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Potassium persulfate
Potassium persulfate
Potassium-persulfate-xtal-1997-3D-balls.png
Other names potassium peroxydisulfate
Anthion
potassium perdisulfate
Identifiers
CAS number 7727-21-1 Yes check.svgY
PubChem 24412
EC number 231-781-8
UN number 1492
RTECS number SE0400000
Properties
Molecular formula K2S2O8
Molar mass 270.322 g/mol
Appearance white powder
Density 2.477 g/cm3 [1]
Melting point

<100 °C decomp.

Solubility in water 1.75 g/100 mL (0 °C)
5.29 g/100 ml (20 ºC)
Hazards
MSDS ICSC 1133
EU Index 016-061-00-1
EU classification Oxidant (O)
Harmful (Xn)
Irritant (Xi)
R-phrases R8, R22, R36/37/38, R42/43
S-phrases (S2), S22, S24, S26, S37
NFPA 704
NFPA 704.svg
0
2
1
OX
Flash point Non-flammable
Related compounds
Other anions Potassium sulfite
Potassium sulfate
Potassium peroxymonosulfate
Other cations Sodium persulfate
 Yes check.svgY (what is this?)  (verify)
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C, 100 kPa)
Infobox references

Potassium persulfate (K2S2O8), also known as KPS, is a chemical compound.

Contents

Uses

It is a food additive and it is used in organic chemistry as an oxidizing agent for instance in the Elbs persulfate oxidation, and in hair dye substances as whitening agent with hydrogen peroxide. It takes also an important role as initiator for emulsion polymerization.

Preparation

Potassium persulfate can be prepared by electrolysis of a mixture between potassium sulfate and hydrogen sulfate at a high current density.

2 KHSO4 → K2S2O8 + H2

It can also be prepared by adding potassium hydrogen sulfate (KHSO) to an electrolyzed solution of ammonium hydrogen sulfate (NH4HSO4).

Precautions

Conditions/substances to avoid are: heat, flames, ignition sources, powdered metals, phosphorus, hydrides, organic matter, halogens, acids and alkalis.

References

  1. ^ Pradyot Patnaik. Handbook of Inorganic Chemicals. McGraw-Hill, 2002, ISBN 0070494398
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