The Full Wiki

Prato: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Did you know ...


More interesting facts on Prato

Include this on your site/blog:

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Prato
—  Comune  —
Comune di Prato
The Cathedral of Prato

Coat of arms
Prato is located in Italy
Prato
Location of Prato in Italy
Coordinates: 43°52′48″N 11°05′54″E / 43.88°N 11.09833°E / 43.88; 11.09833
Country Italy
Region Tuscany
Province Prato (PO)
Frazioni See list
Government
 - Mayor Roberto Cenni (since June 22, 2009)
Area
 - Total 97 km2 (37.5 sq mi)
Elevation 65 m (213 ft)
Population (31 July 2009)
 - Total 186,710
 - Density 1,924.8/km2 (4,985.3/sq mi)
 - Demonym Pratesi
Time zone CET (UTC+1)
 - Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)
Postal code 59100
Dialing code 0574
Patron saint St. Stephen
Saint day December 26
Website Official website
Sangallo's Santa Maria delle Carceri.
Palazzo Pretorio.

Prato About this sound listen is a city and comune in Tuscany, Italy, the capital of the Province of Prato.

Historically, Prato's economy has been based on the textile industry. The renowned Datini archives are a significant collection of late medieval documents produced between 1363 and 1410. The Textile Museum also reflects this history.

Prato is also a centre of the slow food movement, with many local specialities, including cantucci, a type of biscotti, sold by local speciality bakers.

Since the late 1950s, the city has experienced significant immigration, firstly from southern Italy, then from other nationalities, the most notable being a large Chinese community which first arrived in the late 1980s. With more than 180,000 inhabitants, Prato is Tuscany's second largest city and the third largest in Central Italy, after Rome and Florence.

Contents

History

Advertisements

Ancient age

Archaeological findings have proved that Prato's surrounding hills were inhabited since Paleolithic times. The plain was later colonized by the Etruscans. In 1998 remains of a previously unknown city from that civilization was discovered in the neighbourhood, near Campi Bisenzio: it was of medium size and it was already a centre for wool and textile industry. According to some scholars, it could be the mythical Camars. The Etruscan city was inhabited until the 5th century BC, when, for undisclosed reasons, it decayed; control of the area was later shifted to the Romans, who had their Via Cassia pass from here, but did not build any settlement.

Middle Ages

In the early Middle Ages the Byzantine and Lombard dominations followed. The history of Prato itself begins from the 10th century, when two distinct villages, Borgo al Cornio and Castrum Prati (Prato's Castle), are known. In the following century the two settlements were united under the lords of the castle, the Alberti family, who received the imperial title of Counts of Prato. In the same period the plain was dried and a hydraulic system regulating and exploiting the waters of the Bisenzio River was created to feed the gualchierae (pre-industrial textile machines).

After a siege in 1107 by the troops of Matilde of Canossa, the Alberti retreated to their family fortresses in the Bisenzio Valley: Prato could therefore develop as a free commune. Within two centuries it reached the number of 15,000 inhabitants, spurred in by the flourishing textile industry and by the presence of the Holy Belt relic. Two new lines of walls had to be built in the mid-12th century and, respectively, from the early 14th century. In 1326, in order to counter the expansionism of Florence, Prato submitted voluntarily under the seigniory of Robert of Anjou, King of Naples. However, on February 23, 1351 Joanna I of Naples sold the city to Florence in exchange of 17,500 golden florins. Prato's history therefore followed that of the former in the following centuries.

Modern age

In 1512, during the War of the League of Cambrai, the city was sacked by Spanish troops assembled by Pope Julius II and emperor Charles V to recover the nearby city of Florence for the Medici family. The severity of the sack of Prato led to the surrender of the Florentine Republic, and to the restoration of the Medici rule. The army slaughtered some 50,000 Pratesi in the streets.

In 1653 Prato obtained the status of city and became seat of a Catholic diocese. The city was embellished in particular during the 18th century.

After the unification of Italy in the 19th century, Prato became a primary industrial centre, especially in the textile sector (Italian historian Emanuele Repetti described it as the "Italian Manchester"), and population grew up to 50,000 in 1901 and to 180,000 in 2001. The town experienced a significant internal immigration; Previously part of the province of Florence, in 1992 Prato became the capital of the eponymous province.

Chinese immigration

The city of Prato has the second largest Chinese immigrant population in Italy. Legal Chinese residents in Prato on 31 December 2008 were 9,927[1]. Local authorities estimate the number of Chinese citizens living in Prato to be around 45.000, illegal immigrants included[2]. Most overseas Chinese come from the city of Wenzhou in the region of Zhejiang. Some of them have moved from Chinatown in Paris. The first Chinese people came to Prato in the early 1990s. The majority of Chinese work in the garment industry and ready-to-wear. Chinatown is located in the west part of the city, spreading to Porta Pistoiese in the historical centre. The local Chamber of Commerce registered over 3100 Chinese businesses by September 2008[3]. Most of them are located in an industrial park named Macrolotto di Iolo.

Main sights

Prato is home to many museums and other cultural monuments, including the Filippo Lippi frescoes in the Cathedral of Santo Stefano, recently restored. The Cathedral has an external pulpit by Donatello.

Palazzo Pretorio was built from the 13th century in red bricks. The part in white stone is from late-Gothic era. In the 16th century an external staircase and a watch were added. Also notable is the Palazzo Datini, built from 1383 for the merchant Francesco Datini. It has decorations by Florentine artists like Agnolo Gaddi and Niccolò Gerini. In 1409 it housed Pope Alexander V and Louis of Anjou. The Palazzo degli Alberti (12th century) is home to an art gallery with works by Filippo Lippi (Prato Madonna), Giovanni Bellini (Crucifix with Jew Cemetery) and Caravaggio (The Crowning with Thorns).

The Castello dell'Imperatore is the northernmost castle built by Frederick II of Hohenstaufen in Italy. A further major attraction of the city is the Centro per l'arte contemporanea Luigi Pecci a museum and education centre concerned with contemporary arts.

Other churches include:

  • Santa Maria delle Carceri, commissioned by Lorenzo de' Medici to Giuliano da Sangallo in 1484. It is one Greek cross plan, inspired to Brunelleschi's Pazzi Chapel. Works lasted for some twenty years. The interior is run by a bichromatic maiolica frieze by Luca della Robbia, also author of four tondos depicting the four Evangelists in the cupola. The external façade is unfinished, only the western part being completed in the 19th century according to Sangallo's design.
  • Sant'Agostino, built from 1440 over an existing edifice from 1271.
  • San Domenico (begun in 1281), with a portal from 1310.
  • San Francesco (1281-1331). It houses a notable funerary monument of Gemriniano Inghirami (died 1460), and the frescoes by Niccolò Gerini in the Migliorati Chapel.
  • San Fabiano, already existing in 1082. It houses precious traces of a pavement mosaic dating from the 9th-11th centuries. Also notable is the 15th century bell tower.
  • the late-Baroque Monastery of San Vincenzo.

Education

Higher education institutions include Il Polo Universitario "Città di Prato" (a branch of the Università degli Studi di Firenze)[4] and the Monash University Centre which is located in the Palazzo Vai.[5]

Frazioni

Prato frazioni are:

Borgonuovo, Cafaggio, Campostino, Canneto, Capezzana, Carteano, Casale, Castelnuovo, Cavagliano, Cerreto, Chiesanuova, Coiano, Figline di Prato, Filettole, Fontanelle, Galcetello, Galceti, Galciana, Gli Abatoni, Gonfienti, Grignano, I Ciliani, Il Calice, Il Cantiere, I Lecci, Il Ferro, Il Guado, Il Palco, Il Pino, Il Soccorso, Iolo, La Castellina, La Dogaia, La Macine, La Pietà, La Querce, Le Badie, Le Caserane, Le Colombaie, Le Fonti, Le Fornaci, Le Lastre, Le Pantanelle, Le Sacca, Maliseti, Mazzone, Mezzana, Narnali, Paperino, Pizzidimonte, Ponte alle Vanne, Ponzano, Popolino, Purgatorio, Reggiana, Sacra Famiglia, San Giorgio a Colonica, San Giusto, San Martino, San Paolo, Santa Cristina a Pimonte, Santa Gonda, Santa Lucia, Santa Maria a Colonica, Sant'Andrea, Sant'Ippolito, Tavola, Tobbiana, Vergaio, Viaccia, Villa Fiorita

Notable citizens

International relations

Twin towns — Sister cities

Prato is twinned with:

See also

References

External links


Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikitravel

Prato is a town in Tuscany, Italy immediately to the west of Florence. It contains a pretty duomo. The Medici villa of Poggio a Caiano, which features frescoes by Pontormo, is also within the city limits of Prato.

Understand

Prato is the low-profile cousin of Florence and Pisa in the Central Italy region of Tuscany. Not as mobbed with tourists and without the typical tourist ripoffs it is nonetheless rich with history, art, and great food. It's a great place to stay and save a few dollars while doing day trips to Pisa or Florence.

Get in

By Air

The nearest airport is Florence, however very few flights arrive in Florence. The largest nearby airport is Pisa's which many airlines serve. Getting to Prato can be tricky as the nearest large destination for most coach and train trips is Florence.

By Car

Driving in Italy is not for the faint-of-heart and Prato is no exception especially in the old center of the city where the city walls, narrow streets, and ubiquitous pedestrian zones make navigating and parking particularly difficult.

  • Don Chischotte [1] This quixotic pizzeria on Piazza Marcatale, the largest piazza in the old city, serves a wide selection of the dishes you would be looking for including a very long list of pizzas to choose from.
  • Hotel San Marco [2], Piazza San Marco, 48. +39 0574 21321 Offers reasonably priced accommodations as low as 60/night during the summer not including breakfast. Small but very comfortable rooms. In an excellent location in the old city and near most of the old buildings of Prato. Airconditioning, good free wireless.
  • ART Hotel Museo, Viale della Repubblica, 289, [3]. The Art Hotel Museo welcomes its guests with elegant and functional surroundings, only a short trip from Florence and the historic center of Prato.

Get out

This article is an outline and needs more content. It has a template, but there is not enough information present. Please plunge forward and help it grow!

1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

PRATO, a town and episcopal see of Tuscany, Italy, in the province of Florence, 1 r m. by rail N.W. of Florence, 207 ft. above sea-level. Pop. (1906), 20,197 (town); 55,298 (commune). It is situated on the Bisenzio, and is dominated by a medieval castle and surrounded by walls of the r r th and 14th centuries. The cathedral of St Stephen was begun in the 12th century in the Tuscan Romanesque style; to this period belongs the narrow nave with its wide arches; the raised transepts and the chapels were added by Giovanni Pisano in 1317-1320; the campanile dates from 1340 (it is a much smaller and less elaborate version of Giotto's campanile at Florence), while the façade, also of alternate white sandstone and green serpentine, belongs to 1413. It has a fine doorway with a bas-relief by Andrea della Robbia over it; but the most striking external feature is the lovely open-air pulpit at an angle of the building, erected by Donatello and Michelozzo for displaying to the people without risk the Virgin's girdle, brought from the Holy Land by a knight of Prato in 1130. The pulpit itself has beautiful reliefs of dancing children; beneath it is a splendid bronze capital. The contract was given out in 1428, but the work was seriously begun only in 1434 and finished in 1438. The Chapel of the Girdle has good frescoes by Agnoio Gaddi (1365), a statue of the Virgin by Giovanni Pisano, and a handsome bronze open-work screen. The frescoes in the choir, with scenes from the life of St John the Baptist and St Stephen, are by Fra Filippo Lippi (1456-1466) and are his best work; the dance of Salome and the lying in state of St Stephen are the finest of the series. Among other works of art may be mentioned the clay statue of the Madonna dell' Ulivo by Benedetto da Maiano. The massive old Palazzo Pretorio (13th century) has been somewhat modified in details; the adjacent Palazzo Comunale contains a small picture gallery 1 This combination of characters for many years Ied systematizers astray, though some of them were from the first correct in their notions as to the Pratincole's position. Linnaeus, even in his latest publication, placed it in the genus Hirundo; but the interleaved and annotated copies of his Systema naturae in the Linnean Society's library show the species marked for separation and insertion in the Order Grallae - Pratincola trachelia being the name by which he had meant to designate it in any future edition. He seems to have been induced to this change of view mainly through a specimen of the bird sent to him by John White, the brother of Gilbert White; but the opinion published in 1769 by Scopoli (Ann. I. hist. naturalis, p. 1 to) had doubtless contributed thereto, though the earlier judgment to the same effect of Brisson, as mentioned above, had been disregarded. Different erroneous assignments of the form have been made even by recent authors, who neglected the clear evidence afforded by the internal structure of the Pratincole. For instance, Sundevall in 1873 (Tentamen, p. 86) placed Glareola among the Caprimulgidae, a position which osteology shows cannot be maintained for a moment.

with works by Filippo and Filippino Lippi. A beautiful Madonna by the latter (1497) is in a small street shrine at the corner of the Via S. Margherita. The Church of S. Domenico is a Gothic edifice of 1281; that of S. Francesco has an almost Renaissance facade, fine cloisters with a good 15th-century tomb, and a chapter-house with Giottesque frescoes. The Madonna del Buon Consiglio has some good reliefs by Andrea della Robbia, by whom is also the beautiful frieze in the Madonna delle Carceri. This church, by Giuliano da Sangallo (1485-1491), is a Greek cross, with barrel vaults over the arms, and a dome; it is a fine work, and the decoration of the exterior in marble of different colours (unfinished) is of a noble simplicity. Some remains exist of the 13th-century fortress, and the large Piazza Mercatale is picturesque. The works of art visible in Prato are due, as will be seen, entirely to Florentine artists. As a whole the town has a somewhat modern aspect. The industries of Prato embrace the manufacture of woollens (the most important), straw-plaiting, biscuits, hats, macaroni, candles, silk, olive oil, clothing nd furniture, also copper and iron works, and printing.

Prato is said to be first mentioned by name in 1107, but the cathedral appears as early as 1048 as the parish church of Borgo Cornio or Santo Stefano. It was subject to the Alberti until 1180, and was then under the Imperial supremacy. It appears to have freed itself from this at the end of the 13th century. In 1313 the town acknowledged the authority of Robert, king of Naples, and in 1350 Niccola Acciajoli, seneschal of Joanna, sold it to the Florentines for 17,500 florins of gold. In 1512 it was sacked by the Spaniards under General Cardona. In 1653 it obtained the rank of city.

See E. Corradini, Prato (Bergamo, 1905).


<< Pratincole

Orson Pratt >>


Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

See also prato

Contents

English

Proper noun

Singular
Prato

Plural
-

Prato

Wikipedia-logo.png
Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

  1. Province of Tuscany, Italy.
  2. Capital of the province of Prato.

Translations

Anagrams


French

Proper noun

Prato

  1. Prato (province)
  2. Prato (city)

Anagrams

  • Anagrams of aoprt
  • porta

Italian

Wikipedia-logo.png
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Prato

Wikipedia it

Proper noun

Prato f.

  1. Prato (province)
  2. Prato (town)

Derived terms

Anagrams


Simple English

[[File:|thumb|The Cathedral of Prato.]] Prato is a city in Tuscany, Italy. It is the capital of the Province of Prato.

Prato's economy has been based upon the textile industry, since 1400. Prato is also a centre of the slow food movement, with many other local specialities, including cantucci, a type of biscotti.

Since the late 1950s, the city has had a big amount of immigration, first from southern Italy, then other countries. Since the late 1980s a large Han community has settled in the city. With a population of more than 180,000 people, Prato is Tuscany's second largest city. It is the third largest in Central Italy, after Rome and Florence.

Contents

History

In 1512 the city was attacked by the Spanish troops sent by Pope Julius II to capture the nearby city of Florence for the Medici family. The attack caused much damage to Prato. It led to the surrender of the Florentine Republic and control by the Medici family. The army killed 50,600 citizens of Prato in the streets.

Main monuments

File:Palazzo pretorio
Palazzo Pretorio.
File:Prato, Santa Maria delle
Sangallo's Santa Maria delle Carceri.

Prato is home to many museums and other cultural monuments. These include the Filippo Lippi frescoes in the Cathedral of Santo Stefano which has been restored in 2006 [1]. The Cathedral has an external pulpit by Donatello.

Palazzo Pretorio, the old town hall, was built at the end of the 13th century in red bricks. Sections in white brick were added later. In the 16th century an outside staircase and a clock were added. Also notable is the Palazzo Datini, the home of the merchant Francesco Datini built from 1383. It has decorations by Florentine artists like Agnolo Gaddi and Niccolò Gerini. In 1409, it housed Pope Alexander V and Louis of Anjou. The Palazzo degli Alberti (12th century) is home to an artgallery with works by Filippo Lippi (Prato Madonna), Giovanni Bellini (Crucifix with Jew Cemetery) and Caravaggio (The Crowning with Thorns).

Another major attraction of the city is the Centro per l'arte contemporanea Luigi Pecci, a museum and education centre concerned with contemporary arts.

Churches in Prato include:

  • Santa Maria delle Carceri, wanted by Lorenzo de' Medici to Giuliano da Sangallo in 1484.*Sant'Agostino, built from 1440 over an existing edifice from 1271.
  • San Domenico (begun in 1281), with a portal from 1310.
  • San Francesco (1281-1331). It houses a notable funerary monument of Gemriniano Inghirami (died in 1460)
  • San Fabiano, already existing in 1082. Houses rich of precious traces of a pavement mosaic dating from the 9th-11th centuries.

Prato is also the home of the Monash University a very nice centre for learning English.

Notable citizens

  • Nicolo Albertini, cardinal, in the 1200s
  • Francesco Datini, merchant in the 1300s,
  • Filippino Lippi, painter in the 1500s
  • Lorenzo Bartolini, sculptor, 1777-1850
  • Curzio Malaparte, writer, 1898-1957
  • Fiorenzo Magni, cyclist, 1920-
  • Roberto Benigni, actor and director (born near Arezzo but he used to live in Prato with the family.)
  • Jury Chechi, gymnast, olympic gold medalist
  • Domenico Zipoli, composer, 1688-1726
  • Paolo Rossi, soccer player, World Champion, European Footballer of the Year and World Player of the Year in 1982
  • Christian Vieri, soccer player

Sister cities

References

Others websites


Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message