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Psychedelic music
Stylistic origins rock and roll, free jazz, folk music, hindustani music, ambient music, electronic music, musique concrete
Cultural origins mid 1960s, USA and UK
Typical instruments drums, guitar, bass guitar, keyboards, tape loops, found objects, various Indian instruments
Mainstream popularity c. 1965-1971
Derivative forms Progressive rock
Space rock
Subgenres
Psychedelic rock - Psychedelic folk - Psychedelic pop - Psychedelic soul - Psychedelic ambient - Psychedelic trance - Psychedelic techno - Psychedelic breakbeat - Psychedelic rap

Psychedelic music covers a range of popular music styles, genres and scenes, that may include psychedelic rock, psychedelic folk, psychedelic pop, psychedelic soul, psychedelic ambient, psychedelic trance, and others. Psychedelic rock is also commonly called acid rock. Psychedelic music can occur in almost every genre of music, including classical Western art music.

Contents

Background

The first era of psychedelic music began in the 1960s as a subgenre of the rock and roll movement combining elements of rock, electronic music, eastern influences - particularly sitars, and other diverse elements. It was inspired by the growing mainstream use of mind altering drugs like cannabis, psilocybin, and especially LSD, which was still legal for the first half of the psychedelic era.

In 1965-1967, The Beatles recorded and released to the public some of the first psychedelic rock, with tracks like "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds" and "Tomorrow Never Knows" to name just two. These songs used Their innovations included Eastern influences, rare instruments, early electronic sampling machines, prototypical electronic instruments, backwards guitars, backwards cymbal hits, but of course, were not strictly limited to psychedelic rock. However, contemporaries of the Beatles such as Cream and then later, Pink Floyd, utilized the idea of psychedelia fully in all of their music, to become two of the first popularly known psychedelic bands. Thus began psychedelic rock which led into the first psychedelic era of rock and roll (1966-1968), in which this music was both popular and was highly sought after. During this period, even mainstream commercials depicted allusions to psychedelic drug use and effects.

The First Psychedelic Era (1966-1968)

Following the success of The Beatles, Cream and Pink Floyd, came a flood of psychedelic music. Even the Rolling Stones paid homage to the Beatles' acknowledgment of psychedelia, by releasing their one and only psychedelic album, "Their Satanic Majesties Request", in a tribute to them. The Grateful Dead were used in the Acid Tests beginning in late December of 1965, and developed a jam band approach to psychedelia as a result of playing live to experimenters on LSD. Jerry Garcia cited the Beatles' "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band" as being a pinnacle of inspiration for psychedelic music. As did Professor Timothy Leary, also known as the "guru of LSD", who went around college campuses in 1967 giving lectures about using psychedelic music to explore the mind, using this Beatles album as the best example. He touted the use of the "Sgt. Pepper's..." album for promoting experimentation with LSD at home, while encouraging kids to turn on, tune in, drop out.

Psychedelic music could also be interpreted as simply a "surreal and dreamy feeling" in a particular song, instead of a specific genre with rules to follow. Even mainstream artists released psychedelic-tinged songs, and an example of this was "The Rain, The Park and Other Things" by The Cowsills, a family-oriented band. It featured psychedelic effects and urban psychedelic phrases that were coined and used during this time, such as referring to "blowing the mind".

Another hit psychedelic song from the first era was, "Itchycoo Park" by The Small Faces, which also refers to blowing one's mind after arriving at the park. It is psychedelic music because this, and because of the phasing effects used, on the vocals and instruments, as part of the hook of the song. "Hole in My Shoe" by Traffic is also one of the defining tracks of psychedelic rock and became a classic in its own right.

Methods of Recording Psychedelic Music

In 1966, Country Joe And The Fish soberly wrote, and recorded the song "Bass Strings". It was originally a raw, and offensive protest song in the jug-band style. In 1967, the height of the first psychedelic music era and the intertwined Summer Of Love, they re-recorded the song under the influence of the then-legal LSD as an experiment to see how it would turn out. The song changed dramatically, and the new result was clearly self-evident. On Country Joe's first studio album ("Electric Music for the Mind and Body") the re-recorded version of the song "Bass Strings" featured a much slower tempo, delayed vocals, added reverb, studio reversed cymbals, electric organ, desert traveler lyrics, and a continuous blues guitar solo.

The Jefferson Airplane website states that (the album), "After Bathing at Baxter's" was the group's attempt to capture what the psychedelic experience sounded and felt like to them from the inside." Jimi Hendrix is also renowned for his talent and guitar virtuosity being able to emulate the psychedelic experience.

Neo-psychedelic music

Related musical genres

See also

Bibliography

  • Joynson, Vernon (December 1984). The Acid Trip: A Complete Guide to Psychedelic Music. Babylon Books. ISBN 0-9071-8824-9. 
  • Sculatti, Gene; Davin Seay (April 1985). San Francisco Nights: The Psychedelic Music Trip, 1965-1968. St Martins Pr. p. 192. ISBN 0-3126-9903-4. 

Eye Mind:The Saga of The 13th Floor Elevators, Pioneers of the Psychedelic Sound by Paul Drummond Process Media 2007 isbn0-978-0-9760822-6-2 |424 pages

References and notes


Simple English

Psychedelic Music
Stylistic origins rock and roll, jazz, folk music
Cultural origins Psychedelic drug use
Typical instruments drums, guitar, bass guitar, keyboards, tape loops, found objects, various Indian instruments
Mainstream popularity c. 1965-1967, later evolved into progressive rock
Subgenres
Psychedelic rock - Psychedelic folk - Psychedelic pop - Psychedelic soul - Psychedelic ambient - Psychedelic trance - Psychedelic techno - Psychedelic breakbeat

Psychedelic music is a word talking about many different music styles and genres, such as psychedelic rock, psychedelic folk, psychedelic pop, psychedelic soul, psychedelic ambient, psychedelic trance, psychedelic techno, and others. Many people use the words acid rock to talk about psychedelic rock. Psychedelic music can happen in almost every kind of music, even classical Western art music.








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