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Preveza
Πρέβεζα
Location
Preveza is located in Greece
Preveza
Coordinates 38°57′N 20°44′E / 38.95°N 20.733°E / 38.95; 20.733Coordinates: 38°57′N 20°44′E / 38.95°N 20.733°E / 38.95; 20.733
Government
Country: Greece
Periphery: Epirus
Prefecture: Preveza
Population statistics (as of 2001[1])
City
 - Population: 19,605
 - Area: 66.8 km2 (26 sq mi)
 - Density: 293 /km2 (760 /sq mi)
Other
Time zone: EET/EEST (UTC+2/3)
Elevation (center): 10 m (33 ft)
Postal: 481 00
Telephone: 26820
Auto: ΡΖ
Website
http://www.dimosprevezas.gr

Preveza (Greek: Πρέβεζα) is a town in northwestern Greece, located at the mouth of the Ambracian Gulf. It is the capital of Preveza Prefecture, which is part of the periphery of Epirus. An undersea tunnel, which runs between Preveza and Aktio of Acarnania (see Actium), connects the town to western Aetolia in Aetolia-Acarnania. The ruins of the ancient city of Nicopolis lie 5 km north of the city.

Contents

History

Preveza's promenade
The Cathedral's tower of Preveza

Preveza was founded in 290 BC as Berenikia by Pyrrhus, King of Epirus.[2] It is site of the Battle of Actium, in which Augustus' forces defeated those of Mark Antony and Cleopatra. Nicopolis ("victory city") was built nearby to commemorate Augustus' victory. It continued under Roman and later Byzantine rule, experiencing brief periods of Bulgarian rule in the 10th century (920-922, 977-983, 996-997). After 1204, it came under the Despotate of Epirus (1204-1230, 1241-1338, 1356-1358), the Second Bulgarian Empire (1230-1241), the Serbian Empire (1348-1356), and the Despotate of Arta (1358-1401). It then came under Venetian rule until captured by the Ottomans in 1499.

Under the Ottomans, it was known as Preveze, and was the capital of the Karlı İli sanjak (derived from Carlo II Tocco, Despot of Epirus) which comprised Aetolia-Acarnania), initially as part of the vilayet of Rumelia (1499-1670) and afterwards of the vilayet of Yanya (Ioannina). The Battle of Preveza was fought off its shore in 1538, where the Ottoman fleet of Hayreddin Barbarossa defeated a united Christian fleet under Andrea Doria. Ottoman rule was interrupted twice by periods of Venetian control, during the Morean War (1684-1699) and from 1717 to 1797. At the Treaty of Campo Formio, it was ceded to France, but was abandoned to the forces of the local Ottoman governor, Ali Pasha, in 1798. It remained under Ottoman control until captured by the Greek Army on 3 November 1912, during the First Balkan War. Along with the rest of Greece, it was occupied by Italy (1941-1943) and Germany (1943-1944) during World War II.

Subdivisions

Municipal districts

  • Flambouri
  • Michalitsi
    • Agios Nikolaos
  • Mytika
  • Nikopoli
    • Mazoma

Historical population

Year Population Change Municipal population Change Density
1981 13,624 - - - -/km²
1991 13,341 -283/-21.21% 16,886 - 252.78/km²
2001 16,321 2,980/22.34% 19,605 2,719/16.1% 293/km²

International relations

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Twin towns - Sister cities

Preveza is a founding member of the Douzelage, a town twinning association of 23 towns across the European Union. This active town twinning began in 1991 and there are regular events, such as a produce market from each of the other countries and festivals.[3][4]

Other twinnings

See also

References

  1. ^ "Δείτε τη Διοικητική Διαίρεση" (in Greek). Hellenic Interior Ministry. www.ypes.gr. http://www.ypes.gr/UserFiles/f0ff9297-f516-40ff-a70e-eca84e2ec9b9/D_diairesi.xls. Retrieved 2009-09-09.  
  2. ^ http://www.grecian.net/ellada/en/epirus/preveza.aspx Prefecture of Preveza
  3. ^ "Douzelage.org: Home". www.douzelage.org. http://www.douzelage.org/. Retrieved 2009-10-21.  
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w "Douzelage.org: Member Towns". www.douzelage.org. http://www.douzelage.org/index.php?id=15. Retrieved 2009-10-21.  

External links


Preveza
Πρέβεζα
File:Preveza Greece from above
Preveza from the air. The cape of Actium and the airport can be seen in the lower left.
Location

Preveza
Coordinates 38°57′N 20°44′E / 38.95°N 20.733°E / 38.95; 20.733Coordinates: 38°57′N 20°44′E / 38.95°N 20.733°E / 38.95; 20.733
Government
Country:Greece
Periphery: Epirus
Prefecture: Preveza
Population statistics (as of 2001[1])
City
 - Population: 19,605
 - Area: 66.8 km2 (26 sq mi)
 - Density: 293 /km2 (760 /sq mi)
Other
Time zone: EET/EEST (UTC+2/3)
Elevation (center): 10 m (33 ft)
Postal: 481 00
Telephone: 26820
Auto: ΡΖ
Website
http://www.dimosprevezas.gr

Preveza (Greek: Πρέβεζα) is a town in the periphery of Epirus, northwestern Greece, located at the mouth of the Ambracian Gulf. It is the capital of Preveza Prefecture, which is part of the periphery of Epirus. An undersea tunnel, which runs between Preveza and Aktio of Acarnania (see Actium), connects the town to western Aetolia in Aetolia-Acarnania. The ruins of the ancient city of Nicopolis lie 5 km north of the city.

Contents

Etymology

The name Preveza is of uncertain etymology. It might come from Slavic prevoz meaning "crossing, passage" but its form might point towards an Albanian intermediary prevëzë, itself derived perhaps from the Slavic word.[2]

History

Ancient

File:Cathedral tower in Preveza,
The Cathedral's tower of Preveza.
File:Preveza
View of Preveza, 1900.
File:Promenade of Preveza,
View of the promenade.

In antiquity, the area of Preveza was inhabited by the Greek tribe of the Thesprotians. Near the site of modern Preveza in 290 BC Pyrrhus of Epirus founded the town of Berenikia after his mother-in-law Berenice I of Egypt.[3] The Ambracian Gulf near Berenikia was the site of the Battle of Actium, in which Augustus' forces defeated those of Mark Antony and Cleopatra. Nicopolis ("victory city") was built nearby to commemorate Augustus' victory.

Medieval

Nicopolis continued under Roman and later Byzantine rule, experiencing brief periods of Bulgarian rule in the 10th century (920-922, 977-983, 996-997). According to one theory, modern Preveza grew around a military outpost built in the 9th century by the Bulgarians, following their conquest of Nicopolis.[4] The city was first attested in the Chronicle of Morea (1292),[5] however Hammond places the foundation of Preveza much later, at the end of 14th century, possibly by Albanians.[6] After 1204, it came under the Despotate of Epirus (1204–1230, 1241–1338, 1356–1358), the Second Bulgarian Empire (1230–1241), the Serbian Empire (1348–1356), and the Despotate of Arta (1358–1401). It then came under Venetian rule until captured by the Ottomans.

Ottoman

Preveza was refounded by the Ottomans in the late 15th century, with a subsequent strengthening of the fortifications (1495).[7] During Ottoman rule, it was the capital of the Karlı İli sanjak (derived from Carlo II Tocco, Despot of Epirus) which comprised Aetolia-Acarnania), initially as part of the vilayet of Rumelia (1499–1670) and afterwards of the vilayet of Yanya (Ioannina). The Battle of Preveza was fought off its shore in 1538, where the Ottoman fleet of Hayreddin Barbarossa defeated a united Christian fleet under Andrea Doria. Ottoman rule was interrupted twice by periods of Venetian control, during the Morean War (1684–1699) and from 1717 to 1797. At the end of the 18th century Preveza became a transit center of trade that resulted in the increase of its population, to approximately 10,000.[8] At the Treaty of Campo Formio, it was ceded to France. The prosperity came to an end when at 1798 troops of the local Ottoman governor Ali Pasha attacked and finally conquered Preveza and major slaughter occurred against the French troops and the local Greek population that defended the city.[9]

According to the treaty of Berlin in 1878 Preveza was to be ceded to the Kingdom of Greece by the Ottoman Empire. The local Albanian Committee of Preveza, a committee of the League of Prizren, under the leadership of Abedin Dino, one of the founders of the League, opposed the decision.[10][11] In January 1879, 400 Albanian representatives gathered in Preveza to attend an assembly organized by the League of Prizren and its local committee. A month later on February 28, 1879 forty-nine delegates representing the Albanian population of the Ottoman Empire signed a petition in Preveza arguing that if Preveza was awarded to the Kingdom of Greece, they would fight to prevent its annexation and eventually the city wasn't ceded to the Kingdom of Greece.[12] After the final delineation of the borders, the Ottoman empire changed the governor of Preveza and appointed one from Gjirokastër in order to deal with the spreading nationalist activities of the Albanian population of Preveza led by Abdyl Frashëri.[13]

Modern

The city remained under Ottoman control until captured by the Greek Army on 3 November 1912, during the First Balkan War. It formally joined Greece along with the rest of southern Epirus per the Treaty of London. Along with the rest of Greece, it was occupied by Italy (1941–1943) and Germany (1943–1944) during World War II. Today Preveza is a commercial harbor and tourist hub, benefiting from its proximity to the nearby Aktion National Airport and the nearby island of Lefkada, a major tourist destination. The Aktio-Preveza Undersea Tunnel, an important work of infrastructure for what has traditionally been a remote and underdeveloped region, was inaugurated in 2002 and links Preveza to Actium (Greek: Άκτιο, Aktio) on the southern shore of the Ambracian Gulf, greatly shortening the distance of the trip to Lefkada.

Notable people from Preveza

Landmarks

Municipal districts

  • Flampoura
  • Michalitsi (Michalitsi, Agios Nikolaos)
  • Mytikas
  • Nikopoli (Nikopoli, Mazoma)
  • Preveza (Preveza, Agios Thomas, Kalamitsi, Neochori, Psathaki)

Transportation

Preveza is linked by road to Igoumenitsa and other coastal settlements through the E55 national road, and is also linked with other cities in Epirus such as Ioannina and Arta. The Aktio-Preveza Undersea Tunnel links Preveza by road to Aetolia-Acarnania in Central Greece. Preveza also has a small commercial and passenger port and is served by the nearby Aktion National Airport, which also serves the island of Lefkada.

Historical population

Year Town population Municipality population
1981 13,624 -
1991 13,341 16,886
2001 16,321 19,605

International relations

Twin towns - Sister cities

Preveza is a founding member of the Douzelage, a town twinning association of 23 towns across the European Union. This active town twinning began in 1991 and there are regular events, such as a produce market from each of the other countries and festivals.[14][15]

Other twinnings

See also

References

Notes
  1. ^ "Δείτε τη Διοικητική Διαίρεση" (in Greek). Hellenic Interior Ministry. www.ypes.gr. http://www.ypes.gr/UserFiles/f0ff9297-f516-40ff-a70e-eca84e2ec9b9/D_diairesi.xls. Retrieved 2009-09-09. 
  2. ^ Max Vasmer, Die Slaven in Griechenland, 1970 (reprint), p. 64 "Preveza"
  3. ^ Green, Peter (1993). Alexander to Actium: the historical evolution of the Hellenistic age. Hellenistic culture and society. University of California Press. p. 123. ISBN 0520083490. http://books.google.com/books?id=1QOvJ14Jxv8C&pg=RA2-PA123&dq=Preveza+Pyrrhus&hl=en&cd=5#v=onepage&q=Preveza%20Pyrrhus&f=false. 
  4. ^ Guide Bleu, Greece. Hachette-Livre, 2000. p.680
  5. ^ Isager Jacob. Foundation and destruction, Nikopolis and Northwestern Greece. Danish Institute at Athens, 2001, ISBN 9788772887340, p. 47.
  6. ^ Hammond, Nicholas Geoffrey (1967). Epirus: The Geography, The Ancient Remains, The History and the Topography of Epirus and Adjacent Areas. Oxford University Press. p. 46. http://books.google.com/books?cd=8&hl=en&id=kEFoAAAAMAAJ&dq=Preveza+name&q=The+name+is+probably+from+the+Albanian+word+preveze,+meaning#search_anchor. Retrieved 2010-06-10. 
  7. ^ Isager Jacob. Foundation and destruction, Nikopolis and Northwestern Greece. Danish Institute at Athens, 2001, ISBN 9788772887340, p. 60.
  8. ^ Mikropoulos A. Tassos.Elevating and Safeguarding Culture Using Tools of the Information Society: Dusty traces of the Muslim culture. Earthlab. ISBN 9789602331873, p. 313-315.
  9. ^ Fleming Katherine Elizabeth. The Muslim Bonaparte: diplomacy and orientalism in Ali Pasha's Greece. Princeton University Press, 1999. ISBN 978-0-691-00194-4, p. 99
  10. ^ Jelavich, Barbara (1989). History of the Balkans: Eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The Joint Committee on Eastern Europe Publication Series. Cambridge University Press. p. 365. ISBN 0521274583. http://books.google.com/books?id=qR4EeOrTm-0C&pg=PA365&dq=Prevesa+Albanian+committees&hl=en&ei=aKM_TLiECtWVONOq1JoH&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=2&ved=0CDcQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=Prevesa%20Albanian%20committees&f=false. 
  11. ^ Skendi, Stavro (1967). The Albanian national awakening, 1878-1912. Princeton University Press. p. 70. http://books.google.com/books?ei=BhhATJPuLIyOjAfareUG&ct=result&hl=en&id=LCKFAAAAIAAJ&dq=committee+Preveza+Albanian&q=Preveza#search_anchor. 
  12. ^ Gawrych, George (2006). The crescent and the eagle: Ottoman rule, Islam and the Albanians, 1874-1913. I.B.Tauris. pp. 54. ISBN 1845112873. http://books.google.com/books?id=wPOtzk-unJgC&pg=PA68&dq=preveze+albanian&hl=en&ei=p_1LTOPrM52hsQbRkujlDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CCkQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=preveze%20february%201879&f=false. 
  13. ^ Ortayli, İlber (1998). Belleten. Belleten. 62. Türk Tarih Kurumu. p. 153. http://books.google.com/books?id=b6FpAAAAMAAJ&q=In+fact+it+seems+that+Albanian+nationalism+was+rampant+among+local+Albanians.+A+new+mutasarr%C4%B1f+was+appointed+to+Prevesa+from+Argiri+(Ergiri)+to+curb+the+agitation+caused+by+one+Abdul+Bey+and+his+confederate&dq=In+fact+it+seems+that+Albanian+nationalism+was+rampant+among+local+Albanians.+A+new+mutasarr%C4%B1f+was+appointed+to+Prevesa+from+Argiri+(Ergiri)+to+curb+the+agitation+caused+by+one+Abdul+Bey+and+his+confederate&hl=en&ei=hNOlTMW3A8rNswaNyMGpCA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CCUQ6AEwAA. Retrieved 3 October 2010. 
  14. ^ "Douzelage.org: Home". www.douzelage.org. http://www.douzelage.org/. Retrieved 2009-10-21. 
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w "Douzelage.org: Member Towns". www.douzelage.org. http://www.douzelage.org/index.php?id=15. Retrieved 2009-10-21. 

External links


1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

PREVEZA, or Prevesa, a seaport of Albania, European Turkey, in the vilayet of Iannina; at the entrance to the Gulf of Arta, an inlet of the Ionian Sea. Pop. (1905), 6500, of whom about four-fifths are Christian Albanians or Greeks, and onefifth Moslems. The town is surrounded by dense olive groves, and most of its houses stand in their own gardens. The harbour is small, and closed to large vessels by a bar of sand; but it is a port of call for the Austrian Lloyd steamers, and annually accommodates about 1500 small vessels, the majority of which are engaged in the coasting trade. Preveza exports dairy produce, valonia, hides and wool, olives and olive oil. The yearly value of its trade varies from about £70,000 to £80,000. About 3 m. north are the ruins of Nicopolis.


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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

Contents

English

Pronunciation

Pre·ve·za

Proper noun

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Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Singular
Preveza

Plural
-

Preveza

  1. A city in Greece located in the Preveza prefecture.

Translations


Simple English

Preveza is a Greek town. It is located in the west of Greece in the district of Ipirus. Preveza is the capital of Preveza prefecture. Preveza is a coastal town and it has a big port. Its ports connect Preveza with Ionian Island such as Leukada and Paxoi. Near Preveza is the Arta town.


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