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R-1340 Wasp
A preserved Pratt & Whitney R-1340
Type Radial engine
National origin United States
Manufacturer Pratt & Whitney
First run 29 December 1925

The Pratt & Whitney R-1340 Wasp was a reciprocating engine widely used in American aircraft from the 1920s onward. It was the company's first engine, and the first of the famed Wasp family.[1] It was a single-row, nine-cylinder air-cooled radial design, and displaced 1,344 in³ (22 L); bore and stroke were both 5.75 in (146.05 mm). A total of 34,966 engines were produced.[2]

Contents

Variants

  • R-1340-7 — 450 hp (336 kW), 600 hp (447 kW)
  • R-1340-8 — 425 hp (317 kW)
  • R-1340-9 — 450 hp (336 kW), 525 hp (391 kW)
  • R-1340-16 — 550 hp (410 kW)
  • R-1340-17 — 525 hp (391 kW)
  • R-1340-19 — 600 hp (447 kW)
  • R-1340-19F — 600 hp (447 kW)
  • R-1340-21G — 550 hp (410 kW)
  • R-1340-22 — 550 hp (410 kW)
  • R-1340-23 — 575 hp (429 kW)
  • R-1340-30 — 550 hp (410 kW)
  • R-1340-31 — 550 hp (410 kW)
  • R-1340-33 — 600 hp (447 kW)
  • R-1340-48 — 600 hp (447 kW)
  • R-1340-49 — 600 hp (447 kW)
  • R-1340-AN1 — 550 hp (410 kW), 600 hp (447 kW)
  • R-1340-B — 450 hp (336 kW)
  • R-1340-D — 500 hp (373 kW)
  • R-1340-S1H1G — 550 hp (410 kW)
  • R-1340-S3H1 — 600 hp (447 kW)

Applications

Specifications (R-1340-S3HI)

Data from [3]

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General characteristics

  • Type: Nine-cylinder single-row supercharged air-cooled radial engine
  • Bore: 5.75 in (146 mm)
  • Stroke: 5.75 in (146 mm)
  • Displacement: 1,343.8 in3 (22.02 l)
  • Length: 44.06 in (1,119 mm)
  • Diameter: 51.38 in (1,305 mm)
  • Dry weight: 805 lb (365 kg)

Components

Performance

See also

References

Notes

  1. ^ Gunston 1989, p.114.
  2. ^ Pratt&Whitney R-1340 page Retrieved: 25 October 2008
  3. ^ Tsygulev (1939). Aviacionnye motory voennykh vozdushnykh sil inostrannykh gosudarstv (Russian: Авиационные моторы военных воздушных сил иностранных государств). Moscow: Gosudarstvennoe voennoe izdatelstvo Narkomata Oborony Soyuza SSR. http://base13.glasnet.ru/text/aviamotory/t.htm. 

Bibliography

  • Gunston, Bill. World Encyclopedia of Aero Engines. Cambridge, England. Patrick Stephens Limited, 1989. ISBN 1-85260-163-9

External links


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