The Full Wiki

More info on Private bank

Private bank: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Did you know ...


More interesting facts on Private bank

Include this on your site/blog:

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Banking
B&O RR common stock.jpg

Finance
Financial markets
Financial market participants
Corporate finance
Personal finance
Public finance
Banks and Banking
Financial regulation

Types of Bank
Central bank
Advising bank
Commercial bank
Community development bank
Credit union
Custodian bank
Depository bank
Investment bank
Industrial bank
Islamic banking
Merchant bank
Mutual bank
Mutual savings bank
National bank
Offshore bank
Private bank
Savings bank
Sparkasse
Swiss bank

Banking terms
Anonymous banking
Automatic teller machine
Deposit
Loan
Money creation
Substitute check

List of banks
List of banks and credit unions in Canada
List of banks in Hong Kong
List of banks in Singapore
List of banks in Pakistan

Private banks are banks that are not incorporated. A private bank is owned by either an individual or a general partner(s) with limited partner(s). In any such case, the creditors can look to both the "entirety of the bank's assets" as well as the entirety of the sole-proprietor's/general-partners' assets.

These banks have a long tradition in Switzerland, dating back to at least the revocation of the Edict of Nantes (1685). However most have now become incorporated companies, so the term is rarely true anymore. There are a few private banks remaining in the U.S. One is Brown Brothers Harriman & Co., a general partnership with about 30 members. This is also true of private banks in Europe, and reputable old private banks such as the Swiss Bank Hottinger & Cie founded in 1786 are truly hard to find.

"Private banks" and "private banking" can also refer to non-government owned banks in general, in contrast to government-owned (or nationalized) banks, which were prevalent in communist, socialist and some social democratic ("liberal") states in the 20th century. Private banks as a form of organization should also not be confused with "Private Banks" that offer financial services to high net worth individuals and others.

See also

Advertisements

Banking

Types of bank
Central bank
Advising bank
Commercial bank
Community development bank
Credit union
Custodian bank
Depository bank
German public bank
Investment bank
Industrial bank
Islamic banking
Merchant bank
Mutual bank
Mutual savings bank
National bank
Offshore bank
Private bank
Savings bank
Swiss bank

Deposit accounts
Savings account
Transactional account
Money market account
Time deposit

ATM card
Debit card
Credit card

Electronic funds transfer
Automated Clearing House
Electronic bill payment
Giro
Wire transfer

Banking terms
Anonymous banking
Automatic teller machine
Loan
Money creation
Substitute check

List of banks


Finance series
Financial market
Financial market participants
Corporate finance
Personal finance
Public finance
Banks and Banking
Financial regulation

 [[Template:FULLPAGENAME: Banking|v]]  [[{{TALKPAGENAME:Template:FULLPAGENAME: Banking}}|d]]  [{{fullurl:Template:FULLPAGENAME: Banking|action=edit}}e] 

Private banks are banks that are not incorporated. A private bank is owned by either an individual or a general partner(s) with limited partner(s). In any such case, the creditors can look to both the "entirety of the bank's assets" as well as the entirety of the sole-proprietor's/general-partners' assets.

These banks have a long tradition in Switzerland, dating back to at least the revocation of the Edict of Nantes (1685). However most have now become incorporated companies, so the term is rarely true anymore. There are a few private banks remaining in the U.S. One is Brown Brothers Harriman & Co., a general partnership with about 30 members.

"Private banks" and "private banking" can also refer to non-government owned banks in general, in contrast to government-owned (or nationalized) banks, which were prevalent in communist, socialist and some social democratic states in the 20th century. Private banks as a form of organization should also not be confused with "Private Banks" that offer financial services to high net worth individuals and others.

References

See also


Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message