to refer to their favorite pairings as a way to "...giv[e] people an essence of who they are within the same name."^ In contrast, the public and even the media use portmanteaux to refer to their favorite pairings as a way to "...giv[e] people an essence of who they are within the same name."
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ Golput is used to refer to voters who abstain from voting, from Golongan Putih , "blank party" or "white party."
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ It's used to refer to a relationship in which they live together but they're not officially married, and it's not a nice word, by the way...mainly used by old people who are against that type of relations!
  • Portmanteau - English Spanish Translator Org: Translation Forum � Translators Forums 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC www.english-spanish-translator.org [Source type: Original source]

[13] This is particularly seen in cases of fictional and real-life "supercouples." An early and well-known example, Bennifer, referred to film stars (and former couple) Ben Affleck and Jennifer Lopez. .Other examples include Brangelina (Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie) and TomKat (Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes).^ Other examples include Brangelina ( Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie ) and TomKat ( Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes ).
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ Combining the names in a famous couple can be a way of implying that they are a brand, indistinguishable as individuals: Billary (Bill and Hillary Clinton); Brangelina (Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie).

.In double-barreled names, the hyphen is almost pushing one name away from the other.^ In double-barreled names, the hyphen is almost pushing one name away from the other.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ There was yet one other channel in which Tatlock could push inquiries.
  • EWWRP : Women's Genre Fiction Project : The Adventures of Tyler Tatlock : story 0 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC womenwriters.library.emory.edu [Source type: Original source]

[13] .Meshing says "I am you and you are me," notes one expert.^ Meshing says "I am you and you are me," notes one expert.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ One would say you were carrying me off."
  • Literature.org - The Online Literature Library 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC www.literature.org [Source type: Original source]
  • New Page 1 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC www.ywhc.net [Source type: Original source]

^ "You see," says Humpty, "it's like a portmanteau -- there are two meanings packed up into one word."

[13]
.Portmanteaux can also be created by attaching a prefix or suffix from one word to give that association to other words.^ Portmanteaux [ 2 ] can also be created by attaching a prefix or suffix from one word to give that association to other words.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ Also, the suffix "-athon" is often appended to other words to connote a similarity to a marathon (for example, telethon , phonathon and walkathon ).
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ Subsequent to the Watergate scandal , it became popular to attach the suffix "-gate" to other words to describe contemporary scandals, e.g.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

.Subsequent to the Watergate scandal, it became popular to attach the suffix "-gate" to other words to describe contemporary scandals, e.g.^ The suffix -gate is routinely attached as journalistic shorthand to anything that might be even vaguely scandalous.

^ "I am looking for a word to describe the somewhat nonsensical words created by adding a false suffix (e.g., '-gate' added to mean scandal, after Watergate, hence 'Troopergate'; '-aholic' added to mean dependency, after alcoholic, hence 'shopaholic')."

."Filegate" for the White House FBI files controversy, Nipplegate, and Spygate, an incident involving the 2007 New England Patriots.^ "Filegate" for the White House FBI files controversy , and Spygate , an incident involving the 2007 New England Patriots .
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

.Likewise, the suffix "-holism" or "-holic," taken from the word "alcoholism" or "alcoholic," can be added to a noun, creating a word that describes an addiction to that noun.^ "I am looking for a word to describe the somewhat nonsensical words created by adding a false suffix (e.g., '-gate' added to mean scandal, after Watergate, hence 'Troopergate'; '-aholic' added to mean dependency, after alcoholic, hence 'shopaholic')."

^ Portmanteaux [ 2 ] can also be created by attaching a prefix or suffix from one word to give that association to other words.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ Likewise, the suffix " -holism " or "-holic," taken from the word " alcoholism " or "alcoholic," can be added to a noun, creating a word that describes an addiction to that noun.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

.Chocoholic, for instance, means a person who is "addicted" to chocolate.^ Chocoholic , for instance, means a person who is "addicted" to chocolate.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

.Also, the suffix "-athon" is often appended to other words to connote a similarity to a marathon (for example, telethon, phonathon, triathalon and walkathon).^ Also, the suffix "-athon" is often appended to other words to connote a similarity to a marathon (for example, telethon , phonathon and walkathon ).
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ In this example of recent American political history, the purpose for blending is not so much to combine the meanings of the source words but "to suggest a resemblance of one named person to the other"; the effect is often derogatory, as linguist Benjamin Zimmer notes.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ Subsequent to the Watergate scandal , it became popular to attach the suffix "-gate" to other words to describe contemporary scandals, e.g.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

Charles Dickens used the portmanteau technique to name many of his characters, most notably "Scrooge" which results from the combination of "screw" and "gouge."[citation needed]

Modern Hebrew

Modern Hebrew abounds with European mechanisms such as blending: "Along with kómpaktdisk ‘compact disc’, Hebrew has the blend taklitór, which consists of the Hebrew-descent taklít ‘record’ and ór ‘light’. .Modern Hebrew is full of portmanteau blends [...] such as (1) arpíakh ‘smog’, from arafél ‘fog’ and píakh ‘soot’; (2) mídrakhov ‘(pedestrian) mall, promenade’, from midrakhá ‘footpath’ and rekhóv ‘street’; (3) makhazémer ‘musical’, from makhazé ‘play (n)’ and zémer ‘singing’; or (4) bohoráim ‘brunch’, from bóker ‘morning, breakfast (cf.^ Other common portmanteau words are "smog" ("smoke" and "fog"), and "brunch" ("breakfast" and "lunch").

^ "Motel" is just such a "portmanteau word" (what linguists call a "blend"), one word made by combining two other words.

^ Meaning 2 Origin 3 Examples 3.1 Examples in languages other than English 3.1.1 Modern Hebrew 3.1.2 Icelandic 3.1.3 Indonesian 3.1.4 Japanese 4 Portmanteau morph 5 See also 6 References .
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

arukhát bóker ‘breakfast’)’ and tsohoráim ‘noon, lunch (cf. arukhát tsohoráim ‘lunch’)’."[14] .There is also the uncommonly used politically incorrect term 'ashlav' which is a combination of 'ashpah' which means trash and 'lavan' which means white.^ The word “ Portmanteau ” is used to describe a linguistic blend , namely “a word formed by blending sounds from two or more distinct words and combining their meanings.” My favourites Portmanteau words include .

^ In linguistics, the term blend is used to refer to general combination of words, and the term "portmanteau" is reserved for the narrow sense of combining two function words .
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ "Portmanteau word" is used to describe a linguistic blend , namely "a word formed by blending sounds from two or more distinct words and combining their meanings."
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

Icelandic

.There is a tradition of linguistic purism in Icelandic and neologisms are frequently created from pre-existing words.^ I think we should distinguish between new words adapted from the existing vocabulary and those created from scratch.

^ I’ve always thought of portmanteaux as a way to remember things, creating new words from existing words, but I’m sure sometimes they make things harder to understand.
  • LarrySavage.Com 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC larrysavage.com [Source type: General]

^ I think healthy debate creates the best words, and here’s why: My method of word combining is frequently a display of verbal or mental diarrhea.
  • LarrySavage.Com 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC larrysavage.com [Source type: General]

.Tölva ("computer") is a portmanteau of tala ("digit; number") and völva ("seeress").^ Tölva ("computer") is a portmanteau of tala ("digit; number") and völva ("seeress").
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

[15]

Indonesian

.Golput is used to refer to voters who abstain from voting, from Golongan Putih, "blank party" or "white party."^ Golput is used to refer to voters who abstain from voting, from Golongan Putih , "blank party" or "white party."
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ In contrast, the public and even the media use portmanteaux to refer to their favorite pairings as a way to "...giv[e] people an essence of who they are within the same name."
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

[16]

Japanese

.There are many examples of borrowed word blends in Japanese.^ There are many examples of borrowed word blends in Japanese.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ Japanese words can be divided into wago (Japanese words), kango (words borrowed from varieties of Chinese), and gairaigo (loanwords, excluding Sino-Japanese).
  • Language Log » Quadrilingual Washlet Instructions 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu [Source type: General]

^ But many experts trace "meld" to the English dialectical word "melled," meaning "mingled or blended," and from there all the way back to the Old French "meller," to mix.

."Pasocon", written in katakana (to denote its loan word status) meaning PC (Personal computer) is not officially an English loan word.^ The blend of the English words 'personal computer' makes the uniquely Japanese word.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ "Pasocon", written in katakana (to denote its loan word status) meaning PC (Personal computer) is not officially an English loan word.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ "Rap" is one of those English words so old that they have acquired all sorts of meanings.

.The word does not exist in English.^ But Tolkien's lower-case words are pretty much English, though he does have a broad vocabulary: carcanet, mathom, northmost, riverward, vanishment, westering , etc.

.The blend of the English words 'personal computer' makes the uniquely Japanese word.^ The blend of the English words 'personal computer' makes the uniquely Japanese word.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ "Pasocon", written in katakana (to denote its loan word status) meaning PC (Personal computer) is not officially an English loan word.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ There are many examples of borrowed word blends in Japanese.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

"Pokémon" from the English 'Pocket' and 'Monster' is another example.[17]

Portmanteau morph

.In linguistics, the term blend is used to refer to general combination of words, and the term "portmanteau" is reserved for the narrow sense of combining two function words.^ In linguistics, the term blend is used to refer to general combination of words, and the term "portmanteau" is reserved for the narrow sense of combining two function words .
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ "Portmanteau word" is used to describe a linguistic blend , namely "a word formed by blending sounds from two or more distinct words and combining their meanings."
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ Must use 5 portmanteau words in poem .

Examples of such combination include
Language Combination Portmanteau
Portuguese de o do
a aquele àquele
de ela dela
em um num
French à le au
à les aux
de le du
de les des
German in das ins
in dem im
zu dem zum
zu der zur
Irish de an den
do an don
Spanish a el al
de el del
This usage has been referred to as "portmanteau morph".[4]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c Oxford English Dictionary, Portmanteau definition 4b, giving Carroll as first user, second usage appearing in 1882 in the Cornhill Magazine
  2. ^ a b "Portmanteau". Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/portmanteau. Retrieved 21 June 2008. 
  3. ^ "Portmanteau word". The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000. http://www.bartleby.com/61/91/P0459100.html. Retrieved 21 June 2008. 
  4. ^ a b "What is a portmanteau morph?". LinguaLinks Library. 2003. http://www.sil.org/Linguistics/GlossaryOfLinguisticTerms/WhatIsAPortmanteauMorph.htm. 
  5. ^ Thomas, David (1983), An invitation to grammar, Summer Institute of Linguistics, Bangkok: Mahidol University, p. 9 
  6. ^ Crystal, David (1985), A dictionary of linguistics and phonetics (2nd ed.), New York: Basil Blackwell, pp. 237 
  7. ^ Hartmann, R.R.K.; Stork, F.C. (1972), Dictionary of language and linguistics, London: Applied Science, pp. 180 
  8. ^ a b c Fromkin, V., Rodman, R., and Hyams, N. (2007) An Introduction to Language, Eighth Edition. Boston: Thomson Wadsworth. ISBN 1-4130-1773-8.
  9. ^ "Portmanteau". The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000.
  10. ^ Punch, 1 August 1896, 58/2
  11. ^ "J! Archive - Show 4675, aired 24 December 2004". http://www.j-archive.com/showgame.php?game_id=87&highlight=portmanteau. Retrieved 13 April 2009.  (The clue in question is located under "Double Jeopardy")
  12. ^ Zimmer, Benjamin (1 November 2005). "A perilous portmanteau?". Language Log. University of Pennsylvania. http://itre.cis.upenn.edu/~myl/languagelog/archives/002610.html. Retrieved 11 November 2008. 
  13. ^ a b c Winterman, Denise (3 August 2006). "What a mesh". BBC News Magazine. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/5239464.stm. Retrieved 17 July 2008. 
  14. ^ See p. 62 in Zuckermann, Ghil'ad, Hybridity versus Revivability: Multiple Causation, Forms and Patterns. In Journal of Language Contact, Varia 2 (2009), pp. 40-67
  15. ^ Kristján Árnason; Sigrún Helgadóttir (1991), "Terminology and Icelandic Language Policy", Behovet och nyttan av terminologiskt arbete på 90-talet, Nordterm 5, Nordterm-symposium, pp. 7-21
  16. ^ "Golput - Schott’s Vocab Blog - NYTimes.com". http://schott.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/02/17/golput/. Retrieved 19 June 2009. 
  17. ^ [www.sfu.ca/gradlings/SFUWPL/ICEAL2/Rosen_E.pdf]

1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

.PORTMANTEAU, a leather case or trunk for carrying articles.^ PORTMANTEAU, a leather case or trunk for carrying articles.

^ A bag or case, usually of leather, for carrying wearing apparel, etc., on journeys.
  • Portmanteau@Everything2.com 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: General]

^ By Portmanteau is meant any articles made of or covered in Leather or Hair, and Boxes of other Materials, Bundles, Baskets etc.

of personal use when travelling. .The typical portmanteau o; the present day has two compartments which, fastened at the back by hinges, close together like a book.^ Portmanteau Day A portmanteau is a blending of two words.
  • Oxford Village in Philadelphia, PA * Ambling Student Living 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC oxfordvillageapts.com [Source type: General]

^ (A portmanteau is a kind of suitcase with two hinged compartments.
  • The Grammarphobia Blog: Grammar, Usage, Etymology, and More: A “flustrating” question 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC www.grammarphobia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ A portmanteau is a travel bag that opens into two hinged compartments.
  • A.Word.A.Day --advertorial 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC wordsmith.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The original portmanteau (adopted from Fr.^ The original portmanteau (adopted from Fr.

^ Cite This Source Word Origin & History portmanteau 1584, "traveling case or bag for clothes and other necessaries," from M.Fr.
  • Portmanteau Definition | Definition of Portmanteau at Dictionary.com 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC dictionary.reference.com [Source type: General]

.portemanteau, porter, to carry, manteau, cloak, mantle) was a flexible round leather case to hold a cloak or other garment and of such a shape as could conveniently be carried on a rider's saddle.^ Its name came from the French porter , meaning to carry, and manteau , meaning cloak .

^ Etymology: Fr portemanteau < porter , to carry + manteau , cloak: see port & mantle .
  • portmanteau - Definition of portmanteau at YourDictionary.com 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC www.yourdictionary.com [Source type: General]

^ A portmanteau was a suitcase; according to the The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language , the word portmanteau comes from French porter , to carry + manteau , cloak (from Old French mantel , from Latin mantellum ).
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

.In French the word was also applied to a bracket or set of pegs on which to hang clothes.^ In French the word was also applied to a bracket or set of pegs on which to hang clothes.

.C. L. Dodgson ("Lewis Carroll") in Through the Looking Glass (" The Song of the Jabberwock") used the expression "portmanteau word" of an invented word composed of two words run together and supposed to convey humorously the combined meaning: thus "slithy" conveys slimy and lithe; "mimsy," flimsy and miserable.^ He has Humpty Dumpty say: “Well, slithy means lithe and slimy ...
  • Reseller News > Seeing double in the IT dictionary 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC reseller.co.nz [Source type: General]

^ The word "auditorium" also comes from the Greek, and the two have been combined in the portmanteau word "gymnatorium."
  • What is a gymnatorium, and when and where was the term originated? 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC www.funtrivia.com [Source type: General]

^ A portmanteau word refers to a word that combines the sound and meaning of two words, e.g., "smog", a combination of "smoke" and "fog"; a system that was used by Lewis Carroll in his Through the Looking Glass; as with, "slithy" as a portmanteau because "there are two meanings packed up into one word".
  • Blog, Blogs, and Blogging, Part 1 of 2 (A Blog is Another Way to Express Our Selves When Writing on the Internet). 11 January 2010 12:16 UTC www.wordinfo.info [Source type: General]



Citable sentences

Up to date as of December 27, 2010

Here are sentences from other pages on Portmanteau, which are similar to those in the above article.








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