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Pythagoras (Πυθαγόρας)

Bust of Pythagoras of Samos in the Capitoline Museums, Rome
Full name Pythagoras (Πυθαγόρας)
Born c. 570 BC
Samos Island
Died c. 495 BC
Metapontum
Era Pre-Socratic philosophy
Region Pythagoras
School Pythagoreanism
Main interests Metaphysics, Music, Mathematics, Ethics, Politics
Notable ideas Musica universalis, Golden ratio, Pythagorean tuning, Pythagorean theorem
.Pythagoras of Samos (Greek: Ὁ Πυθαγόρας ὁ Σάμιος, O Pythagoras o Samios, "Pythagoras the Samian", or simply Ὁ Πυθαγόρας; c.^ Burkert begins his treatise on this enigmatic philosopher writing that ‘Over the origins of Greek philosophy and science lies the shadow of a great traditional name’, [1] that is: Pythagoras of Samos (c.
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^ Pythagoras        Pythagoras of Samos , c.560-c.480 BC, was a Greek philosopher and religious leader who was responsible for important developments in the history of mathematics, astronomy, and the theory of music.
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570-c. .495 BC[1]) was an Ionian Greek philosopher and founder of the religious movement called Pythagoreanism.^ Pythagoras        Pythagoras of Samos , c.560-c.480 BC, was a Greek philosopher and religious leader who was responsible for important developments in the history of mathematics, astronomy, and the theory of music.
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^ Ponticus, Heracleides      The Greek philosopher Heracleides Ponticus (Heraclides of Pontus), c.390-310 BC, was one of the first to propose that the Earth rotates on its axis.
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.Most of our information about Pythagoras was written down centuries after he lived, thus very little reliable information is known about him.^ Unfortunately we can say little more about the details of Pythagoras' conception of the soul or of metempsychosis.
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^ Thus, not only is Pythagoras not commonly known as a geometer in the time of Plato and Aristotle, but also the most authoritative history of early Greek geometry assigns him no role in the history of geometry at all.
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^ This fragment shows only that Pythagoras read the writings of others, however, and says nothing about him writing something of his own.
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.He was born on the island of Samos, and may have travelled widely in his youth, visiting Egypt and other places seeking knowledge.^ He was born in Samos and traveled widely.
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^ There are a number of reports that he traveled widely in the Near East while living on Samos, e.g., to Babylonia, Phoenicia and Egypt.
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.Around 530 BC, he moved to Croton, a Greek colony in southern Italy, and there set up a religious sect.^ BCE. He then emigrated to the Greek city of Croton in southern Italy ca.
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^ BC. He then emigrated to the Greek city of Croton in southern Italy ca.
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^ Accounts report that Pythagoras made one or more visits there and to Krete in order to study their laws before journeying to southern Italy, where he settled in Kroton around 530 BCE, and later in the Lakonian colony of Taras.
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.His followers pursued the religious rites and practices developed by Pythagoras, and studied his philosophical theories.^ Hamilton published many papers developing the theory of quaternions, including a paper "On Quaternions, or on a New System of Imaginaries in Algebra," published in installments in the Philosophical Magazine between 1844 and 1850.
  • The Math Book: From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension, 250 Milestones in the History of Mathematics 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC sprott.physics.wisc.edu [Source type: Academic]

The society took an active role in the politics of Croton, but this eventually led to their downfall. .The Pythagorean meeting-places were burned, and Pythagoras was forced to flee the city.^ Harmonics, Music, Pythagoras and the Universe Harmonics, Music, Pythagoras and the Universe The following is text has been produced with permission of the participants from conversations that took place in the group Alexandria City in August 1996.
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He is said to have ended his days in Metapontum.
.Pythagoras made influential contributions to philosophy and religious teaching in the late 6th century BC. He is often revered as a great mathematician, mystic and scientist, and he is best known for the Pythagorean theorem which bears his name.^ This dissection is often attributed to the 17 th century Dutch mathematician Frans van Schooten.
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^ By the end of the first century BCE, a large collection of books had been forged in the name of Pythagoras and other early Pythagoreans, which purported to be the original Pythagorean texts from which Plato and Aristotle derived their most important ideas.
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^ The late Professor Edsger W. Dijkstra found an absolutely stunning generalization of the Pythagorean theorem.
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.However, because legend and obfuscation cloud his work even more than with the other pre-Socratic philosophers, one can say little with confidence about his teachings, and some have questioned whether he contributed much to mathematics and natural philosophy.^ There is little else about his life of which we can be confident.
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^ The magical powers ascribed to Orpheus, Pythagoras, and other pre-Sokratic sages (even Sokrates) were recognisably shamanic and this included the art of healing through music.
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^ Josh pose la question : What are some ways that we use the pythagorean theorem in jobs, or even in everyday life?

.Many of the accomplishments credited to Pythagoras may actually have been accomplishments of his colleagues and successors.^ Plato credited Pythagoras with teaching a way of life, and many of Plato's ideas can be traced back to Pythagoras.
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.Whether or not his disciples believed that everything was related to mathematics and that numbers were the ultimate reality is unknown.^ "Our experience hitherto justifies us in believing that nature is the realization of the simplest conceivable mathematical ideas," Einstein wrote.
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^ Pythagoreans believed that all relations could be reduced to number relations ("all things are numbers").
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^ Tegmark, Max, "Mathematical Cosmos: Reality by Numbers," New Scientist , 195(2621): 39-41 ( September 17, 2007 ).
  • The Math Book: From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension, 250 Milestones in the History of Mathematics 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC sprott.physics.wisc.edu [Source type: Academic]

.It was said that he was the first man to call himself a philosopher, or lover of wisdom,[2] and Pythagorean ideas exercised a marked influence on Plato, and through him, all of western philosophy.^ Instead of calling himself wise, he pursued wisdom through friendship and therefore called himself a philosopher, possibly the first to do so.
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^ Pythagoras himself was widely presented as having anticipated Plato's later metaphysics, in which the one and the indefinite dyad are first principles.
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^ This does not mean, however, that all Pythagorean philosophy was secret.
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Contents

Biographical sources

.Accurate facts about the life of Pythagoras are so few, and most information concerning him is of so late a date, and so untrustworthy, that it is impossible to provide more than a vague outline of his life.^ There are a variety of stories about his death, but the most reliable evidence (Aristoxenus and Dicaearchus) suggests that violence directed against Pythagoras and his followers in Croton ca.
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^ Unfortunately we can say little more about the details of Pythagoras' conception of the soul or of metempsychosis.
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^ Pyrrhus's talents brought him success neither in Greece nor in Italy, where Roman will and power were more than his match.
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The lack of information by contemporary writers, together with the secrecy which surrounded the Pythagorean brotherhood, meant that invention took the place of facts. .The stories which were created were eagerly sought by the Neoplatonist writers who provide most of the details about Pythagoras, but who were uncritical concerning anything which related to the gods or which was considered divine.^ There are a variety of stories about his death, but the most reliable evidence (Aristoxenus and Dicaearchus) suggests that violence directed against Pythagoras and his followers in Croton ca.
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^ Unfortunately we can say little more about the details of Pythagoras' conception of the soul or of metempsychosis.
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^ The most detailed accounts of Pythagoras’ life date from the third century CE, some 800 years after his death.
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[3] .Thus many myths were created – such as that Apollo was his father; that Pythagoras gleamed with a supernatural brightness; that he had a golden thigh; that Abaris came flying to him on a golden arrow; that he was seen in different places at one and the same time.^ Aristotle emphasized his superhuman nature in the following ways: there was a story that Pythagoras had a golden thigh (a sign of divinity); the people of Croton called him the Hyperborean Apollo (one of the god Apollo's manifestations); the Pythagoreans taught that “of rational beings, one sort is divine, one is human, and another such as Pythagoras” (Iamblichus, VP 31); Pythagoras was seen on the same day at the same time in both Metapontum and Croton; he killed a deadly snake by biting it; as he was crossing a river it spoke to him (all citations are from Aristotle, Fr.
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^ Even so, one would not be remiss in questioning Iamblichus’ intentions, with a programme of his own and so far removed from Pythagoras’ own time.
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^ Pythagoras as a wonder-worker, who had a golden thigh and bit a snake to death (Fr.
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[4] .With the exception of a few remarks by Xenophanes, Heraclitus, Herodotus, Plato, Aristotle, and Isocrates, we are mainly dependent on Diogenes Laërtius, Porphyry, and Iamblichus for the biographical details.^ Diogenes is potentially the more objective, but both Iamblichus and Porphyry had agendas that were not particularly concerned with historical accuracy.
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^ Diogenes may have some claim to objectivity, but both Iamblichus and Porphyry have strong agendas that have little to do with historical accuracy.
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.Aristotle had written a separate work on the Pythagoreans, which unfortunately has not survived.^ The most important of these sources are the fragments of Aristotle's lost treatises on the Pythagoreans and the fragments of works on Pythagoreanism or of works which dealt in passing with Pythagoreanism written by Aristotle's pupils Dicaearchus and Aristoxenus, in the second half of the fourth century BCE. The historian Timaeus of Tauromenium (ca.
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^ The most important of these sources are the fragments of Aristotle's lost treatises on the Pythagoreans and the fragments of works on Pythagoreanism or of works which dealt in passing with Pythagoreanism written by Aristotle's pupils Dicaearchus and Aristoxenus, in the second half of the fourth century BC. The historian Timaeus of Tauromenium (ca.
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[5] His disciples Dicaearchus, Aristoxenus, and Heraclides Ponticus had written on the same subject. These writers, late as they are, are among the best sources from whom Porphyry and Iamblichus drew, besides the legendary accounts and their own inventions. .Hence historians are often reduced to considering the statements based on their inherent probability, but even then, if all the credible stories concerning Pythagoras were supposed true, his range of activity would be impossibly vast.^ One could almost say that God, or the Nature of the Universe, thinks in numbers, which notion probably would not have surprised Pythagoras at all.

^ He struggled for justice as a private citizen because he felt that if he had become a public statesman, he would probably have been put to death even sooner.
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^ Now it would be laborious to have to do this even in a MIDI file without a computer doing all the grunt for you.
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[6]

Life

Bust of Pythagoras, Vatican
.Herodotus, Isocrates, and other early writers all agree that Pythagoras was born on Samos, the Greek island in the eastern Aegean, and we also learn that Pythagoras was the son of Mnesarchus.^ Burkert begins his treatise on this enigmatic philosopher writing that ‘Over the origins of Greek philosophy and science lies the shadow of a great traditional name’, [1] that is: Pythagoras of Samos (c.
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^ Thus, the second standard source for evidence for early Greek philosophy is, in the case of Pythagoras, tainted at the source.
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^ Thus, not only is Pythagoras not commonly known as a geometer in the time of Plato and Aristotle, but also the most authoritative history of early Greek geometry assigns him no role in the history of geometry at all.
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[7] His father was a gem-engraver or a merchant. .His name led him to be associated with Pythian Apollo; Aristippus explained his name by saying, "He spoke (agor-) the truth no less than did the Pythian (Pyth-)," and Iamblichus tells the story that the Pythia prophesied that his pregnant mother would give birth to a man supremely beautiful, wise, and beneficial to humankind.^ (Interestingly, this paper has no figures, which may explain why this did not stimulate further work until the 1970s.
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^ This would continue until you reach the top or bottom floor, where there is at least 4 meters but less than 8 meters to the top or bottom of the sphere.

^ He asked his older brother to advise him and cure him of his faults, and he would also teach his brother, who had led a riotous life.
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[8] A late source gives his mother's name as Pythias.[9] As to the date of his birth, Aristoxenus stated that Pythagoras left Samos in the reign of Polycrates, at the age of 40, which would give a date of birth around 570 BC.[10]
.It was natural for the ancient biographers to inquire as to origins of Pythagoras' remarkable system.^ It is reasonable to consider that these mystical attributes, originally Pherekydes’, became later associated with Pythagoras on account of the inclinations of ancient biographers to embellish their tales of famous individuals with mythical attributes.
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.In the absence of reliable information, however, a huge range of teachers were assigned to Pythagoras.^ In each case, however, Burkert has shown that these reports seem to be false and the result of the glorification of Pythagoras in the later tradition, since the earliest and most reliable evidence assigns these same discoveries to someone else (1972a, 303 ff.
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Some made his training almost entirely Greek, others exclusively Egyptian and Oriental. .We find mentioned as his instructors Creophylus,[11] Hermodamas,[12] Bias,[11] Thales,[11] Anaximander,[13] and Pherecydes of Syros.^ They will each create harmonics of themselves which will be frequencies of: 1 --> 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ...
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^ Now what is immediately obvious here is that some frequencies are produced in many more ways than others; 4, 6, 8, and especially 12 are produced often while 11 and 13 aren't.
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[14] .The Egyptians are said to have taught him geometry, the Phoenicians arithmetic, the Chaldeans astronomy, the Magians the principles of religion and practical maxims for the conduct of life.^ One who reduces the principles of philosophy to practice in the conduct of life; one who lives according to the rules of practical wisdom; one who meets or regards all vicissitudes with calmness.
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[15] .Of the various claims regarding his Greek teachers, Pherecydes is mentioned most often.^ A third source of evidence for early Greek philosophy is regarded with great skepticism by most scholars and, in the case of most early Greek philosophers, used only with great caution.
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.It was the standard belief in antiquity that Pythagoras had undertaken extensive travels, and had visited not only Egypt, but Arabia, Phoenicia, Judaea, Babylon, and even India, for the purpose of collecting all available knowledge, and especially to learn information concerning the secret or mystic cults of the gods.^ Plutarch's home was at Chaeronea, near Delphi, where he became a priest of the Pythian Apollo, but he also traveled throughout Greece, visited Egypt and Rome, and learned Latin as a tool of research.
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^ It is clear, nonetheless, that 150 years after his death conflicting traditions regarding Pythagoras' beliefs had arisen on even the most central issues.
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^ There are a number of reports that he traveled widely in the Near East while living on Samos, e.g., to Babylonia, Phoenicia and Egypt.
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[16] The journey to Babylon is possible, and not very unlikely. .That Pythagoras visited Egypt, may be more probable, and many ancient writers asserted this.^ Now we will show how to mix and compound many simples together, that the mixture may cause them to be more operative.
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[17] .According to Muslim tradition, Pythagoras was said to have been initiated by Hermes (Egyptian Thoth).^ "According to Aristotle he (Pythagoras) said to avoid beans, since they are similar to genitals, and to the gates of Hell...

[18] Enough of Egypt was known to attract the curiosity of an inquiring Greek, and contact between Samos and other parts of Greece with Egypt is mentioned.[19]
.It is not easy to say how much Pythagoras learned from the Egyptian priests, or indeed, whether he learned anything at all from them.^ BC) says of Phercydes of Syros that “although dead he has a pleasant life for his soul, if Pythagoras is truly wise, who knew and learned wisdom beyond all men.” Here Pythagoras is again the expert on the life of the soul after death.
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^ The end of all wisdom is in me; if there is anything more [of wisdom], tell my Pythagoras that he is the first of all throughout the land of Hellas.
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^ BCE) says of Phercydes of Syros that “although dead he has a pleasant life for his soul, if Pythagoras is truly wise, who knew and learned wisdom beyond all men.” Here Pythagoras is again the expert on the life of the soul after death.
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.There was nothing in the symbolism which the Pythagoreans adopted which showed the distinct traces of Egypt.^ Use of salt on the dinner table has nothing to do with either of these processes, but the following remark shows that Pythagoreans were interested in explaining "salt-pickling" and "salt by evaporation of water" as phenomena.

.The secret religious rites of the Pythagoreans exhibited nothing but what might have been adopted in the spirit of Greek religion, by those who knew nothing of Egyptian mysteries.^ The discoveries might be as early as Hippasus in the middle of the fifth century, who is associated with a group of Pythagoreans known as the mathematici , who arose after Pythagoras' death (see below).
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^ A number of these practices can be paralleled in Greek mystery religions of the day (Burkert 1972a, 177).
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.The philosophy and the institutions of Pythagoras might easily have been developed by a Greek mind exposed to the ordinary influences of the age.^ Burkert begins his treatise on this enigmatic philosopher writing that ‘Over the origins of Greek philosophy and science lies the shadow of a great traditional name’, [1] that is: Pythagoras of Samos (c.
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^ Thus, the second standard source for evidence for early Greek philosophy is, in the case of Pythagoras, tainted at the source.
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^ Pythagoras        Pythagoras of Samos , c.560-c.480 BC, was a Greek philosopher and religious leader who was responsible for important developments in the history of mathematics, astronomy, and the theory of music.
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.Even the ancient authorities note the similarities between the religious and ascetic peculiarities of Pythagoras with the Orphic or Cretan mysteries,[20] or the Delphic oracle.^ It is important to note that this is not just a question asked by modern scholars but was already a central question in the fourth century BC. What is the connection between Pythagoras and fifth-century Pythagoreans?
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^ It is important to note that this is not just a question asked by modern scholars but was already a central question in the fourth century BCE. What is the connection between Pythagoras and fifth-century Pythagoreans?
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[21]
.There is little direct evidence as to the kind and amount of knowledge which Pythagoras acquired, or as to his definite philosophical views.^ There are a variety of stories about his death, but the most reliable evidence (Aristoxenus and Dicaearchus) suggests that violence directed against Pythagoras and his followers in Croton ca.
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^ In the end, there is no evidence for Pythagoras' cosmology in the early evidence, beyond what can be reconstructed from acusmata .
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^ There is some evidence that the truth of the relationship was already known to Pythagoras' contemporary, Lasus, who was not a Pythagorean (Burkert 1972a, 377).
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.Everything of the kind mentioned by Plato and Aristotle is attributed not to Pythagoras, but to the Pythagoreans.^ Plato is often thought to be heavily indebted to the Pythagoreans, but he is almost as parsimonious in his references to Pythagoras as Aristotle and mentions him only once in his writings.
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^ He mentions a book by Pythagoras on politics which was supposedly concerned with the inner workings of the Pythagorean society.
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^ By the end of the first century BCE, a large collection of books had been forged in the name of Pythagoras and other early Pythagoreans, which purported to be the original Pythagorean texts from which Plato and Aristotle derived their most important ideas.
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Heraclitus stated that he was a man of extensive learning;[22] and Xenophanes claimed that he believed in the transmigration of souls.[23] Xenophanes mentions the story of his interceding on behalf of a dog that was being beaten, professing to recognise in its cries the voice of a departed friend. .Pythagoras is supposed to have claimed that he had been Euphorbus, the son of Panthus, in the Trojan war, as well as various other characters, a tradesman, a courtesan, etc.^ He is described as being well-travelled, much as with Pythagoras and others.
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[24]
.Many mathematical and scientific discoveries were attributed to Pythagoras, including his famous theorem,[25] as well as discoveries in the field of music,[26] astronomy,[27] and medicine.^ The magical powers ascribed to Orpheus, Pythagoras, and other pre-Sokratic sages (even Sokrates) were recognisably shamanic and this included the art of healing through music.
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^ A significant number of women were purportedly involved in the homakoeion , including Pythagoras’ own wife and daughter who were both famous for their wisdom, according to Porphyry.
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^ All that this tradition ascribes to Pythagoras, then, is discovery of the truth contained in the theorem.
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[28] But it was the religious element which made the profoundest impression upon his contemporaries. .Thus the people of Croton were supposed to have identified him with the Hyperborean Apollo,[29] and he was said to have practised divination and prophecy.^ At a public presentation, the people who had developed the machine said that the head end of the body was more "yang," and the perineum more "yin", and thus the head got the electricity and the perineum the magnetism.
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[30] In the visits to various places in Greece - Delos, Sparta, Phlius, Crete, etc. which are ascribed to him, he usually appears either in his religious or priestly guise, or else as a law­giver.[31]
Croton on the southern coast of Italy
.After his travels, Pythagoras moved (around 530 BC) to Croton, in Italy (Magna Graecia).^ BC), who wrote a history of Sicily, which included material on southern Italy where Pythagoras was active, is also important.
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^ Accounts report that Pythagoras made one or more visits there and to Krete in order to study their laws before journeying to southern Italy, where he settled in Kroton around 530 BCE, and later in the Lakonian colony of Taras.
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^ BC. He then emigrated to the Greek city of Croton in southern Italy ca.
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.Possibly the tyranny of Polycrates in Samos made it difficult for him to achieve his schemes there.^ Aristoxenus says that he left Samos at the age of forty, when the tyranny of Polycrates, who came to power ca.
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.His later admirers claimed that Pythagoras was so overburdened with public duties in Samos, because of the high estimation in which he was held by his fellow-citizens, that he moved to Croton.^ When Pythagoras returned from travels in the Near East, sometime after the middle of the 6th century B.C., he found his home on Samos under the power of a local tyrant, possibly because of this, or for other reasons, he decided to move to the West, which then meant the lower part of Italy later called Magna Graecia.

[32] .On his arrival in Croton, he quickly attained extensive influence, and many people began to follow him.^ He migrated to Croton and founded a philosophical and religious school there that attracted many followers.
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.Later biographers tell fantastical stories of the effects of his eloquent speech in leading the people of Croton to abandon their luxurious and corrupt way of life and devote themselves to the purer system which he came to introduce.^ BC; it is in Croton that he first seems to have attracted a large number of followers to his way of life.
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^ BCE; it is in Croton that he first seems to have attracted a large number of followers to his way of life.
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[33]
His followers established a select brotherhood or club for the purpose of pursuing the religious and ascetic practices developed by their master. The accounts agree that what was done and taught among the members was kept a profound secret. .The esoteric teachings may have concerned the secret religious doctrines and usages, which were undoubtedly prominent in the Pythagorean system, and may have been connected with the worship of Apollo.^ There is one piece of hard evidence that may support some of the literary sources in terms of a real Pythagorean connection with Lakonia, to a point.
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^ Indeed, one would expect that an exclusive society such as that of the Pythagoreans would have secret doctrines and symbols.
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^ Aristotle says that the Pythagoreans “guarded among their very secret doctrines that one type of rational being is divine, one human, and one such as Pythagoras” (Iamblichus, VP 31).
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[34] Temperance of all kinds seems to have been strictly urged. .There is disagreement among the biographers as to whether Pythagoras forbade all animal food,[35] or only certain types.^ The end of all wisdom is in me; if there is anything more [of wisdom], tell my Pythagoras that he is the first of all throughout the land of Hellas.
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^ Over Pherekydes’ life and reported journeys hangs doubt and uncertainty as well as whether he may have been Pythagoras’ teacher and that he may have either had an interest in Sparta and/or went there.
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^ Indeed, the fourth-century mathematician and philosopher Eudoxus says that “he not only abstained from animal food but would also not come near butchers and hunters” (Porphyry, VP 7).
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[36] .The club was in practice at once "a philosophical school, a religious brotherhood, and a political association."^ He migrated to Croton and founded a philosophical and religious school there that attracted many followers.
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[37]
Pythagoras, depicted on a 3rd-century coin
.Such an aristocratic and exclusive club could easily have made many people in Croton jealous and hostile, and this seems to have led to its destruction.^ As mentioned in a previous post in reply to Mary Lynn Richardson, it seems that neolithic people and ancient greeks used a system of measurements which had many ratios of 2 and 3 and also of 12.
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The circumstances, however, are uncertain. Conflict seems to have broken out between the towns of Sybaris and Croton. .The forces of Croton were headed by the Pythagorean Milo, and it is likely that the members of the brotherhood took a prominent part.^ Since our knowledge of the Zen schools is rich and full, we can use it as an intellectual backdrop for the much less well understood school of the Pythagorean brotherhood at Croton.

^ Diet is one of the most basic ways of distinguishing culture, and the Pythagorean preferences may be in part an act of self-identification of the brotherhood as different from ordinary people.

.After the decisive victory by Croton, a proposal for establishing a more democratic constitution, was unsuccessfully resisted by the Pythagoreans.^ AD) wrote On the Pythagorean Life , which includes some biography but focuses more on the way of life established by Pythagoras for his followers.
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^ CE) work is titled On the Pythagorean Life , which includes some limited biography but focuses more on the way of life supposedly established by Pythagoras for his followers.
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^ CE) wrote On the Pythagorean Life , which includes some biography but focuses more on the way of life established by Pythagoras for his followers.
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Their enemies, headed by Cylon and Ninon, the former of whom is said to have been irritated by his exclusion from the brotherhood, roused the populace against them. .An attack was made upon them while assembled either in the house of Milo, or in some other meeting-place.^ The ancients say, that the stones called Prochites and Astroites , laid upon some other plain stone, will move of themselves, if you put Vinegar to them.
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^ Prochites    "...The ancients say, that the stones called Prochites and Astroites , laid upon some other plain stone, will move of themselves, if you put Vinegar to them.
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^ And you shall scarce ever have a good and a sweet Cherry , unless it be by grafting upon some other tree, as Pamphilus reports..."
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.The building was set on fire, and many of the assembled members perished; only the younger and more active escaping.^ Parabolical Section   "...That is called a Parabolical Section , that more forcibly farther off and in shorter time, will set matter on fire..."
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^ The second set of aperiodic tiles, denoted by P2, "was discovered by Penrose in 1974 and is more remarkable than the first in that it contains only two tiles."
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^ Pewter       "... Set it to the fire, and melt in it two pounds of Tartar , and as many of White Arsenic .
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[38] Similar commotions ensued in the other cities of Magna Graecia in which Pythagorean clubs had been formed.
.As an active and organised brotherhood the Pythagorean order was everywhere suppressed, and did not again revive.^ Did he really go to all of these places in person or did the Pythagorean movement make such claims in order to bolster their own credibility?
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^ The Pythagorean question, then, is how to get behind this false glorification of Pythagoras in order to determine what the historical Pythagoras actually thought and did.
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.Still the Pythagoreans continued to exist as a sect, the members of which kept up among themselves their religious observances and scientific pursuits, while individuals, as in the case of Archytas, acquired now and then great political influence.^ A significant part of the Pythagorean way of life thus consisted in the proper observance of religious ritual.
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.Concerning the fate of Pythagoras himself, the accounts varied.^ The discrepancies between the various fourth-century accounts of the Pythagorean way of life suggest that there were disputes among fourth-century Pythagoreans as to the proper way of life and as to the teachings of Pythagoras himself.
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.Some say that he perished in the temple with his disciples,[39] others that he fled first to Tarentum, and that, being driven from there, he escaped to Metapontum, and there starved himself to death.^ The ancients say, that the stones called Prochites and Astroites , laid upon some other plain stone, will move of themselves, if you put Vinegar to them.
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^ First, Pythagoras himself wrote nothing, so our knowledge of Pythagoras' views is entirely derived from the reports of others.
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^ Interestingly, Diogenes Laertius suggests that there is a tradition which claims Pythagoras himself was actively involved in Spartan politics, rather than just studying them, but he does not tell us whom the ominous ‘some’ that say so happen to be.
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[40] His tomb was shown at Metapontum in the time of Cicero.[41]
.According to some accounts Pythagoras married Theano, a lady of Croton.^ The most detailed accounts of Pythagoras’ life date from the third century CE, some 800 years after his death.
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^ The most detailed, extended and hence most influential accounts of Pythagoras' life and thought date to the third century CE, some 800 years after he died.
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^ The most detailed, extended and hence most influential accounts of Pythagoras' life and thought date to the third century AD, some 800 years after he died.
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Their children are variously stated to have included a son, Telauges, and three daughters, Damo, Arignote, and Myia.

Writings

.No texts by Pythagoras are known to have survived, although forgeries under his name — a few of which remain extant — did circulate in antiquity.^ Sparta did enjoy cultural ties with Samos in Classical and pre-Classical antiquity; but, this alone does not prove that Pythagoras actually went there.
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^ The Pythagorean configuration is known under many names, the Bride's Chair being probably the most popular.
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^ Nothing of his original Marvels remains, if it ever existed as a single text, but there are surviving fragments from his voluminous Phillipika (of which book VIII is sometimes referred to as On Marvels ).
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.Critical ancient sources like Aristotle and Aristoxenus cast doubt on these writings.^ The most important of these sources are the fragments of Aristotle's lost treatises on the Pythagoreans and the fragments of works on Pythagoreanism or of works which dealt in passing with Pythagoreanism written by Aristotle's pupils Dicaearchus and Aristoxenus, in the second half of the fourth century BCE. The historian Timaeus of Tauromenium (ca.
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^ There is no direct evidence for these restrictions in the pre-Aristotelian evidence, but both Aristotle and Aristoxenus discuss them extensively.
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.Ancient Pythagoreans usually quoted their master's doctrines with the phrase autos ephe ("he himself said") — emphasizing the essentially oral nature of his teaching.^ That there should be secret teachings about the special nature and authority of the master is not surprising.
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Mathematics

.
The so-called Pythagoreans, who were the first to take up mathematics, not only advanced this subject, but saturated with it, they fancied that the principles of mathematics were the principles of all things.
AristotleMetaphysics 1-5 , cc.^ Aristoxenus, who grew up in the southern Italian town of Tarentum, where the Pythagorean Archytas was the dominant political figure, and who was himself a Pythagorean before joining Aristotle's school, undoubtedly had a rich set of oral traditions upon which to draw.
  • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ For Aristotle Pythagoras did not belong to the succession of thinkers starting with Thales, who were attempting to explain the basic principles of the natural world, and hence he could not see what sense it made to call a fifth-century thinker like Philolaus, who joined that succession by positing limiters and unlimiteds as first principles, a Pythagorean.
  • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Moderatus was an “agressive” Neopythagorean of the first century CE, who reports that Plato, Aristotle, and their pupils Speusippus, Aristoxenus and Xenocrates took for their own everything that was fruitful in Pythagoreanism, leaving only what was superficial and trivial to be ascribed to the school (Dillon 1977, 346).
  • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]

350 BC

Pythagorean theorem

The Pythagorean theorem: The sum of the areas of the two squares on the legs (a and b) equals the area of the square on the hypotenuse (c).
Pythagoras-2a.gif
.Since the fourth century AD, Pythagoras has commonly been given credit for discovering the Pythagorean theorem, a theorem in geometry that states that in a right-angled triangle the square of the hypotenuse (the side opposite the right angle), c, is equal to the sum of the squares of the other two sides, b and a—that is, a2 + b2 = c2.^ Since angle C is right, .
  • Pythagorean Theorem and its many proofs from Interactive Mathematics Miscellany and Puzzles 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.cut-the-knot.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Then the sum of the areas of the squares in two pairs are equal.
  • Pythagorean Theorem and its many proofs from Interactive Mathematics Miscellany and Puzzles 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.cut-the-knot.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The sum of the areas of the two smaller isosceles triangles equals .
  • Pythagorean Theorem and its many proofs from Interactive Mathematics Miscellany and Puzzles 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.cut-the-knot.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.While the theorem that now bears his name was known and previously utilized by the Babylonians and Indians, he, or his students, are often said to have constructed the first proof.^ Modern scholarship has shown, moreover, that the truth of the theorem as an arithmetical technique, once again without proof, was known before Pythagoras among the Babylonians (Burkert 1972a, 429), so it is possible that Pythagoras just passed on to the Greeks a truth that he learned from the East.
  • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]

.It must, however, be stressed that the way in which the Babylonians handled Pythagorean numbers, implies that they knew that the principle was generally applicable, and knew some kind of proof, which has not yet been found in the (still largely unpublished) cuneiform sources.^ Elisha Loomis, myself and no doubt many others believed and still believe that no trigonometric proof of the Pythagorean theorem is possible.
  • Pythagorean Theorem and its many proofs from Interactive Mathematics Miscellany and Puzzles 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.cut-the-knot.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ CE) work is titled On the Pythagorean Life , which includes some limited biography but focuses more on the way of life supposedly established by Pythagoras for his followers.
  • Was Pythagoras Ever Really in Sparta? | Issue #06 | Rosetta 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.rosetta.bham.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ A number of the Pythagorean Symbola are distinguished by their poetic quality, much in the manner of classical Zen koans, while some are at the same time moral and ethical.

[42] .Because of the secretive nature of his school and the custom of its students to attribute everything to their teacher, there is no evidence that Pythagoras himself worked on or proved this theorem.^ There is also no mention of Pythagoras' work in geometry or of the Pythagorean theorem in the early evidence.
  • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ There are a variety of stories about his death, but the most reliable evidence (Aristoxenus and Dicaearchus) suggests that violence directed against Pythagoras and his followers in Croton ca.
  • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Sparta did enjoy cultural ties with Samos in Classical and pre-Classical antiquity; but, this alone does not prove that Pythagoras actually went there.
  • Was Pythagoras Ever Really in Sparta? | Issue #06 | Rosetta 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.rosetta.bham.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.For that matter, there is no evidence that he worked on any mathematical or meta-mathematical problems.^ In the end, there is no evidence for Pythagoras' cosmology in the early evidence, beyond what can be reconstructed from acusmata .
  • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ There is also no mention of Pythagoras' work in geometry or of the Pythagorean theorem in the early evidence.
  • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ There is, moreover, no talk of mathematical proof or a deductive system in the passage from Aristoxenus just quoted.
  • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]

.Some attribute it as a carefully constructed myth by followers of Plato over two centuries after the death of Pythagoras, mainly to bolster the case for Platonic meta-physics, which resonate well with the ideas they attributed to Pythagoras.^ There are a variety of stories about his death, but the most reliable evidence (Aristoxenus and Dicaearchus) suggests that violence directed against Pythagoras and his followers in Croton ca.
  • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Two lines of poetry of indeterminate date are obviously a very slender support upon which to base Pythagoras' reputation as a geometer, but they cannot be simply ignored.
  • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ By the end of the first century BCE, a large collection of books had been forged in the name of Pythagoras and other early Pythagoreans, which purported to be the original Pythagorean texts from which Plato and Aristotle derived their most important ideas.
  • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]

.This attribution has stuck, down the centuries up to modern times.^ A time to build up, a time to break down; A time to dance, a time to mourn; A time to cast away stones, A time to gather stones together.
  • Harmonics, Music, Pythagoras and the Universe 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC ray.tomes.biz [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Experiments have shown that exposing people to slower or faster e/m fields (say 5 or 10 Hz) does either slow down or speed up their reaction times.
  • Harmonics, Music, Pythagoras and the Universe 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC ray.tomes.biz [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[43] .The earliest known mention of Pythagoras's name in connection with the theorem occurred five centuries after his death, in the writings of Cicero and Plutarch.^ Burkert begins his treatise on this enigmatic philosopher writing that ‘Over the origins of Greek philosophy and science lies the shadow of a great traditional name’, [1] that is: Pythagoras of Samos (c.
  • Was Pythagoras Ever Really in Sparta? | Issue #06 | Rosetta 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.rosetta.bham.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The most detailed accounts of Pythagoras’ life date from the third century CE, some 800 years after his death.
  • Was Pythagoras Ever Really in Sparta? | Issue #06 | Rosetta 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.rosetta.bham.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Musical theories and investigations

Medieval woodcut showing Pythagoras with bells in Pythagorean tuning
.According to legend, the way Pythagoras discovered that musical notes could be translated into mathematical equations was when one day he passed blacksmiths at work, and thought that the sounds emanating from their anvils being hit were beautiful and harmonious and decided that whatever scientific law caused this to happen must be mathematical and could be applied to music.^ Vincenzo Galilei noted that "modern" (to him) music just didn't work.
  • Harmonics, Music, Pythagoras and the Universe 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC ray.tomes.biz [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ One possible channel of interaction between music and human emotion and > health could be the "pacing" effect well-known to hypnotists.
  • Harmonics, Music, Pythagoras and the Universe 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC ray.tomes.biz [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ From this basis, one can either compose music that belongs to a particular mode and stays in that mode, or one can compose music that moves through several modes but all keeping the identical tuning for each note.
  • Harmonics, Music, Pythagoras and the Universe 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC ray.tomes.biz [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

He went to the blacksmiths to learn how this had happened by looking at their tools, he discovered that it was because the anvils were "simple ratios of each other, one was half the size of the first, another was 2/3 the size, and so on."
The Pythagoreans elaborated on a theory of numbers, the exact meaning of which is still debated among scholars. Another belief attributed to Pythagoras was that of the "harmony of the spheres." Thus the planets and stars moved according to mathematical equations, which corresponded to musical notes and thus produced a symphony.[44]

Tetractys

.Pythagoras was also credited with devising the tetractys, the triangular figure of four rows, which add up to the perfect number, ten.^ For a perfect magic cube, the numbers are arranged so that each row, each column, each main diagonal of the square cross sections, and each of the four great (space) diagonals (sometimes called "triagonals") containing N integers will add to the same sum.
  • The Math Book: From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension, 250 Milestones in the History of Mathematics 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC sprott.physics.wisc.edu [Source type: Academic]

As a mystical symbol, it was very important to the worship of the Pythagoreans, who would swear oaths by it:
.
And the inventions were so admirable, and so divinised by those who understood them, that the members used them as forms of oath: "By him who handed to our generation the tetractys, source of the roots of ever-flowing nature."
Iamblichus, Vit.^ One must procreate children, [since one should leave behind him persons who will serve God].Iamblichus, D. 464-22 .

^ Since our knowledge of the Zen schools is rich and full, we can use it as an intellectual backdrop for the much less well understood school of the Pythagorean brotherhood at Croton.

Pyth.
, 29

Religion and science

Pythagoras’ religious and scientific views were, in his opinion, inseparably interconnected. Religiously, Pythagoras was a believer of metempsychosis. .He believed in transmigration, or the reincarnation of the soul again and again into the bodies of humans, animals, or vegetables until it became moral.^ If one believes in human/animal re-incarnations, which the ancient tradition attributed to the Pythagoreans, this might suggest affinity with mammal flesh, and ultimately humans.

His ideas of reincarnation were influenced by ancient Greek religion. .He himself claimed to have lived four lives that he could remember in detail, and heard the cry of his dead friend in the bark of a dog.^ The teacher was talking on the phone with a friend who lives four miles north of her.

Lore

Pythagoras became the subject of elaborate legends surrounding his historic persona. Aristotle described Pythagoras as a wonder-worker and somewhat of a supernatural figure, attributing to him such aspects as a golden thigh, which was a sign of divinity. .According to Aristotle and others' accounts, some ancients believed that he had the ability to travel through space and time, and to communicate with animals and plants.^ Gardner, Martin, Time Travel and other Mathematical Bewilderments (New York: Freeman: 1987).
  • The Math Book: From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension, 250 Milestones in the History of Mathematics 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC sprott.physics.wisc.edu [Source type: Academic]

^ The ancients say, that the stones called Prochites and Astroites , laid upon some other plain stone, will move of themselves, if you put Vinegar to them.
  • "Natural Magick" - "Glossary/Index - P" 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC homepages.tscnet.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Moreover, they believe they commune with this realm of timeless entities through a sort of extrasensory perception.
  • The Math Book: From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension, 250 Milestones in the History of Mathematics 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC sprott.physics.wisc.edu [Source type: Academic]

[45] An extract from Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable's entry entitled "Golden Thigh":
Pythagoras is said to have had a golden thigh, which he showed to Abaris, the Hyperborean priest, and exhibited in the Olympic games.[46]
Another legend describes his writing on the moon:
Pythagoras asserted he could write on the moon. His plan of operation was to write on a looking-glass in blood, and place it opposite the moon, when the inscription would appear photographed or reflected on the moon's disc.[47]

Pythagoreans

Pythagoras, the man in the center with the book, teaching music, in The School of Athens by Raphael
.Both Plato and Isocrates affirm that, above all else, Pythagoras was famous for leaving behind him a way of life.^ One must procreate children, [since one should leave behind him persons who will serve God].Iamblichus, D. 464-22 .

^ We know that this breaks down if we try to go all the way round the 12 keys and return as Pythagoras showed.
  • Harmonics, Music, Pythagoras and the Universe 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC ray.tomes.biz [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[48] .Both Iamblichus and Porphyry give detailed accounts of the organisation of the school, although the primary interest of both writers is not historical accuracy, but rather to present Pythagoras as a divine figure, sent by the gods to benefit humankind.^ First, the primary aim of both Greek and Japanese Zen schools was enlightenment.

^ My first step is to give a clear account of the fragments, with only as much scholarly detail as is necessary, and then consider the text for its wide variety of interpretative meanings.

[49]
.Pythagoras set up an organization which was in some ways a school, in some ways a brotherhood, and in some ways a monastery.^ I will scan it and OCR it and set up some extra WWW pages.
  • Harmonics, Music, Pythagoras and the Universe 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC ray.tomes.biz [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

It was based upon the religious teachings of Pythagoras and was very secretive. .The adherents were bound by a vow to Pythagoras and each other, for the purpose of pursuing the religious and ascetic observances, and of studying his religious and philosophical theories.^ Pythagoras        Pythagoras of Samos , c.560-c.480 BC, was a Greek philosopher and religious leader who was responsible for important developments in the history of mathematics, astronomy, and the theory of music.
  • "Natural Magick" - "Glossary/Index - P" 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC homepages.tscnet.com [Source type: Original source]

.The claim that they put all their property into a common stock is perhaps only a later inference from certain Pythagorean maxims and practices.^ If some of my points seem forced, put them on the shelf for future consideration, thinking of the slow pace of the classic Zen Ko'ans of the early period and the way they could later explode into understanding.

^ I hope to put all the details together on my WWW pages so maybe some clever person will come along and put it in to practice.
  • Harmonics, Music, Pythagoras and the Universe 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC ray.tomes.biz [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ At a certain time, neighboring people became alarmed by what was going on at the monastery, they arranged to have it raided and destroyed, therefore only a thin trickle of information about Pythagorean doctrine filtered through to later Greek times.

[50] .On the other hand, it seems certain that there were many women among the adherents of Pythagoras.^ For in many trees, near to the bark, there is a certain Phlegmatic or moist Humor , that is found to Putrify ..."
  • "Natural Magick" - "Glossary/Index - P" 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC homepages.tscnet.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In fact there are many other moderately strong waves predicted but the above ones are the super strong ones.
  • Harmonics, Music, Pythagoras and the Universe 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC ray.tomes.biz [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Many of the students, men and women, are recorded by place of origin, and there is a preponderance of Doric speakers by place of origin.

[51]
As to the internal arrangements of the sect, we are informed that what was done and taught among the members was kept a profound secret towards all. Porphyry stated that this silence was "of no ordinary kind." Candidates had to pass through a period of probation, in which their powers of maintaining silence (echemythia) were especially tested, as well as their general temper, disposition, and mental capacity.[52] There were also gradations among the members themselves. It was an old Pythagorean maxim, that every thing was not to be told to every body.[53] .Thus the Pythagoreans were divided into an inner circle called the mathematikoi ("learners") and an outer circle called the akousmatikoi ("listeners").^ The chord is the tangent of the inner circle and is 14 cm.The outer circle is shaded and the inner circle is not.

^ These Pythagorean sayings are usually called Akousmata, from the verb akouo "hear; listen", or Symbola.

[54] .Iamblichus describes them in terms of esoterikoi and exoterikoi (or alternatively Pythagoreioi and Pythagoristai),[55] according to the degree of intimacy which they enjoyed with Pythagoras.^ "According to Aristotle he (Pythagoras) said to avoid beans, since they are similar to genitals, and to the gates of Hell...

Porphyry wrote "the mathematikoi learned the more detailed and exactly elaborated version of this knowledge, the akousmatikoi (were) those who had heard only the summary headings of his (Pythagoras's) writings, without the more exact exposition."
There were ascetic practices (many of which had, perhaps, a symbolic meaning) in the way of life of the sect.[56] Some represent Pythagoras as forbidding all animal food. This may have been due to the doctrine of metempsychosis.[57] Other authorities contradict the statement. According to Aristoxenus,[58] he allowed the use of all kinds of animal food except the flesh of oxen used for ploughing, and rams.[59] There is a similar discrepancy as to the prohibition of fish and beans.[60] But temperance of all kinds seems to have been urged. It is also stated that they had common meals, resembling the Spartan system, at which they met in companies of ten.[61]
Considerable importance seems to have been attached to music and gymnastics in the daily exercises of the disciples. Their whole discipline is represented as encouraging a lofty serenity and self-possession, of which, there were various anecdotes in antiquity.[62] Iamblichus (apparently on the authority of Aristoxenus)[63] gives a long description of the daily routine of the members, which suggests many similarities with Sparta. The members of the sect showed a devoted attachment to each other, to the exclusion of those who did not belong to their ranks.[64] .There were even stories of secret symbols, by which members of the sect could recognise each other, even if they had never met before.^ But with a somewhat clever program it could recognise that 40/27 and convert to 3/2 by retuning one of the two notes just before playing it.
  • Harmonics, Music, Pythagoras and the Universe 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC ray.tomes.biz [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ To link this to what I said above, it is necessary to recognise that for any given key, especially when chords are played, there is a fundamental frequency which all others are a multiple of.
  • Harmonics, Music, Pythagoras and the Universe 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC ray.tomes.biz [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[65]

Influence

Influence on Plato

Pythagoras, depicted as a medieval scholar in the Nuremberg Chronicle
.Pythagoras or in a broader sense, the Pythagoreans, allegedly exercised an important influence on the work of Plato.^ His work set forth most of the important problems and concepts of Western philosophy, psychology, logic, and politics, and his influence has remained profound from ancient to modern times.
  • "Natural Magick" - "Glossary/Index - P" 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC homepages.tscnet.com [Source type: Original source]

.According to R. M. Hare, his influence consists of three points: a) the platonic Republic might be related to the idea of "a tightly organized community of like-minded thinkers", like the one established by Pythagoras in Croton.^ WIRED "A perpetual idea machine, Clifford Pickover is one of the most creative, original thinkers in the world today."
  • The Math Book: From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension, 250 Milestones in the History of Mathematics 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC sprott.physics.wisc.edu [Source type: Academic]

^ One might almost way that an undue "looking back" constitutes the core of neurosis, and causes the kind of calcification of the mind which Lot's wife physically symbolizes.

b) there is evidence that .Plato possibly took from Pythagoras the idea that mathematics and, generally speaking, abstract thinking is a secure basis for philosophical thinking as well as "for substantial theses in science and morals". c) Plato and Pythagoras shared a "mystical approach to the soul and its place in the material world". It is probable that both have been influenced by Orphism.^ But Pythagorean thought did not die out in the ancient world, if later became fused with the popular cult of Orphism, and retained a place in the Hellenistic academic world Plato was deeply influenced by Pythagorean thinking although he hardly mentions it, while Aristotle gave a reasoned critique of what he understood the Pythagoreans to have added to Greek philosophy.

^ Just visit my web site pickover.com, and send me an e-mail explaining the idea and how you feel it influenced the mathematical world.
  • The Math Book: From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension, 250 Milestones in the History of Mathematics 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC sprott.physics.wisc.edu [Source type: Academic]

^ Howard Eves writes of Charles Hermite, "Pythagoras entertained this idea of mathematical existence, as have many mathematicians after him.
  • The Math Book: From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension, 250 Milestones in the History of Mathematics 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC sprott.physics.wisc.edu [Source type: Academic]

[66]
.Bertrand Russell, in his History of Western Philosophy, contended that the influence of Pythagoras on Plato and others was so great that he should be considered the most influential of all western philosophers.^ Pythagoras was the most puzzling mathematician of history because he founded a numerical religion whose main tenants were transmigration of souls and the sinfulness of eating beans, along with a host of other odd rules and regulations.
  • The Math Book: From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension, 250 Milestones in the History of Mathematics 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC sprott.physics.wisc.edu [Source type: Academic]

^ The older philosopher was a close friend of Plato's family, and Plato's writings attest to Socrates ' great influence on him.
  • "Natural Magick" - "Glossary/Index - P" 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC homepages.tscnet.com [Source type: Original source]

^ His work set forth most of the important problems and concepts of Western philosophy, psychology, logic, and politics, and his influence has remained profound from ancient to modern times.
  • "Natural Magick" - "Glossary/Index - P" 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC homepages.tscnet.com [Source type: Original source]

But Pythagoras also had his critics, such as Heraclitus who said that "much learning does not teach wisdom; otherwise it would have taught Hesiod and Pythagoras, and again Xenophanes and Hecataeus".[67]

Influence on esoteric groups

Pythagoras started a secret society called the Pythagorean brotherhood devoted to the study of mathematics. .This had a great effect on future esoteric traditions, such as Rosicrucianism and Freemasonry, both of which were occult groups dedicated to the study of mathematics and both of which claimed to have evolved out of the Pythagorean brotherhood.^ In the Pythagorean tradition the *tetraktys* of the dekad was demonstrated with such pebbles as unit markers.
  • Harmonics, Music, Pythagoras and the Universe 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC ray.tomes.biz [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

The mystical and occult qualities of Pythagorean mathematics are discussed in a chapter of Manly P. Hall's The Secret Teachings of All Ages entitled "Pythagorean Mathematics".
.Pythagorean theory was tremendously influential on later numerology, which was extremely popular throughout the Middle East in the ancient world.^ But Pythagorean thought did not die out in the ancient world, if later became fused with the popular cult of Orphism, and retained a place in the Hellenistic academic world Plato was deeply influenced by Pythagorean thinking although he hardly mentions it, while Aristotle gave a reasoned critique of what he understood the Pythagoreans to have added to Greek philosophy.

The 8th-century Muslim alchemist Jabir ibn Hayyan grounded his work in an elaborate numerology greatly influenced by Pythagorean theory.[citation needed] Today, Pythagoras is revered as a prophet by the Ahl al-Tawhid or Druze faith along with his fellow Greek, Plato.

See also

References

  1. ^ "The dates of his life cannot be fixed exactly, but assuming the approximate correctness of the statement of Aristoxenus (ap. Porph. V.P. 9) that he left Samos to escape the tyranny of Polycrates at the age of forty, we may put his birth round about 570 BC, or a few years earlier. The length of his life was variously estimated in antiquity, but it is agreed that he lived to a fairly ripe old age, and most probably he died at about seventy-five or eighty." William Keith Chambers Guthrie, (1978), A history of Greek philosophy, Volume 1: The earlier Presocratics and the Pythagoreans, page 173. Cambridge University Press
  2. ^ Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 5.3.8-9 = Heraclides Ponticus fr. 88 Wehrli, Diogenes Laërtius 1.12, 8.8, Iamblichus VP 58. Burkert attempted to discredit this ancient tradition, but it has been defended by C.J. De Vogel, Pythagoras and Early Pythagoreanism (1966), pp. 97-102, and C. Riedweg, Pythagoras: His Life, Teaching, And Influence (2005), p. 92.
  3. ^ Iamblichus, Adhort. ad Philos. p. 324, ed. Kiessling.
  4. ^ Comp. Herodian, iv. 94, etc.
  5. ^ He alludes to it himself, Met. i. 5. p. 986. 12, ed. Bekker.
  6. ^ This article incorporates text from the public domain Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology by William Smith (1870).
  7. ^ Herodotus, iv. 95, Isocrates, Busiris, 28-9; Later writers called him a Tyrrhenian or Phliasian, and gave Marmacus, or Demaratus, as the name of his father, Diogenes Laërtius, viii. 1; Porphyry, Vit. Pyth. 1, 2; Justin, xx. 4; Pausanias, ii. 13.
  8. ^ Riedweg, Christoph (2005). Pythagoras: His Life, Teaching and Influence. Cornell University. pp. 5–6, 59, 73. 
  9. ^ Apollonius of Tyana ap. Porphyry, Vit. Pyth. 2
  10. ^ Porphyry, Vit. Pyth. 9
  11. ^ a b c Iamblichus, Vit. Pyth. 9
  12. ^ Porphyry, Vit. Pyth. 2, Diogenes Laërtius, viii. 2
  13. ^ Iamblichus, Vit. Pyth. 9; Porphyry, Vit. Pyth. 2
  14. ^ Aristoxenus and others in Diogenes Laërtius, i. 118, 119; Cicero, de Div. i. 49
  15. ^ Porphyry, Vit. Pyth. 6
  16. ^ Diogenes Laërtius, viii. 2; Porphyry, Vit. Pyth. 11, 12; Iamblichus, Vit. Pyth. 14, etc.
  17. ^ Antiphon. ap. Porphyry, Vit. Pyth. 7; Isocrates, Busiris, 28-9; Cicero, de Finibus, v. 27; Strabo, xiv.
  18. ^ See Antoine Faivre, in The Eternal Hermes (1995)
  19. ^ Herodotus, ii. 134, 135, iii. 39.
  20. ^ Iamblichus, Vit. Pyth. 25; Porphyry, Vit. Pyth. 17; Diogenes Laërtius, viii. 3
  21. ^ Ariston. ap. Diogenes Laërtius, viii. 8, 21; Porphyry, Vit. Pyth. 41
  22. ^ Diogenes Laërtius, viii. 6, ix. 1, comp. Herodotus, i. 29, ii. 49, iv. 95
  23. ^ Diogenes Laërtius, viii. 36, comp. Aristotle, de Anima, i. 3; Herodotus, ii. 123.
  24. ^ Porphyry, Vit. Pyth. 26; Pausanias, ii. 17; Diogenes Laërtius, viii. 5; Horace, Od. i. 28,1. 10
  25. ^ Diogenes Laërtius, viii. 12 ; Plutarch, Non posse suav. vivi sec. Ep. p. 1094
  26. ^ Porphyry, in Ptol. Harm. p. 213; Diogenes Laërtius, viii. 12
  27. ^ Diogenes Laërtius, viii. 14 ; Pliny, Hist. Nat. ii. 8
  28. ^ Diogenes Laërtius, viii. 12, 14, 32
  29. ^ Porphyry, Vit. Pyth. 20; Iamblichus, Vit. Pyth. 31, 140; Aelian, Varia Historia, ii. 26; Diogenes Laërtius, viii. 36.
  30. ^ Cicero, de Divin. i. 3, 46; Porphyry, Vit. Pyth. 29.
  31. ^ Iamblichus, Vit. Pyth. 25; Porphyry, Vit. Pyth. 17; Diogenes Laërtius, viii. 3, 13; Cicero, Tusc. Qu. v. 3
  32. ^ Iamblichus, Vit. Pyth. 28; Porphyry, Vit. Pyth. 9
  33. ^ Porphyry, Vit. Pyth. 18; Iamblichus, Vit. Pyth. 37, etc.
  34. ^ Aelian, Varia Historia, ii. 26; Diogenes Laërtius, viii. 13; Iamblichus, Vit. Pyth. 8, 91, 141
  35. ^ as Empedocles did afterwards, Aristotle, Rhet. i. 14. § 2; Sextus Empiricus, ix. 127. This was also one of the Orphic precepts, Aristoph. Ran. 1032
  36. ^ Aristo ap. Diogenes Laërtius, viii. 20; comp. Porphyry, Vit. Pyth. 7; Iamblichus, Vit. Pyth. 85, 108
  37. ^ Thirlwall, Hist. of Greece, vol. ii. p. 148
  38. ^ Iamblichus, Vit. Pyth. 255-259; Porphyry, Vit. Pyth. 54-57; Diogenes Laërtius, viii. 39; comp. Plutarch, de Gen. Socr. p. 583
  39. ^ Arnob. adv. Gentes, i. p. 23
  40. ^ Diogenes Laërtius, viii. 39, 40; Porphyry, Vit. Pyth. 56; Iamblichus, Vit. Pyth. 249; Plutarch, de Stoic. Rep. 37
  41. ^ Cicero, de Fin. v. 2
  42. ^ There are about 100,000 unpublished cuneiform sources in the British Museum alone. Babylonian knowledge of proof of the Pythagorean Theorem is discussed by J. Høyrup, 'The Pythagorean "Rule" and "Theorem" - Mirror of the Relation between Babylonian and Greek Mathematics,' in: J. Renger (red.): Babylon. Focus mesopotamischer Geschichte, Wiege früher Gelehrsamkeit, Mythos in der Moderne (1999).
  43. ^ From Christoph Riedweg , Pythagoras, His Life, Teaching and Influence, Cornell: Cornell University Press, 2005: "Had Pythagoras and his teachings not been since the early Academy overwritten with Plato’s philosophy, and had this ‘palimpsest’ not in the course of the Roman Empire achieved unchallenged authority among Platonists, it would be scarcely conceivable that scholars from the Middle Ages and modernity down to the present would have found the Presocratic charismatic from Samos so fascinating. In fact, as a rule it was the image of Pythagoras elaborated by Neopythagoreans and Neoplatonists that determined the idea of what was Pythagorean over the centuries."
  44. ^ Christoph Riedweg, Pythagoras: His Life, Teaching and Influence, Cornell: Cornell University Press, 2005 .
  45. ^ Huffman, Carl. Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)
  46. ^ Brewer, E. Cobham, Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable
  47. ^ Brewer, E. Cobham, Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable
  48. ^ Plato, Republic, 600a, Isocrates, Busiris, 28
  49. ^ John Dillon and Jackson Hershbell, (1991), Iamblichus, On the Pythagorean Way of Life, page 14. Scholars Press.; D. J. O'Meara, (1989), Pythagoras Revived. Mathematics and Philosophy in Late Antiquity, pages 35-40. Clarendon Press.
  50. ^ comp. Cicero, de Leg. i. 12, de Off. i. 7; Diogenes Laërtius, viii. 10
  51. ^ Porphyry, Vit. Pyth. 19
  52. ^ Aristonexus ap. Iamblichus, Vit. Pyth. 94
  53. ^ Diogenes Laërtius, viii. 15; Aristonexus ap. Iamblichus, Vit. Pyth. 31
  54. ^ Iamblichus, Vit. Pyth. 80, cf. Aulus Gellius, i. 9
  55. ^ Iamblichus, Vit. Pyth. 80
  56. ^ comp. Porphyry, Vit. Pyth. 32; Iamblichus, Vit. Pyth. 96, etc.
  57. ^ Plutarch, de Esu Carn. pp. 993, 996, 997
  58. ^ Aristoxenus ap. Diogenes Laërtius, viii. 20
  59. ^ comp. Porphyry, Vit. Pyth. 7; Iamblichus, Vit. Pyth. 85, 108
  60. ^ Diogenes Laërtius, viii. 19, 34; Aulus Gellius, iv. 11; Porphyry, Vit. Pyth. 34, de Abst. i. 26; Iamblichus, Vit. Pyth. 98
  61. ^ Iamblichus, Vit. Pyth. 98; Strabo, vi.
  62. ^ Athenaeus, xiv. 623; Aelian, Varia Historia, xiv. 18; Iamblichus, Vit. Pyth. 197
  63. ^ Iamblichus, Vit. Pyth. 96-101
  64. ^ Aristonexus ap. Iamblichus, Vit. Pyth. 94, 101, etc., 229, etc.; comp. the story of Damon and Phintias; Porphyry, Vit. Pyth. 60; Iamblichus, Vit. Pyth. 233, etc.
  65. ^ Scholion ad Aristophanes, Nub. 611; Iamblichus, Vit. Pyth. 237, 238
  66. ^ R.M. Hare, Plato in C.C.W. Taylor, R.M. Hare and Jonathan Barnes, Greek Philosophers, Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999 (1982), 103-189, here 117-9.
  67. ^ Diog. L. ix. 1 (Fr. 40 in Vorsokratiker, i3, p. 86. 1-3)

Sources

Classical secondary sources

.Only a few relevant source texts deal with Pythagoras and the Pythagoreans, most are available in different translations.^ Diet is one of the most basic ways of distinguishing culture, and the Pythagorean preferences may be in part an act of self-identification of the brotherhood as different from ordinary people.

Other texts usually build solely on information in these works.
  • Diogenes Laërtius, Vitae philosophorum VIII (Lives of Eminent Philosophers), c. 200 AD, which in turn reference the lost work Successions of Philosophers by Alexander Polyhistor) — Pythagoras, Translation by C.D. Yonge
  • Porphyry, Vita Pythagorae (Life of Pythagoras), c. 270 AD
  • Iamblichus, De Vita Pythagorica (On the Pythagorean Life), c. .300 AD
  • Apuleius also writes about Pythagoras in Apologia, including a story of him being taught by Babylonian disciples of Zoroaster, c.^ Howard Eves writes of Charles Hermite, "Pythagoras entertained this idea of mathematical existence, as have many mathematicians after him.
    • The Math Book: From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension, 250 Milestones in the History of Mathematics 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC sprott.physics.wisc.edu [Source type: Academic]

    ^ Ptolomaus    "...For being smeared about with G arlic , it will not draw Iron to it, as Plutark has noted, and after him Ptolomaus ; The L oadstone has in it a poisonous   Virtue , and G arlic is good against Poison ..."
    • "Natural Magick" - "Glossary/Index - P" 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC homepages.tscnet.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ See:   Life of Numa "...For being smeared about with garlic (loadstone), it will not draw iron to it, as Plutark has noted, and after him Ptolomaus ;..."
    • "Natural Magick" - "Glossary/Index - P" 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC homepages.tscnet.com [Source type: Original source]

    150 AD
  • Hierocles of Alexandria, Golden Verses of Pythagoras, Concord Grove Pr., 1983 c.430 AD

Modern secondary sources

  • Burkert, Walter. Lore and Science in Ancient Pythagoreanism. .Harvard University Press, June 1, 1972. ISBN 0-674-53918-4
  • Burnyeat, M. F. "The Truth about Pythagoras".^ I have included details about these and other dissections proofs (including proofs of the Law of Cosines) in my recent book "Dissections: Plane & Fancy", Cambridge University Press, 1997.
    • Pythagorean Theorem and its many proofs from Interactive Mathematics Miscellany and Puzzles 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.cut-the-knot.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Dauben, Joseph Warren, Georg Cantor: His Mathematics and Philosophy of the Infinite (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1979).
    • The Math Book: From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension, 250 Milestones in the History of Mathematics 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC sprott.physics.wisc.edu [Source type: Academic]

    ^ Von Baeyer, Hans Christian, Information ( Cambridge , Massachusetts : Harvard University Press, 2004).
    • The Math Book: From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension, 250 Milestones in the History of Mathematics 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC sprott.physics.wisc.edu [Source type: Academic]

    .London Review of Books, 22 February 2007.
  • Guthrie, W. K. A History of Greek Philosophy: Earlier Presocratics and the Pythagoreans, Cambridge University Press, 1979. ISBN 0-521-29420-7
  • Kingsley, Peter.^ Reprinted in The Collected Mathematical Papers of James Joseph Sylvester , Volume 1, (18371853) (Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, 1904).
    • The Math Book: From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension, 250 Milestones in the History of Mathematics 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC sprott.physics.wisc.edu [Source type: Academic]

    ^ Sabbagh, Karl, "The Strange Case of Louis de Branges," London Review of Books , 26(14), July 22, 2004 ; see http://www.lrb.co.uk/v26/n14/sabb01_.html .
    • The Math Book: From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension, 250 Milestones in the History of Mathematics 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC sprott.physics.wisc.edu [Source type: Academic]

    ^ Press: Cambridge , 2007).
    • The Math Book: From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension, 250 Milestones in the History of Mathematics 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC sprott.physics.wisc.edu [Source type: Academic]

    .Ancient Philosophy, Mystery, and Magic: Empedocles and the Pythagorean Tradition.^ If one believes in human/animal re-incarnations, which the ancient tradition attributed to the Pythagoreans, this might suggest affinity with mammal flesh, and ultimately humans.

    .Oxford University Press, 1995.
  • Hermann, Arnold.^ (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1867), published as a second edition by Cambridge University Press in 1878.
    • The Math Book: From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension, 250 Milestones in the History of Mathematics 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC sprott.physics.wisc.edu [Source type: Academic]

    ^ Stewart, Ian, Math Hysteria ( New York : Oxford University Press, 2004) (Contains several references on "squaring the square."
    • The Math Book: From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension, 250 Milestones in the History of Mathematics 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC sprott.physics.wisc.edu [Source type: Academic]

    ^ Pickover, Clifford, Surfing through Hyperspace (New York: Oxford University, Press, 1999).
    • The Math Book: From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension, 250 Milestones in the History of Mathematics 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC sprott.physics.wisc.edu [Source type: Academic]

    .To Think Like God: Pythagoras and Parmenides—the Origins of Philosophy.^ Parmenides turns philosophy away from questions of cosmos formation to what he sees as a prior question: What must the world be like if it is to be intelligible?
    • "Natural Magick" - "Glossary/Index - P" 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC homepages.tscnet.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Perhaps God thinks more like a computer than we like to imagine, somewhat in the mathematical mode which Pythagoras foresaw.

    ^ One could almost say that God, or the Nature of the Universe, thinks in numbers, which notion probably would not have surprised Pythagoras at all.

    Parmenides Publishing, 2005. ISBN 978-1-930972-00-1
  • O'Meara, Dominic J. Pythagoras Revived. Oxford University Press, 1989. ISBN 0-19-823913-0 (paperback), ISBN 0-19-824485-1 (hardcover)

External links


Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

Rest satisfied with doing well, and leave others to talk of you as they please.
.Pythagoras (Πυθαγόρας) of Samos (c.^ Pythagoras (Πυθαγόρας) of Samos ( c .
  • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Pythagoras of Samos (Greek: Πυθαγόρας ; between 580 and 572 BC–between 500 and 490 BC) was an Ionian (Greek) philosopher [1] and founder of the religious movement called Pythagoreanism.
  • WikiSlice 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC dev.laptop.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

582 BCc. .496 BC) was an Ionian Greek philosopher and founder of the religious movement called Pythagoreanism, often revered as a great mathematician, mystic and scientist.^ BC ) was an Ionian Greek philosopher and founder of the religious movement called Pythagoreanism , often revered as a great mathematician, mystic and scientist.
  • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Socratic Greek philosopher, founder of the Pythagorean school.
  • Pythagoras: Free Encyclopedia Articles at Questia.com Online Library 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.questia.com [Source type: Academic]

^ Pythagoras of Samos (Greek: Πυθαγόρας ; between 580 and 572 BC–between 500 and 490 BC) was an Ionian (Greek) philosopher [1] and founder of the religious movement called Pythagoreanism.
  • WikiSlice 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC dev.laptop.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Contents

Sourced

Let no one persuade you by word or deed to do or say whatever is not best for you.
Number is the ruler of forms and ideas, and the cause of gods and daemons.
Reason is immortal, all else mortal.
Truth is so great a perfection, that if God would render himself visible to men, he would choose light for his body and truth for his soul.
Sooner throw a pearl at hazard than an idle or useless word; and do not say a little in many words, but a great deal in a few.
There is no word or action but has its echo in Eternity.
Thought is an Idea in transit, which when once released, never can be lured back, nor the spoken word recalled.
.
The oldest, shortest words— "yes" and "no"— are those which require the most thought.
  • I was Euphorbus at the siege of Troy.
    • As reported by Heraclides Ponticus (c.^ The two geometric proofs require no words, but do require a little thought.
      • Pythagorean Theorem and its many proofs from Interactive Mathematics Miscellany and Puzzles 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.cut-the-knot.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ The meaning is that we should devote our thoughts and words to higher matters of the spirit, not waste them on trivial, everyday affairs of no importance.
      • The Precepts of Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.donaldtyson.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ When he observed philosophers and physicians, he called humans the most intelligent animal; but seeing diviners puffed up by wealth, he thought no animal more silly.
      • Greek Philosophers and Aristophanes by Sanderson Beck 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

      360 B.C), and Diogenes Laërtius, and quoted in Cosmic Optimism : A Study of the Interpretation of Evolution (1949) by Frederick William Conner
    • Misquoted as "I was at Euphorbus at the siege of Troy." in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia of Practical Quotations (1922)
  • Dear youths, I warn you cherish peace divine,
    And in your hearts lay deep these words of mine.^ Diogenes Laertius, Lives of eminent philosophers (New York, 1925).
    • Pythagoras, Phoenician/Greek Mathematician 20 September 2009 19:18 UTC www.phoenicia.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
    • Pythagoras, Phoenician/Greek Mathematician 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC phoenicia.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Dear youths, I warn you cherish peace divine, And in your hearts lay deep these words of mine.
    • Diogenes Laertius, Life of Pythagoras, from Lives of the Philosophers, translated by C.D. Yonge 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.classicpersuasion.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ B.C), and Diogenes Laërtius , in Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers , "Pythagoras", Sect.5, in the translation of C. D. Yonge (1853) Dear youths, I warn you cherish peace divine, And in your hearts lay deep these words of mine.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • As reported by Heraclides, son of Sarapion, and Diogenes Laërtius, in Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers, "Pythagoras", Sect.^ Lives of eminent philosophers ..

      ^ This is the biographical tradition represented by the Lives of the Philosophers written by Diogenes Laertius.
      • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 20 September 2009 19:18 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy/Winter 2006) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ Pythagoras , the Greek philosopher and mathematician who lived in southern Italy 2,500 years ago.
      • Pythagoras: Free Encyclopedia Articles at Questia.com Online Library 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.questia.com [Source type: Academic]

      .6, in the translation of C. D. Yonge (1853)
  • The soul of man is divided into three parts, intelligence, reason, and passion.^ C. D. Yonge (1853) The soul of man is divided into three parts, intelligence, reason, and passion.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Intelligence and passion are possessed by other animals, but reason by man alone.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Also, a circle cannot be divided into seven parts by any known construction).
    • Geometry in Art & Architecture Unit 3 20 September 2009 19:18 UTC www.dartmouth.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .Intelligence and passion are possessed by other animals, but reason by man alone.^ Intelligence and passion are possessed by other animals, but reason by man alone.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is highly probable that Pythagoras possessed hypnotic power, not only over man but also over animals.
    • Secret Teachings of All Ages: The Life and Philosophy of Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.sacred-texts.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He also says that the soul of man is divided into three parts; into intuition ( nous ), and reason ( phren ) and mind ( thymos ), and that the first and last divisions are found also in other animals, but that the middle one, reason, is only found in man.
    • Diogenes Laertius, Life of Pythagoras, from Lives of the Philosophers, translated by C.D. Yonge 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.classicpersuasion.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • As reported by Alexander Polyhistor, and Diogenes Laërtius in Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers, "Pythagoras", Sect.^ This is the biographical tradition represented by the Lives of the Philosophers written by Diogenes Laertius.
      • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy/Winter 2006) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ Pythagoras was one of the earliest Greek philosopher...who lived a few hundred years after Pythagoras time.
      • Pythagoras: Free Encyclopedia Articles at Questia.com Online Library 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.questia.com [Source type: Academic]

      ^ As quoted in Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers by Diogenes Laërtius , as translated by Robert Drew Hicks (1925); also in The Demon and the Quantum : From the Pythagorean Mystics to Maxwell's Demon (2007) by Robert J. Scully, Marlan O. Scully, p.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .8, in the translation of C. D. Yonge (1853)
  • We ought so to behave to one another as to avoid making enemies of our friends, and at the same time to make friends of our enemies.
    • As quoted in Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers, by Diogenes Laërtius, "Pythagoras", Sect.^ C. D. Yonge (1853) We ought so to behave to one another as to avoid making enemies of our friends, and at the same time to make friends of our enemies.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Diogenes Laertius, Lives of eminent philosophers (New York, 1925).
      • Pythagoras, Phoenician/Greek Mathematician 20 September 2009 19:18 UTC www.phoenicia.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
      • Pythagoras, Phoenician/Greek Mathematician 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC phoenicia.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ Diogenes Laertius, Lives of the Eminent Philosophers , tr.
      • Greek Philosophers and Aristophanes by Sanderson Beck 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

      .8, as translated in Dictionary of Quotations (1906) by Thomas Benfield Harbottle, p.^ Dictionary of Quotations (1906) by Thomas Benfield Harbottle, p.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ As quoted in Aurea Carmina by Hierocles of Alexandria , as translated in Dictionary of Quotations (1906) by Thomas Benfield Harbottle, p.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ As quoted in Florilegium , XVIII, 23, as translated in Dictionary of Quotations (1906) by Thomas Benfield Harbottle, p.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .320
  • In anger we should refrain both from speech and action.
    • As quoted in Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers, by Diogenes Laërtius, "Pythagoras", Sect.^ Diogenes Laertius, Lives of eminent philosophers (New York, 1925).
      • Pythagoras, Phoenician/Greek Mathematician 20 September 2009 19:18 UTC www.phoenicia.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
      • Pythagoras, Phoenician/Greek Mathematician 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC phoenicia.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ In anger we should refrain both from speech and action.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Diogenes Laertius, Lives of the Eminent Philosophers , tr.
      • Greek Philosophers and Aristophanes by Sanderson Beck 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

      .8, as translated in Dictionary of Quotations (1906) by Thomas Benfield Harbottle, p.^ Dictionary of Quotations (1906) by Thomas Benfield Harbottle, p.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ As quoted in Aurea Carmina by Hierocles of Alexandria , as translated in Dictionary of Quotations (1906) by Thomas Benfield Harbottle, p.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ As quoted in Florilegium , XVIII, 23, as translated in Dictionary of Quotations (1906) by Thomas Benfield Harbottle, p.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .370
  • Reason is immortal, all else mortal.
    • As quoted in Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers by Diogenes Laërtius, as translated by Robert Drew Hicks (1925); also in The Demon and the Quantum : From the Pythagorean Mystics to Maxwell's Demon (2007) by Robert J. Scully, Marlan O. Scully, p.^ This is the biographical tradition represented by the Lives of the Philosophers written by Diogenes Laertius.
      • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 20 September 2009 19:18 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy/Winter 2006) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ As quoted in Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers by Diogenes Laërtius , as translated by Robert Drew Hicks (1925); also in The Demon and the Quantum : From the Pythagorean Mystics to Maxwell's Demon (2007) by Robert J. Scully, Marlan O. Scully, p.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ THE LIVES AND OPINIONS OF EMINENT PHILOSOPHERS .
      • Diogenes Laertius, Life of Pythagoras, from Lives of the Philosophers, translated by C.D. Yonge 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.classicpersuasion.org [Source type: Original source]

      .11
  • The most momentous thing in human life is the art of winning the soul to good or to evil.
    • As quoted in Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers by Diogenes Laërtius, as translated by Robert Drew Hicks (1925)
    • Variant translation: The most momentous thing in human life is the art of winning the soul to good or evil.^ The most momentous thing in human life is the art of winning the soul to good or to evil.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Diogenes Laertius, Lives of eminent philosophers (New York, 1925).
      • Pythagoras, Phoenician/Greek Mathematician 20 September 2009 19:18 UTC www.phoenicia.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
      • Pythagoras, Phoenician/Greek Mathematician 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC phoenicia.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ As quoted in Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers by Diogenes Laërtius , as translated by Robert Drew Hicks (1925) Variant translation: The most momentous thing in human life is the art of winning the soul to good or evil.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .
      • As quoted in Ionia, a Quest (1954) by Freya Stark, p.^ As quoted in Ionia, a Quest (1954) by Freya Stark , p.
        • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
        • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

        .94
  • Friends share all things.
    • As quoted in Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers, by Diogenes Laërtius, "Pythagoras", Sect.^ Friends share all things.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Diogenes Laertius, Lives of the Eminent Philosophers , tr.
      • Greek Philosophers and Aristophanes by Sanderson Beck 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ This is often published as a direct quote of Pythagoras, but seems to be derived from the account of Diogenes Laertius of Pythagorean doctrines, where he simply describes the statement as a precept of his followers.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .10
  • Power is the near neighbour of necessity.
    • As quoted in Aurea Carmina by Hierocles of Alexandria, as translated in Dictionary of Quotations (1906) by Thomas Benfield Harbottle, p.^ As quoted in Aurea Carmina by Hierocles of Alexandria , as translated in Dictionary of Quotations (1906) by Thomas Benfield Harbottle, p.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ As quoted in Florilegium , XVIII, 23, as translated in Dictionary of Quotations (1906) by Thomas Benfield Harbottle, p.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ As quoted in Florilegium , I.22, as translated in Dictionary of Quotations (1906) by Thomas Benfield Harbottle, p.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .356
  • Number is the ruler of forms and ideas, and the cause of gods and daemons.
    • As quoted in Life of Pythagoras (c.^ Number is the ruler of forms and ideas, and the cause of gods and daemons .
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ More importantly, for Pythagoras and his followers philosophy was not merely an intellectual pursuit, but a way of life , the aim of which was the assimilation to God.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Joseph Dame Weeks in History of the Knights of Pythias, with an Account of the Life and Times of Damon and Pythias (1874) The bolded portion of this has sometimes been presented as a quote of Pythagoras, but has not been found in this form in any existing translations of his statements.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .300) by Iamblichus of Chalcis, as translated by Thomas Taylor (1818)
  • Sobriety is the strength of the soul, for it preserves its reason unclouded by passion.
    • As quoted in The History of Philosophy: From the Earliest Times to the Beginning of the Present Century (1819) by William Enfield
    • Sobriety is the strength of the mind; for it preserves reason unclouded by passion.^ Strength of mind rests in sobriety; for this keeps your reason unclouded by passion.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ As quoted in the translation of Thomas Taylor (1818) Not frequently man from man.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Iamblichus of Chalcis , as translated by Thomas Taylor (1818) Sobriety is the strength of the soul, for it preserves its reason unclouded by passion.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .
      • As quoted in Bible of Reason (1831) by Benjamin F. Powell, p.^ As quoted in Bible of Reason (1831) by Benjamin F. Powell, p.
        • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
        • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

        .157
    • Strength of mind rests in sobriety; for this keeps your reason unclouded by passion.
      • As quoted in Dictionary of Quotations from Ancient and Modern English and Foreign Sources (1899) by James Wood
  • None but God is wise.
    • As quoted in The Diegesis (1829) by Robert Taylor, p.^ Strength of mind rests in sobriety; for this keeps your reason unclouded by passion.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Iamblichus of Chalcis , as translated by Thomas Taylor (1818) Sobriety is the strength of the soul, for it preserves its reason unclouded by passion.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ As quoted in The History of Philosophy: From the Earliest Times to the Beginning of the Present Century (1819) by William Enfield Sobriety is the strength of the mind; for it preserves reason unclouded by passion.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .219
  • Silence is better than unmeaning words.
    • As quoted in Encyclopaedia Americana (1832) Vol.^ Silence is better than unmeaning words.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ As quoted in Encyclopaedia Americana (1832) Vol.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ It is better wither to be silent, or to say things of more value than silence.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      X, p. .445 edited by Francis Lieber, E. Wigglesworth, and Thomas Gamaliel Bradford
  • If there be light, then there is darkness; if cold, heat; if height, depth; if solid, fluid; if hard, soft; if rough, smooth; if calm, tempest; if prosperity, adversity; if life, death.^ Francis Lieber, E. Wigglesworth, and Thomas Gamaliel Bradford If there be light, then there is darkness; if cold, heat; if height, depth; if solid, fluid; if hard, soft; if rough, smooth; if calm, tempest; if prosperity, adversity; if life, death.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He also taught that light and darkness, and cold and heat, and dryness and moisture, were equally divided in the world; and that, while heat was predominant it was summer; while cold had the mastery it was winter; when dryness prevailed it was spring; and when moisture preponderated, winter.
    • Diogenes Laertius, Life of Pythagoras, from Lives of the Philosophers, translated by C.D. Yonge 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.classicpersuasion.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ More simply, the proportion "soft: heat: hard" identifies fire as a quasi-catalytic process, which changes the nature of Ferrum, Fe.

    • As quoted in Bibliotheca Sacra and Theological Review by Vol. IV, No. .8 (1847) by Dallas Theological Seminary, p.^ Dallas Theological Seminary, p.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .107
  • Rest satisfied with doing well, and leave others to talk of you as they please.
    • As quoted in The World's Laconics : Or, The Best Thoughts of the Best Authors (1853) by Everard Berkeley
    • Variant: Rest satisfied with doing well, and leave others to talk of you as they will.
  • It is only necessary to make war with five things; with the maladies of the body, the ignorances of the mind, with the passions of the body, with the seditions of the city and the discords of families.^ Rest satisfied with doing well, and leave others to talk of you as they please.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ As quoted in The World's Laconics : Or, The Best Thoughts of the Best Authors (1853) by Everard Berkeley Variant: Rest satisfied with doing well, and leave others to talk of you as they will.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Jump to: navigation , search Rest satisfied with doing well, and leave others to talk of you as they please.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
  • As soon as laws are necessary for men, they are no longer fit for freedom.
    • As quoted in Short Sayings of Great Men : With Historical and Explanatory Notes‎ (1882) by Samuel Arthur Bent, p.^ V As soon as laws are necessary for men, they are no longer fit for freedom.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ All great religions have these periods of sanity, otherwise they would have no followers at all.
      • Little Journeys Vol. 10: Great Teachers by Elbert Hubbard: Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.online-literature.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ As quoted in Geary's Guide to the World's Great Aphorists‎ (2007) by James Geary Educate the children and it won't be necessary to punish the men.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .454
  • Friends are as companions on a journey, who ought to aid each other to persevere in the road to a happier life.^ Friends are as companions on a journey, who ought to aid each other to persevere in the road to a happier life.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Of his friends, forty who were gathered together in a house were attacked and slain; while others were gradually slain as they came to the city.
    • Porphyry, Life of Pythagoras (1920).  English translation 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.tertullian.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I explained the above by email to a friend who is into drumming with others and was investigating putting different ratio rhythms together.
    • Harmonics, Music, Pythagoras and the Universe 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC ray.tomes.biz [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .
    • As quoted in Gems of Thought: Being a Collection of More Than a Thousand Choice Selections, Or Aphorisms, from Nearly Four Hundred and Fifty Different Authors, and on One Hundred and Forty Different Subjects (1888).^ This most famous philosopher was born sometime between 600 and 590 B.C., and the length of his life has been estimated at nearly one hundred years.
      • Secret Teachings of All Ages: The Life and Philosophy of Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.sacred-texts.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ As quoted in Gems of Thought: Being a Collection of More Than a Thousand Choice Selections, Or Aphorisms, from Nearly Four Hundred and Fifty Different Authors, and on One Hundred and Forty Different Subjects (1888).
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ The Masnavi of Jalaluddin Rumi is an overtly religious work formed within an Islamic context more than seven hundred years ago.

      p. .97 by Charles Northend
  • Anger begins in folly, and ends in repentance.^ Charles Northend Anger begins in folly, and ends in repentance.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    • As quoted in Best Thoughts of Best Thinkers : Amplified, Classified, Exemplified and Arranged as a Key to Unlock the Literature of All Ages (1904) by Hialmer Day Gould, Edward Louis Hessenmueller.
  • Number rules the universe.
    • As quoted in The Story Of A Number‎ (1905) by E. Maor; also in Comic Sections (1993) by Desmond MacHale
  • Choose always the way that seems the best, however rough it may be; custom will soon render it easy and agreeable. .
    • As quoted in A Dictionary of Thoughts : Being a Cyclopedia of Laconic Quotations from the Best Authors of the World, both Ancient and Modern (1908) by Tyron Edwards, p.^ As quoted in Aurea Carmina by Hierocles of Alexandria , as translated in Dictionary of Quotations (1906) by Thomas Benfield Harbottle, p.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ As quoted in Gems of Thought: Being a Collection of More Than a Thousand Choice Selections, Or Aphorisms, from Nearly Four Hundred and Fifty Different Authors, and on One Hundred and Forty Different Subjects (1888).
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ As quoted in Best Thoughts of Best Thinkers : Amplified, Classified, Exemplified and Arranged as a Key to Unlock the Literature of All Ages (1904) by Hialmer Day Gould, Edward Louis Hessenmueller.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .101
  • It is better wither to be silent, or to say things of more value than silence. Sooner throw a pearl at hazard than an idle or useless word; and do not say a little in many words, but a great deal in a few.^ It is better wither to be silent, or to say things of more value than silence.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Silence is better than unmeaning words.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Sooner throw a pearl at hazard than an idle or useless word; and do not say a little in many words, but a great deal in a few.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • As quoted in A Dictionary of Thoughts : Being a Cyclopedia of Laconic Quotations from the Best Authors of the World, both Ancient and Modern (1908) by Tyron Edwards, p.^ As quoted in Aurea Carmina by Hierocles of Alexandria , as translated in Dictionary of Quotations (1906) by Thomas Benfield Harbottle, p.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ As quoted in Gems of Thought: Being a Collection of More Than a Thousand Choice Selections, Or Aphorisms, from Nearly Four Hundred and Fifty Different Authors, and on One Hundred and Forty Different Subjects (1888).
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ As quoted in Best Thoughts of Best Thinkers : Amplified, Classified, Exemplified and Arranged as a Key to Unlock the Literature of All Ages (1904) by Hialmer Day Gould, Edward Louis Hessenmueller.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      525
  • Truth is so great a perfection, that if God would render himself visible to men, he would choose light for his body and truth for his soul. .
    • As quoted in A Dictionary of Thoughts : Being a Cyclopedia of Laconic Quotations from the Best Authors of the World, both Ancient and Modern (1908) by Tyron Edwards, p.^ As quoted in Aurea Carmina by Hierocles of Alexandria , as translated in Dictionary of Quotations (1906) by Thomas Benfield Harbottle, p.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ As quoted in Gems of Thought: Being a Collection of More Than a Thousand Choice Selections, Or Aphorisms, from Nearly Four Hundred and Fifty Different Authors, and on One Hundred and Forty Different Subjects (1888).
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ As quoted in Best Thoughts of Best Thinkers : Amplified, Classified, Exemplified and Arranged as a Key to Unlock the Literature of All Ages (1904) by Hialmer Day Gould, Edward Louis Hessenmueller.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .592
  • There are men and gods, and beings like Pythagoras.
    • Of himself, as quoted in History of Western Philosophy (1945) by Bertrand Russell
  • There is no word or action but has its echo in Eternity.
    Thought is an Idea in transit, which when once released, never can be lured back, nor the spoken word recalled.^ Of himself, as quoted in History of Western Philosophy (1945) by Bertrand Russell There is no word or action but has its echo in Eternity.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ There are men and gods, and beings like Pythagoras.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Thought is an Idea in transit, which when once released, never can be lured back, nor the spoken word recalled.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Nor ever can the overt act be erased All that thou thinkest, sayest, or doest bears perpetual record of itself, enduring for Eternity.^ Nor ever can the overt act be erased All that thou thinkest, sayest, or doest bears perpetual record of itself, enduring for Eternity.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • As quoted in Pythagoron : The Religious, Moral, and Ethical Teachings of Pythagoras (1947) by Hobart Huson, p.^ As quoted in Pythagoron : The Religious, Moral, and Ethical Teachings of Pythagoras (1947) by Hobart Huson, p.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ In addition to silence as a moral discipline, there is early evidence that secrecy was kept about certain of the teachings of Pythagoras.
      • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ The Cabbala, as any other religious and philosophical system, is an echo of the Sacred Teachings of the East - through the Vedas, Upanishads; the Teachings of Egypt, Chaldea, Assyria; of Orpheus, Pythagoras , etc.
      • The Esoteric Pythagoras 20 September 2009 19:18 UTC www.reversespins.com [Source type: Original source]

      .99
  • There is geometry in the humming of the strings, there is music in the spacing of the spheres.
    • As quoted in The Mystery of Matter‎ (1965) edited by Louise B. Young
  • As long as Man continues to be the ruthless destroyer of lower living beings, he will never know health or peace.^ There is music in the spacings of the spheres .
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ As quoted in The Mystery of Matter‎ (1965) edited by Louise B. Young As long as Man continues to be the ruthless destroyer of lower living beings, he will never know health or peace.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ There is geometry in the humming of the strings, there is music in the spacing of the spheres.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .For as long as men massacre animals, they will kill each other.^ For as long as men massacre animals, they will kill each other.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ For example, he may have argued that it was legitimate to kill and eat sacrificial animals, on the grounds that the souls of men do not enter into these animals (Iamblichus, VP 85).
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy/Winter 2006) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ When asked what he prayed for, Apollonius replied that he prayed that the laws not be broken, that the wise may continue to be poor, but that others may be rich so long as they are so without fraud.
    • Greek Philosophers and Aristophanes by Sanderson Beck 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Indeed, he who sows the seed of murder and pain cannot reap joy and love.^ Indeed, he who sows the seed of murder and pain cannot reap joy and love.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Children well loved and kept close to their parents grow up into men and women who are an ornament to the State and a joy to the gods.
    • Little Journeys Vol. 10: Great Teachers by Elbert Hubbard: Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.online-literature.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • As quoted in Vegetarian Times, No.^ As quoted in Vegetarian Times , No.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      168 (August 1991),p. .4
  • Time is the soul of this world.
  • Most men and women, by birth or nature, lack the means to advance in wealth and power, but all have the ability to advance in knowledge.^ Time is the soul of this world.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ As quoted in Wisdom (2002) by Desmond MacHale Most men and women, by birth or nature, lack the means to advance in wealth and power, but all have the ability to advance in knowledge.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Then at times he gave lectures to women only, and then to men only, and also to children, thus showing that modern revival methods are not wholly modern.
    • Little Journeys Vol. 10: Great Teachers by Elbert Hubbard: Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.online-literature.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • As quoted in The Golden Ratio (2002) by Mario Livio
  • Man know thyself; then thou shalt know the Universe and God.^ Man know thyself; then thou shalt know the Universe and God.
    • Numerology - Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.timstouse.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ As quoted in The Golden Ratio (2002) by Mario Livio Man know thyself; then thou shalt know the Universe and God.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Pythagoras taught that both man and the universe were made in the image of God; that both being made in the same image, the understanding of one predicated the knowledge of the other.
    • Secret Teachings of All Ages: The Life and Philosophy of Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.sacred-texts.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • As quoted in Fragments of Reality : Daily Entries of Lived Life (2006) by Peter Cajander , p.^ As quoted in 25 Days to Better Thinking & Better Living : A Guide for Improving Every Aspect of Your Life (2006) by Linda Elder and Richard Paul It is not proper either to have a blunt sword or to use freedom of speech ineffectually.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Introduction to Arithmetic (extant), Life of Pythagoras (fragments quoted in Iamblichus etc.
      • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 20 September 2009 19:18 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy/Winter 2006) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ Art of Worldly Wisdom Daily In the 1600s, Balthasar Gracian , a jesuit priest wrote 300 aphorisms on living life called "The Art of Worldly Wisdom."
      • Little Journeys Vol. 10: Great Teachers by Elbert Hubbard: Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.online-literature.com [Source type: Original source]

      .109
  • The oldest, shortest words— "yes" and "no"— are those which require the most thought.
    • As quoted in Numerology for Relationships : A Guide to Birth Numbers (2006) by Vera Kaikobad, p.^ The two geometric proofs require no words, but do require a little thought.
      • Pythagorean Theorem and its many proofs from Interactive Mathematics Miscellany and Puzzles 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.cut-the-knot.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ But there is evidence that he valued relationships between numbers such as those embodied in the so-called Pythagorean theorem, though it is not likely that he proved the theorem.
      • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 20 September 2009 19:18 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy/Winter 2006) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ There is evidence that he valued relationships between numbers such as those embodied in the so-called Pythagorean theorem, though it is not likely that he proved the theorem.
      • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]

      .78
  • A blow from your friend is better than a kiss from your enemy.
    • As quoted in Geary's Guide to the World's Great Aphorists‎ (2007) by James Geary, p.^ A blow from your friend is better than a kiss from your enemy.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ As quoted in Geary's Guide to the World's Great Aphorists‎ (2007) by James Geary Educate the children and it won't be necessary to punish the men.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ As quoted in 25 Days to Better Thinking & Better Living : A Guide for Improving Every Aspect of Your Life (2006) by Linda Elder and Richard Paul It is not proper either to have a blunt sword or to use freedom of speech ineffectually.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .118
  • Write in the sand the flaws of your friend.^ Write in the sand the flaws of your friend.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    • As quoted in Geary's Guide to the World's Great Aphorists‎ (2007) by James Geary
  • Educate the children and it won't be necessary to punish the men.
    • As quoted in Geary's Guide to the World's Great Aphorists‎ (2007) by James Geary

The Symbols

English translations of the "Symbols" of Pythagoras recorded by Iamblichus of Chalcis from those in The Golden Verses of Pythagoras and other Pythagorean Fragments (1904) Selected and arranged by Florence M. Firth
Disbelieve nothing wonderful concerning the gods, nor concerning divine dogmas.
Assist a man in raising a burden; but do not assist him in laying it down.
.
Abstain from beans.
  • When going to the temple to adore Divinity neither say nor do any thing in the interim pertaining to the common affairs of life.^ When going to the temple to adore Divinity neither say nor do any thing in the interim pertaining to the common affairs of life.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Going away to a holy temple, kneel down, and the meanwhile neither think nor do anything pertaining to one's regular life.

    ^ Going away to a holy temple, kneel down, and meanwhile neither think nor do anything pertaining to one's regular life.

    .
    • Symbol 1
  • Sacrifice and adore unshod.
    • Symbol 3
  • Disbelieve nothing wonderful concerning the gods, nor concerning divine dogmas.^ Symbol 3 Disbelieve nothing wonderful concerning the gods, nor concerning divine dogmas.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Symbol 1 Sacrifice and adore unshod.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ XLVI. Adore the gods and sacrifice barefoot.
    • The Precepts of Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.donaldtyson.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Symbol 4
  • Declining from the public ways, walk in unfrequented paths.^ I. Declining from the public ways, walk in unfrequented paths .
    • Secret Teachings of All Ages: The Life and Philosophy of Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.sacred-texts.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Symbol 4 Declining from the public ways, walk in unfrequented paths.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Youth, personified by the candidate, walking the Path of Life, symbolized by the central stem of the Υ, reaches the point where the Path divides.
    • Secret Teachings of All Ages: The Life and Philosophy of Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.sacred-texts.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Symbol 5
  • Govern your tongue before all other things, following the gods.^ II. Govern your tongue before all other things, following the gods .
    • Secret Teachings of All Ages: The Life and Philosophy of Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.sacred-texts.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Symbol 5 Govern your tongue before all other things, following the gods.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Control your tongue above all else when following the Gods.

    .
    • Symbol 7
  • The wind is blowing, adore the wind.
    • Symbol 8
  • Cut not fire with a sword.^ Symbol 8 Cut not fire with a sword.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Symbol 7 The wind is blowing, adore the wind.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ III. The wind blowing, adore the sound .
    • Secret Teachings of All Ages: The Life and Philosophy of Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.sacred-texts.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Symbol 9
    • Variant translation: Poke not the fire with a sword.^ Symbol 8 Cut not fire with a sword.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Symbol 9 Variant translation: Poke not the fire with a sword.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Fire symbolizes anger, the sword symbolizes strife or conflict.
      • The Precepts of Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.donaldtyson.com [Source type: Original source]

      .
      • As quoted in Short Sayings of Great Men : With Historical and Explanatory Notes‎ (1882) by Samuel Arthur Bent, p.^ As quoted in Geary's Guide to the World's Great Aphorists‎ (2007) by James Geary Educate the children and it won't be necessary to punish the men.
        • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
        • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

        ^ More than a hundred years ago The American Mathematical Monthly published a series of short notes listing great many proofs of the Pythagorean theorem.
        • Pythagorean Theorem and its many proofs from Interactive Mathematics Miscellany and Puzzles 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.cut-the-knot.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

        ^ As quoted in Short Sayings of Great Men : With Historical and Explanatory Notes‎ (1882) by Samuel Arthur Bent, p.
        • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
        • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

        .455
  • Assist a man in raising a burden; but do not assist him in laying it down.^ Assist a man in raising a burden; but do not assist him in laying it down.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ IV. Assist a man in raising a burden; but do not assist him in laying it down .
    • Secret Teachings of All Ages: The Life and Philosophy of Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.sacred-texts.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Help a man to take up a burden, but not to lay it down, meant, to encourage no one to be indolent, but to apply oneself to labor and virtue.
    • Porphyry, Life of Pythagoras (1920).  English translation 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.tertullian.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Symbol 11
  • Step not beyond the beam of the balance.
    • Symbol 14
  • Having departed from your house, turn not back; for the furies will be your attendants.^ Symbol 11 Step not beyond the beam of the balance.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Do not step over the beam of a balance.
    • LRB · M.F. Burnyeat · Other Lives 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.lrb.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Symbol 14 Having departed from your house, turn not back; for the furies will be your attendants.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Symbol 15
  • Eat not the heart. .
    • Symbol 30; explained in the edition used here: "This Symbol signifies that it is not proper to divulse the union and consent of the universe.^ Symbol 30; explained in the edition used here: "This Symbol signifies that it is not proper to divulse the union and consent of the universe.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ The explanation provided in the translation used here states: " This Symbol admonishes us to beware of everything which is corruptive of our converse with the gods and divine prophecy.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ And the other symbols may be explained in a similar manner, that we may not be too prolix here.
      • Diogenes Laertius, Life of Pythagoras, from Lives of the Philosophers, translated by C.D. Yonge 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.classicpersuasion.org [Source type: Original source]

      .And still further it signifies this, Be not envious, but philanthropic and communicative; and from this it exhorts us to philosophize.^ And still further it signifies this, Be not envious, but philanthropic and communicative; and from this it exhorts us to philosophize.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Hence it exhorts us to sympathy and mutual love, and to be truly communicative, as it becomes rational animals.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .For philosophy alone among the sciences and arts is neither pained with the goods of others, nor rejoices in evils of neighbours, these being allied and familiar by nature, subject to the like passions, and exposed to one common fortune; and evinces that all men are equally incapable of foreseeing future events.^ For philosophy alone among the sciences and arts is neither pained with the goods of others, nor rejoices in evils of neighbours, these being allied and familiar by nature, subject to the like passions, and exposed to one common fortune; and evinces that all men are equally incapable of foreseeing future events.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ One should observe these lines of good and evil.
      • The Esoteric Pythagoras 20 September 2009 19:18 UTC www.reversespins.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ A couple of bits, in translation, follow: Music was numbered by the ancients among the arts that are called liberal, that is, worthy of a free man, and among the Greeks its masters and discoverers, like those of almost all the other sciences, were always in great esteem.
      • Harmonics, Music, Pythagoras and the Universe 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC ray.tomes.biz [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      .Hence it exhorts us to sympathy and mutual love, and to be truly communicative, as it becomes rational animals.
    • Variant translation: Do not eat your heart.
  • Eat not the brain.^ Variant translation: Do not eat your heart.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Hence it exhorts us to sympathy and mutual love, and to be truly communicative, as it becomes rational animals.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Eat not the heart"--do not act so as to harrow the feelings of your friends, and do not be morbid.
    • Little Journeys Vol. 10: Great Teachers by Elbert Hubbard: Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.online-literature.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Symbol 31
  • Κυάμων ἀπέχεσθαι
    • Abstain from beans.
    • Symbol 37; This was long thought by many to be simply a dietary proscription, and often ridiculed, but many consider it to have originally been intended as advice against getting involved in politics, for voting on issues in his time was often done by using differently colored beans.^ Symbol 37; This was long thought by many to be simply a dietary proscription, and often ridiculed, but many consider it to have originally been intended as advice against getting involved in politics, for voting on issues in his time was often done by using differently colored beans.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Symbol 31 Κυάμων ἀπέχεσθαι Abstain from beans.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ One popular ancient interpretation was that it means to abstain from politics, because it was the custom in the days of Pythagoras to choose officials by casting white and black beans in a vote.
      • The Precepts of Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.donaldtyson.com [Source type: Original source]

      .Others have stated that it might signify a more general admonition against relying on the votes of people to determine truths of reality.^ Others have stated that it might signify a more general admonition against relying on the votes of people to determine truths of reality.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Socrates discussed justice in situations where others, such as Crito, might have thought other considerations were more important, because for Socrates justice was apparently most important.
      • Greek Philosophers and Aristophanes by Sanderson Beck 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

      .The explanation provided in the translation used here states: "This Symbol admonishes us to beware of everything which is corruptive of our converse with the gods and divine prophecy."
  • Abstain from animals.^ The explanation provided in the translation used here states: " This Symbol admonishes us to beware of everything which is corruptive of our converse with the gods and divine prophecy.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I swear it by the One who in our hearts engraved The sacred Tetrad , symbol immense and pure, Source of Nature and model of the Gods.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Symbol 3 Disbelieve nothing wonderful concerning the gods, nor concerning divine dogmas.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Symbol 39; explained in the edition used here: "This Symbol exhorts to justice, to all the honour of kindred, to the reception of similar life, and to many other things of a like kind."

The Golden Verses

Quotes cited as from the "Golden Verses", but drawn from various translations.
Above all things reverence thy Self.
.
Work at these things, practice them...
^ Work at these things, practice them, these are the things you ought to desire; they are what will put you on the path of divine virtue — yes, by the one who entrusted our soul with the tetraktys , source of ever-flowing nature.
  • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Work at these things, practice them...
  • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

they are what will put you on the path of divine virtue — yes, by the one who entrusted our soul with the tetraktys, source of ever-flowing nature.
Meditate upon my counsels; love them; follow them; To the divine virtues will they know how to lead thee...
Holding fast to these things, you will know the worlds of gods and mortals which permeates and governs everything.
.
You will know, as is right, nature similar in all respects, so that you will neither entertain unreasonable hopes nor be neglectful of anything.
  • Above and before all things, worship GOD!
    • As quoted in The Sayings of the Wise : Or, Food for Thought : A Book of Moral Wisdom, Gathered from the Ancient Philosophers (1555) by William Baldwin [1908 edition]
    • Variant translation: Honor first the immortal gods, in the manner prescribed, and respect the oath.
      Next, honor the reverent heroes and the spirits of the dead by making the traditional sacrifices.^ Quotes of Pythagoras as translated in The Sayings of the Wise : Or, Food for Thought : A Book of Moral Wisdom, Gathered from the Ancient Philosophers (1555) by William Baldwin [1908 edition] When a reasonable Soul forsaketh his divine nature, and becometh beast-like, it dieth.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Above all things reverence thyself.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ His interpretation was that we should know God first, and nature second.
      • The Precepts of Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.donaldtyson.com [Source type: Original source]


      .Honor your parents and your relatives.^ Honor your parents and your relatives.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .As for others, befriend whoever excels in virtue.^ As for others, befriend whoever excels in virtue.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]


      .Yield to kind words and helpful deeds, and do not hate your friend for a trifling fault as you are able.^ Yield to kind words and helpful deeds, and do not hate your friend for a trifling fault as you are able.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Thank you for your help!

      ^ Pythagoras Let no man by word or deed persuade you To do or to say that which is not best for you.
      • Greek Philosophers and Aristophanes by Sanderson Beck 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

      .For ability is near to necessity.^ For ability is near to necessity.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .
      • As quoted in Divine Harmony : The Life and Teachings of Pythagoras by John Strohmeier and Peter Westbrook.^ By directing that his disciples eat what the gods eat, Pythagoras implied that in order to awaken their divine nature, his followers should nourish themselves on life rather than on death.
        • The Precepts of Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.donaldtyson.com [Source type: Original source]

        ^ Secret Teachings of All Ages: The Life and Philosophy of Pythagoras Sacred Texts Esoteric Index Previous Next .
        • Secret Teachings of All Ages: The Life and Philosophy of Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.sacred-texts.com [Source type: Original source]

        ^ Plato credited Pythagoras with teaching a way of life, and many of Plato's ideas can be traced back to Pythagoras.
        • Greek Philosophers and Aristophanes by Sanderson Beck 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

        .(1999) ISBN 0-9653774-5-8
  • Above all things reverence thy Self.
    • Variant translations:
    • Respect yourself above all.
      • As quoted in Divine Harmony : The Life and Teachings of Pythagoras by John Strohmeier and Peter Westbrook.^ Thus adorned with courageous pride and reverence, he has a pleasant life for his soul though he be dead, if indeed Pythagoras was truly wise, who beyond all knew and searched out the thoughts of men.
        • Was Pythagoras Ever Really in Sparta? | Issue #06 | Rosetta 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.rosetta.bham.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

        ^ The discrepancies between the various fourth-century accounts of the Pythagorean way of life suggest that there were disputes among fourth-century Pythagoreans as to the proper way of life and as to the teachings of Pythagoras himself.
        • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 20 September 2009 19:18 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
        • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
        • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy/Winter 2006) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

        ^ Life of Pythagoras (fragments quoted in Iamblichus etc.
        • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 20 September 2009 19:18 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
        • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
        • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy/Winter 2006) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

        (1999) ISBN 0-9653774-5-8
    • Above all things reverence thy self.
      Above all things, respect yourself.
      .Above the cloud with its shadow is the star with its light.^ Above the cloud with its shadow is the star with its light.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .Above all things reverence thyself.
  • Work at these things, practice them, these are the things you ought to desire; they are what will put you on the path of divine virtue — yes, by the one who entrusted our soul with the tetraktys, source of ever-flowing nature.^ Work at these things, practice them, these are the things you ought to desire; they are what will put you on the path of divine virtue — yes, by the one who entrusted our soul with the tetraktys , source of ever-flowing nature.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Above all things reverence thyself.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Above all things reverence thy Self .
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Pray to the gods for success and get to work.^ Pray to the gods for success and get to work.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • As quoted in Divine Harmony : The Life and Teachings of Pythagoras by John Strohmeier and Peter Westbrook.^ By directing that his disciples eat what the gods eat, Pythagoras implied that in order to awaken their divine nature, his followers should nourish themselves on life rather than on death.
      • The Precepts of Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.donaldtyson.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Secret Teachings of All Ages: The Life and Philosophy of Pythagoras Sacred Texts Esoteric Index Previous Next .
      • Secret Teachings of All Ages: The Life and Philosophy of Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.sacred-texts.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Plato credited Pythagoras with teaching a way of life, and many of Plato's ideas can be traced back to Pythagoras.
      • Greek Philosophers and Aristophanes by Sanderson Beck 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

      .(1999)
  • Practice justice in word and deed, and do not get in the habit of acting thoughtlessly about anything.
    • As quoted in Divine Harmony : The Life and Teachings of Pythagoras by John Strohmeier and Peter Westbrook.^ As quoted in Divine Harmony : The Life and Teachings of Pythagoras by John Strohmeier and Peter Westbrook (1999) There is geometry in the humming of the strings.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Quotes about Pythagoras .
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Practice justice in word and deed, and do not get in the habit of acting thoughtlessly about anything.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .(1999)
  • Know that death comes to everyone, and that wealth will sometimes be acquired, sometimes lost. Whatever griefs mortals suffer by divine chance, whatever destiny you have, endure it and do not complain.^ Know that death comes to everyone, and that wealth will sometimes be acquired, sometimes lost.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Whatever griefs mortals suffer by divine chance, whatever destiny you have, endure it and do not complain.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Do you know where it comes from?
    • Harmonics, Music, Pythagoras and the Universe 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC ray.tomes.biz [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .But it is right to improve it as much as you can, and remember this: Fate does not give very many of these griefs to good people.^ Socrates later explained that the Thirty gave these commands to people in order to implicate as many as possible in their crimes.
    • Greek Philosophers and Aristophanes by Sanderson Beck 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I would very much like to hear from you (and others) what keys or pieces of music affect each chakra.
    • Harmonics, Music, Pythagoras and the Universe 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC ray.tomes.biz [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ These lectures contain the very essence of Pythagorean philosophy, and include so much practical commonsense that they are still quoted.
    • Little Journeys Vol. 10: Great Teachers by Elbert Hubbard: Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.online-literature.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • As quoted in Divine Harmony : The Life and Teachings of Pythagoras by John Strohmeier and Peter Westbrook.^ By directing that his disciples eat what the gods eat, Pythagoras implied that in order to awaken their divine nature, his followers should nourish themselves on life rather than on death.
      • The Precepts of Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.donaldtyson.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Secret Teachings of All Ages: The Life and Philosophy of Pythagoras Sacred Texts Esoteric Index Previous Next .
      • Secret Teachings of All Ages: The Life and Philosophy of Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.sacred-texts.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Plato credited Pythagoras with teaching a way of life, and many of Plato's ideas can be traced back to Pythagoras.
      • Greek Philosophers and Aristophanes by Sanderson Beck 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

      .(1999)
  • Many words befall men, mean and noble alike; do not be astonished by them, nor allow yourself to be constrained.
    If a lie is told, bear with it gently.^ If a lie is told, bear with it gently.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Many words befall men, mean and noble alike; do not be astonished by them, nor allow yourself to be constrained.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Many examples can also be cited of how people have distorted the essence of the Teaching, because words have different meanings in different languages.
    • The Esoteric Pythagoras 20 September 2009 19:18 UTC www.reversespins.com [Source type: Original source]


    .But whatever I tell you, let it be done completely.^ But whatever I tell you, let it be done completely.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ [Edited: n-neko 18:37, 1 Jan 2006 (PST)] Note it doesn't tell you that you are doing right until you complete the puzzle.
    • Talk:Mistake Of Pythagoras - Valve Developer Community 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC developer.valvesoftware.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Let no one persuade you by word or deed to do or say whatever is not best for you.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]


    .Let no one persuade you by word or deed to do or say whatever is not best for you.
    • As quoted in Divine Harmony : The Life and Teachings of Pythagoras by John Strohmeier and Peter Westbrook.^ But whatever I tell you, let it be done completely.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Pythagoras Let no man by word or deed persuade you To do or to say that which is not best for you.
      • Greek Philosophers and Aristophanes by Sanderson Beck 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Let no one persuade you by word or deed to do or say whatever is not best for you.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .(1999)
  • Let not sleep fall upon thy eyes till thou has thrice reviewed the transactions of the past day. Where have I turned aside from rectitude?^ Where have I turned aside from rectitude?
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Let not sleep fall upon thy eyes till thou has thrice reviewed the transactions of the past day.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ April 1750) by Samuel Johnson Let not sleep e'er close thy eyes Without thou ask thyself: What have I omitted and what done?
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    What have I been doing? .What have I left undone, which I ought to have done?^ What have I left undone, which I ought to have done?
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Begin thus from the first act, and proceed; and, in conclusion, at the ill which thou hast done, be troubled, and rejoice for the good.^ Begin thus from the first act, and proceed; and, in conclusion, at the ill which thou hast done, be troubled, and rejoice for the good.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • As translated in The Rambler No.^ As translated in The Rambler No.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .8 (14 April 1750) by Samuel Johnson
    • Let not sleep e'er close thy eyes
      Without thou ask thyself: What have I omitted and what done?^ April 1750) by Samuel Johnson Let not sleep e'er close thy eyes Without thou ask thyself: What have I omitted and what done?
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ As translated by Fabre d'Olivet Do not let sleep close your tired eyes until you have three times gone over the events of the day.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Let not sleep fall upon thy eyes till thou has thrice reviewed the transactions of the past day.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]


      .Abstain thou if 'tis evil; persevere if good.
    • Do not let sleep close your tired eyes until you have three times gone over the events of the day.^ Abstain thou if 'tis evil; persevere if good.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ As translated by Fabre d'Olivet Do not let sleep close your tired eyes until you have three times gone over the events of the day.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ April 1750) by Samuel Johnson Let not sleep e'er close thy eyes Without thou ask thyself: What have I omitted and what done?
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      'What did I do wrong? What did I accomplish? .What did I fail to do that I should have done?'^ What did I fail to do that I should have done?'
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .Starting from the beginning, go through to the end.^ Starting from the beginning, go through to the end.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ The problem was that after applying these ratios repeatedly he was able to move through the whole scale and end up back where he started...
      • Harmonics, Music, Pythagoras and the Universe 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC ray.tomes.biz [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      .Then, reproach yourself for the things you did wrong, and take pleasure in the good things you did.^ Then, reproach yourself for the things you did wrong, and take pleasure in the good things you did.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ The course of justice, industry, courage, moderation, silence, means that you shall receive your due of every good thing.
      • Little Journeys Vol. 10: Great Teachers by Elbert Hubbard: Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.online-literature.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ And once, when he was asked when a man might indulge in the pleasures of love, he replied, "Whenever you wish to be weaker than yourself."
      • Diogenes Laertius, Life of Pythagoras, from Lives of the Philosophers, translated by C.D. Yonge 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.classicpersuasion.org [Source type: Original source]

      .
      • As quoted in Divine Harmony : The Life and Teachings of Pythagoras by John Strohmeier and Peter Westbrook.^ By directing that his disciples eat what the gods eat, Pythagoras implied that in order to awaken their divine nature, his followers should nourish themselves on life rather than on death.
        • The Precepts of Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.donaldtyson.com [Source type: Original source]

        ^ Secret Teachings of All Ages: The Life and Philosophy of Pythagoras Sacred Texts Esoteric Index Previous Next .
        • Secret Teachings of All Ages: The Life and Philosophy of Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.sacred-texts.com [Source type: Original source]

        ^ Plato credited Pythagoras with teaching a way of life, and many of Plato's ideas can be traced back to Pythagoras.
        • Greek Philosophers and Aristophanes by Sanderson Beck 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

        .(1999)
  • Meditate upon my counsels; love them; follow them;
    To the divine virtues will they know how to lead thee.

    I swear it by the One who in our hearts engraved
    The sacred Tetrad, symbol immense and pure,
    Source of Nature and model of the Gods.^ Meditate upon my counsels; love them; follow them; To the divine virtues will they know how to lead thee.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I swear it by the One who in our hearts engraved The sacred Tetrad , symbol immense and pure, Source of Nature and model of the Gods.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Meditate upon my counsels; love them; follow them; To the divine virtues will they know how to lead thee...
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
  • Holding fast to these things, you will know the worlds of gods and mortals which permeates and governs everything.^ Holding fast to these things, you will know the worlds of gods and mortals which permeates and governs everything.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ As translated by Fabre d'Olivet Holding fast to these things, you will know the worlds of gods and mortals which permeates and governs everything.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Pythagorean Ethical Sentences From Stobæus" (1904) Despise all those things which when liberated from the body you will not want; invoke the Gods to become your helpers.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .And you will know, as is right, nature similar in all respects, so that you will neither entertain unreasonable hopes nor be neglectful of anything.
    • As quoted in Divine Harmony : The Life and Teachings of Pythagoras by John Strohmeier and Peter Westbrook.^ You will know, as is right, nature similar in all respects, so that you will neither entertain unreasonable hopes nor be neglectful of anything.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ As quoted in Divine Harmony : The Life and Teachings of Pythagoras by John Strohmeier and Peter Westbrook (1999) There is geometry in the humming of the strings.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ And you will know, as is right, nature similar in all respects, so that you will neither entertain unreasonable hopes nor be neglectful of anything.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .(1999)
  • You will know that wretched men are the cause of their own suffering, who neither see nor hear the good that is near them, and few are the ones who know how to secure release from their troubles. Such is the fate that harms their minds; like pebbles they are tossed about from one thing to another with cares unceasing.^ Knowledge is one thing--palaver another.
    • Little Journeys Vol. 10: Great Teachers by Elbert Hubbard: Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.online-literature.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Such is the fate that harms their minds; like pebbles they are tossed about from one thing to another with cares unceasing.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ You will know that wretched men are the cause of their own suffering, who neither see nor hear the good that is near them, and few are the ones who know how to secure release from their troubles.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .For the dread companion Strife harms them unawares, whom one must not walk behind, but withdraw from and flee.^ For the dread companion Strife harms them unawares, whom one must not walk behind, but withdraw from and flee.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ One must procreate children, [since one should leave behind him persons who will serve God].Iamblichus, D. 464-22 .

    ^ When he was sitting with some of his companions in Milo's house, some one of those whom he did not think worthy of admission into it, was excited by envy to set fire to it.
    • Diogenes Laertius, Life of Pythagoras, from Lives of the Philosophers, translated by C.D. Yonge 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.classicpersuasion.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • As quoted in Divine Harmony : The Life and Teachings of Pythagoras by John Strohmeier and Peter Westbrook (1999)
  • There is geometry in the humming of the strings.^ As quoted in Divine Harmony : The Life and Teachings of Pythagoras by John Strohmeier and Peter Westbrook (1999) There is geometry in the humming of the strings.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ There is geometry in the humming of the strings, there is music in the spacing of the spheres.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ By directing that his disciples eat what the gods eat, Pythagoras implied that in order to awaken their divine nature, his followers should nourish themselves on life rather than on death.
    • The Precepts of Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.donaldtyson.com [Source type: Original source]

    .There is music in the spacings of the spheres
    .^ There is music in the spacings of the spheres .
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ There is geometry in the humming of the strings, there is music in the spacing of the spheres.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    • As quoted in the preface of the book entitled Music of the Spheres by Guy Murchie (1961)

Florilegium

Remind yourself that all men assert that wisdom is the greatest good, but that there are few who strenuously seek out that greatest good.
Wind indeed increases fire, but custom love.
Quotes of Pythagoras from the Florilegium of Stobaeus, using various translations, including those from "Pythagorean Ethical Sentences From Stobæus" in The Golden Verses of Pythagoras and other Pythagorean Fragments (1904) Selected and arranged by Florence M. Firth
.
  • Do not even think of doing what ought not to be done.
    • "Pythagorean Ethical Sentences From Stobæus" (1904)
  • Choose rather to be strong in soul than in body.^ Socrates again risked death rather than do something unjust or unholy, as even the strong arm of that oppressive government could not frighten him into doing wrong.
    • Greek Philosophers and Aristophanes by Sanderson Beck 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I myself would wish neither; but if it were necessary either to do wrong or to be wronged, I should choose rather to be wronged than to do wrong.
    • Greek Philosophers and Aristophanes by Sanderson Beck 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The soul is more valuable than the body; therefore keeping it in balance through justice is more important than physical pain and will lead to true happiness.
    • Greek Philosophers and Aristophanes by Sanderson Beck 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • "Pythagorean Ethical Sentences From Stobæus" (1904)
    • Choose rather to be strong of soul than strong of body.^ "Pythagorean Ethical Sentences From Stobæus" (1904) Choose rather to be strong of soul than strong of body.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ "Pythagorean Ethical Sentences From Stobæus" (1904) Choose rather to be strong in soul than in body.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ "Pythagorean Ethical Sentences From Stobæus" (1904) It is requisite to defend those who are unjustly accused of having acted injuriously, but to praise those who excel in a certain good.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .
      • As quoted in Florilegium, I.22, as translated in Dictionary of Quotations (1906) by Thomas Benfield Harbottle, p.^ As quoted in Florilegium , XVIII, 23, as translated in Dictionary of Quotations (1906) by Thomas Benfield Harbottle, p.
        • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
        • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

        ^ Dictionary of Quotations (1906) by Thomas Benfield Harbottle, p.
        • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
        • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

        ^ As quoted in Aurea Carmina by Hierocles of Alexandria , as translated in Dictionary of Quotations (1906) by Thomas Benfield Harbottle, p.
        • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
        • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

        .396
  • It is difficult to walk at one and the same time many paths of life.^ It is difficult to walk at one and the same time many paths of life.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ XXV. And there were four men of the name of Pythagoras, about the same time, at no great distance from one another.
    • Diogenes Laertius, Life of Pythagoras, from Lives of the Philosophers, translated by C.D. Yonge 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.classicpersuasion.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ C. D. Yonge (1853) We ought so to behave to one another as to avoid making enemies of our friends, and at the same time to make friends of our enemies.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • "Pythagorean Ethical Sentences From Stobæus" (1904)
  • It is requisite to choose the most excellent life; for custom will make it pleasant. Wealth is an infirm anchor, glory is still more infirm; and in a similar manner, the body, dominion, and honour.^ "Pythagorean Ethical Sentences From Stobæus" (1904) It is requisite to choose the most excellent life; for custom will make it pleasant.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Pythagorean Ethical Sentences From Stobæus" (1904) Choose rather to be strong of soul than strong of body.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Pythagorean Ethical Sentences From Stobæus" (1904) Choose rather to be strong in soul than in body.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    For all these are imbecile and powerless. What then are powerful anchors. .Prudence, magnanimity, fortitude.^ Prudence, magnanimity, fortitude.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .These no tempest can shake.^ These no tempest can shake.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .This is the Law of God, that virtue is the only thing that is strong; and that every thing else is a trifle.^ This is the Law of God, that virtue is the only thing that is strong; and that every thing else is a trifle.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Virtue, health, all good and God are harmonious, and therefore all things are constructed according to the laws of harmony.
    • Greek Philosophers and Aristophanes by Sanderson Beck 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ When sacrificing to the celestial gods, we should offer only spiritual sacrifices - that is, things that cannot be divided because they are not material in nature.
    • The Precepts of Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.donaldtyson.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • "Pythagorean Ethical Sentences From Stobæus" (1904)
  • It is requisite to defend those who are unjustly accused of having acted injuriously, but to praise those who excel in a certain good.
    • "Pythagorean Ethical Sentences From Stobæus" (1904)
  • Neither will the horse be adjudged to be generous, that is sumptuously adorned, but the horse whose nature is illustrious; nor is the man worthy who possesses great wealth, but he whose soul is generous.^ "Pythagorean Ethical Sentences From Stobæus" (1904) Choose rather to be strong of soul than strong of body.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Pythagorean Ethical Sentences From Stobæus" (1904) Choose rather to be strong in soul than in body.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Pythagorean Ethical Sentences From Stobæus" (1904) Those alone are dear to Divinity who are hostile to injustice.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • "Pythagorean Ethical Sentences From Stobæus" (1904)
  • When the wise man opens his mouth, the beauties of his soul present themselves to the view, like the statues in a temple
    • "Pythagorean Ethical Sentences From Stobæus" (1904)
  • Remind yourself that all men assert that wisdom is the greatest good, but that there are few who strenuously seek out that greatest good.
    • "Pythagorean Ethical Sentences From Stobæus" (1904)
  • Despise all those things which when liberated from the body you will not want; invoke the Gods to become your helpers.^ "Pythagorean Ethical Sentences From Stobæus" (1904) Despise all those things which when liberated from the body you will not want; invoke the Gods to become your helpers.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Pythagorean Ethical Sentences From Stobæus" (1904) Choose rather to be strong of soul than strong of body.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Pythagorean Ethical Sentences From Stobæus" (1904) Choose rather to be strong in soul than in body.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • "Pythagorean Ethical Sentences From Stobæus" (1904)
  • Wind indeed increases fire, but custom love.
    • "Pythagorean Ethical Sentences From Stobæus" (1904)
  • Those alone are dear to Divinity who are hostile to injustice.^ "Pythagorean Ethical Sentences From Stobæus" (1904) Those alone are dear to Divinity who are hostile to injustice.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Pythagorean Ethical Sentences From Stobæus" (1904) None can be free who is a slave to, and ruled by, his passions.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Pythagorean Ethical Sentences From Stobæus" (1904) Wind indeed increases fire, but custom love.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • "Pythagorean Ethical Sentences From Stobæus" (1904)
  • None can be free who is a slave to, and ruled by, his passions.
    • As quoted in Florilegium, XVIII, 23, as translated in Dictionary of Quotations (1906) by Thomas Benfield Harbottle, p.^ As quoted in Florilegium , XVIII, 23, as translated in Dictionary of Quotations (1906) by Thomas Benfield Harbottle, p.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Dictionary of Quotations (1906) by Thomas Benfield Harbottle, p.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ "Pythagorean Ethical Sentences From Stobæus" (1904) Those alone are dear to Divinity who are hostile to injustice.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .368
    • No one is free who has not obtained the empire of himself.^ No one is free who has not obtained the empire of himself.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Charles Varle No man is free who cannot control himself.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ One who does not speak cannot betray himself.
      • The Precepts of Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.donaldtyson.com [Source type: Original source]

      .
      • As translated by Nicholas Rowe(1732)
    • No man is free who cannot command himself.^ Charles Varle No man is free who cannot control himself.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ As translated by Nicholas Rowe(1732) No man is free who cannot command himself.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ No one is free who has not obtained the empire of himself.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .
      • As quoted in Moral Encyclopaedia, Or, Varlé's Self-instructor, No.^ As quoted in Moral Encyclopaedia, Or, Varlé's Self-instructor, No.
        • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
        • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

        .3
        (1831) by by Charles Varle
    • No man is free who cannot control himself.^ Charles Varle No man is free who cannot control himself.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ As translated by Nicholas Rowe(1732) No man is free who cannot command himself.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ No one is free who has not obtained the empire of himself.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .
      • As quoted in 25 Days to Better Thinking & Better Living : A Guide for Improving Every Aspect of Your Life (2006) by Linda Elder and Richard Paul
  • It is not proper either to have a blunt sword or to use freedom of speech ineffectually.^ As quoted in 25 Days to Better Thinking & Better Living : A Guide for Improving Every Aspect of Your Life (2006) by Linda Elder and Richard Paul It is not proper either to have a blunt sword or to use freedom of speech ineffectually.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Tiffany pose la question : I was wondering if you have any real-life uses of the pythagorean theorem that you use in your everyday life.

    ^ Speak what you think now in hard words, and to-morrow speak what to-morrow thinks in hard words again, though it contradict every thing you said to-day.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]


    .Neither is the sun to be taken from the world, nor freedom of speech from erudition.
  • Not frequently man from man.^ As quoted in the translation of Thomas Taylor (1818) Not frequently man from man.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Neither is the sun to be taken from the world, nor freedom of speech from erudition.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The next proof is taken verbatim from Euclid VI.31 in translation by Sir Thomas L. Heath.
    • Pythagorean Theorem and its many proofs from Interactive Mathematics Miscellany and Puzzles 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.cut-the-knot.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    • As quoted in the translation of Thomas Taylor (1818); This has been interpreted as being an exhortation to moderation in homosexual liaisons.

The Sayings of the Wise (1555)

Dispose thy Soul to all good and necessary things!
True and perfect Friendship is, to make one heart and mind of many hearts and bodies.
.
If thou intend to do any good; tarry not till to-morrow!
^ If thou intend to do any good; tarry not till to-morrow!
  • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

for thou knowest not what may chance thee this night.
.
Wisdom thoroughly learned, will never be forgotten.
^ Wisdom thoroughly learned, will never be forgotten.
  • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]


Science is got by diligence; but Discretion and Wisdom cometh of GOD.
Reason not with him, that will deny the principal truths!
Quotes of Pythagoras as translated in The Sayings of the Wise : Or, Food for Thought : A Book of Moral Wisdom, Gathered from the Ancient Philosophers (1555) by William Baldwin [1908 edition]
.
  • When a reasonable Soul forsaketh his divine nature, and becometh beast-like, it dieth.^ Quotes of Pythagoras as translated in The Sayings of the Wise : Or, Food for Thought : A Book of Moral Wisdom, Gathered from the Ancient Philosophers (1555) by William Baldwin [1908 edition] When a reasonable Soul forsaketh his divine nature, and becometh beast-like, it dieth.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .For though the substance of the Soul be incorruptible: yet, lacking the use of Reason, it is reputed dead; for it loseth the Intellective Life.
  • A good Soul hath neither too great joy, nor too great sorrow: for it rejoiceth in goodness; and it sorroweth in wickedness.^ For though the substance of the Soul be incorruptible: yet, lacking the use of Reason, it is reputed dead; for it loseth the Intellective Life.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A good Soul hath neither too great joy, nor too great sorrow: for it rejoiceth in goodness; and it sorroweth in wickedness.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Thus adorned with courageous pride and reverence, he has a pleasant life for his soul though he be dead, if indeed Pythagoras was truly wise, who beyond all knew and searched out the thoughts of men.
    • Was Pythagoras Ever Really in Sparta? | Issue #06 | Rosetta 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.rosetta.bham.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .By the means whereof, when it beholdeth all things, and seeth the good and bad so mingled together, it can neither rejoice greatly; nor be grieved with over much sorrow.
  • Order thyself so, that thy Soul may always be in good estate; whatsoever become of thy body.
  • Dispose thy Soul to all good and necessary things!
  • Patience cometh by the grace of the Soul.
  • True and perfect Friendship is, to make one heart and mind of many hearts and bodies.
  • He is not rich, that enjoyeth not his own goods.
  • By Silence, the discretion of a man is known : and a fool, keeping Silence, seemeth to be wise.
  • A fool is known by his Speech; and a wise man by Silence.
  • The King that followeth Truth, and ruleth according to Justice, shall reign quietly: but he that doth the contrary, seeketh another to reign for him.
  • Tell not abroad what thou intendest to do; for if thou speed not, thou shalt be mocked!
  • If thy fellows hurt thee in small things, suffer it!^ By the means whereof, when it beholdeth all things, and seeth the good and bad so mingled together, it can neither rejoice greatly; nor be grieved with over much sorrow.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ True and perfect Friendship is, to make one heart and mind of many hearts and bodies.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Patience cometh by the grace of the Soul.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    and be as bold with them!
  • .
  • Take not thine enemy for thy friend; nor thy friend for thine enemy!
  • Rejoice not in another man's misfortune!
  • Let thy mind rule thy tongue!
  • Hear gladly!
  • Attempt nothing above thy strength!
  • Be not hasty to speak; nor slow to hear!
  • Wish not the thing, which thou mayest not obtain!
  • If thou intend to do any good; tarry not till to-morrow!^ Take not thine enemy for thy friend; nor thy friend for thine enemy!
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Attempt nothing above thy strength!
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Wish not the thing, which thou mayest not obtain!
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    for thou knowest not what may chance thee this night.
  • .
  • Use examples; that such as thou teachest may understand thee the better!
  • Reason not with him, that will deny the principal truths!
  • Honor Wisdom; and deny it not to them that would learn; and shew it unto them that dispraise it!^ Science is got by diligence; but Discretion and Wisdom cometh of GOD. Reason not with him, that will deny the principal truths!
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Reason not with him, that will deny the principal truths!
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Honor Wisdom; and deny it not to them that would learn; and shew it unto them that dispraise it!
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Sow not the sea fields!
  • Wisdom thoroughly learned, will never be forgotten.
    Science is got by diligence; but Discretion and Wisdom cometh of GOD.
  • Without Justice, no realm may prosper.
  • Happy is that City that hath a wise man to govern it.
  • To use Virtue is perfect blessedness.
  • Envy has been, is, and shall be, the destruction of many.^ Science is got by diligence; but Discretion and Wisdom cometh of GOD. Reason not with him, that will deny the principal truths!
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ To use Virtue is perfect blessedness.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Science is got by diligence; but Discretion and Wisdom cometh of GOD. Without Justice, no realm may prosper.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .What is there, that Envy hath not defamed, or Malice left undefiled?^ What is there, that Envy hath not defamed, or Malice left undefiled?
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    Truly, no good thing.
  • A solitary man is a God, or a beast.
  • None but a Craftsman can judge of a craft.
  • Repentance deserveth Pardon.
  • The best and greatest winning is a true friend; and the greatest loss is the loss of time.
  • It is better to suffer, than to do, wrong.
  • He is worst of all, that is malicious against his friends.
  • Evil destroyeth itself.
  • Better be mute, than dispute with the Ignorant.

Disputed

.
Virtue is harmony.
  • Virtue is harmony.
    • This is often published as a direct quote of Pythagoras, but seems to be derived from the account of Diogenes Laertius of Pythagorean doctrines, where he simply describes the statement as a precept of his followers.^ Pythagorean Memoirs are quoted by Diogenes Laertius .
      • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 20 September 2009 19:18 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ This is often published as a direct quote of Pythagoras, but seems to be derived from the account of Diogenes Laertius of Pythagorean doctrines, where he simply describes the statement as a precept of his followers.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Diogenes Laertius, Pythagoras 8:18 tr.
      • Greek Philosophers and Aristophanes by Sanderson Beck 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

      In the translation of C. D. Yonge (1853) it is rendered, in regard to Pythagoreans:
They also say, that the most important privilege in man is, the being able to persuade his soul to either good or bad. And that men are happy when they have a good soul; yet, that they are never quiet, and that they never retain the same mind long. Also, that an oath is justice; and that on that account, Jupiter is called Jupiter of Oaths. Also, that virtue is harmony, and health, and universal good, and .God; on which account everything owes its existence and consistency to harmony. Also, that friendship is a harmonious equality.^ Also, that virtue is harmony, and health, and universal good, and God; on which account everything owes its existence and consistency to harmony.
  • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Friendship is harmony and equality.
  • Greek Philosophers and Aristophanes by Sanderson Beck 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Also, that friendship is a harmonious equality.
  • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

Misattributed

.
  • There is nothing so easy but that it becomes difficult when you do it reluctantly.^ There is nothing so easy but that it becomes difficult when you do it reluctantly.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Terence, in Heauton Timoroumenos [The Self-Tormentor]
  • Concern should drive us into action and not into a depression.^ Terence , in Heauton Timoroumenos [ The Self-Tormentor ] Concern should drive us into action and not into a depression.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "We may feel genuinely concerned about world conditions, though such a concern should drive us into action and not into a depression."
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • The Collected Works of Karen Horney‎ (1957) by Karen Horney, p.^ The Collected Works of Karen Horney‎ (1957) by Karen Horney, p.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      154 : "We may feel genuinely concerned about world conditions, though such a concern should drive us into action and not into a depression."

Quotes about Pythagoras

It was Pythagoras who first called heaven kosmos, because it is perfect, and "adorned" with infinite beauty and living beings.
.
Even the seeming remoteness of Pythagorean teaching helps one to realize that the current world view, while it seems destined to dominate the planet, is fleeting and temporary and, like others before it, will pass.
  • It was Pythagoras who first called heaven kosmos, because it is perfect, and "adorned" with infinite beauty and living beings.
    • The Life of Pythagoras by an unknown ancient author, as quoted in The Pythagorean Sourcebook and Library : An Anthology of Ancient Writings which Relate to Pythagoras and Pythagorean Philosophy (1919); also quoted in The Golden Chain : An Anthology of Pythagorean and Platonic Philosophy (2004) by Algis Uzdavinys, p.^ Porphyry of Tyre , in "The Life of Pythagoras" as translated by Kenneth Sylvan Guthrie in The Pythagorean Sourcebook and Library : An Anthology of Ancient Writings which Relate to Pythagoras and Pythagorean Philosophy (1919); also quoted in The Golden Chain : An Anthology of Pythagorean and Platonic Philosophy (2004) by Algis Uzdavinys Such things taught he, though advising above all things to speak the truth, for this alone deifies men.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ It was Pythagoras who first called heaven kosmos , because it is perfect, and "adorned" with infinite beauty and living beings.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Even the seeming remoteness of Pythagorean teaching helps one to realize that the current world view, while it seems destined to dominate the planet, is fleeting and temporary and, like others before it, will pass.
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .4
  • The first man to call himself a philosopher (philosophos 'lover of wisdom') is Pythagoras, whose mystical system of mathematics combines some genuine scientific analysis with much other-worldly speculation.^ Some could call a man like Clifford obsessed.
    • The Math Book: From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension, 250 Milestones in the History of Mathematics 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC sprott.physics.wisc.edu [Source type: Academic]

    ^ Instead of calling himself wise, he pursued wisdom through friendship and therefore called himself a philosopher, possibly the first to do so.
    • Greek Philosophers and Aristophanes by Sanderson Beck 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ However I will hope to show you that there is much evidence that the universe is completely organised on a system of mathematical harmony and that it shows up in every branch of scientific study.
    • Harmonics, Music, Pythagoras and the Universe 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC ray.tomes.biz [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .
  • Ten is the very nature of number.^ "The beginnings of Greek philosophy: c.500 BC" at History World Ten is the very nature of number.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Burkert begins his treatise on this enigmatic philosopher writing that ‘Over the origins of Greek philosophy and science lies the shadow of a great traditional name’, [1] that is: Pythagoras of Samos (c.
    • Was Pythagoras Ever Really in Sparta? | Issue #06 | Rosetta 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.rosetta.bham.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Certainly the Pythagorean Society expanded rapidly after 500 BC, became political in nature and also spilt into a number of factions.
    • Pythagoras & Theano - The Order of Nazorean Essenes 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC essenes.net [Source type: Original source]

    .All Greeks and all barbarians alike count up to ten, and having reached ten revert again to the unity.^ All Greeks and all barbarians alike count up to ten, and having reached ten revert again to the unity.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And he says that the starting-point of number is the decad; for all Greeks and all barbarians count as far as ten, and when they get as far as this they return to the monad.
    • Pythagoras & Theano - The Order of Nazorean Essenes 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC essenes.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Number is the first principle, a thing which is undefined, incomprehensible, having in itself all numbers which could reach infinity in amount.
    • Pythagoras & Theano - The Order of Nazorean Essenes 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC essenes.net [Source type: Original source]

    And again, Pythagoras maintains, the power of the number 10 lies in the number 4, the tetrad. .This is the reason: if one starts at the unit (1) and adds the successive number up to 4, one will make up the number 10 (1+2+3+4 = 10).^ If you set out the numbers from 1 to 24 (or 48 or 60 or 144) and then make a bigger mark beside all the ones that have many factors then you get interesting rhythms.
    • Harmonics, Music, Pythagoras and the Universe 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC ray.tomes.biz [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Rajesh pose la question : There are 10 squares drawn one inside another.The diagonal of the inneremost square is 20 units.

    ^ These three numbers, of course, make up the most basic of ‘Pythagorean’ triangles, where the hypotenuse is five and the sides are four and three.
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy/Winter 2006) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .And if one exceeds the tetrad, one will exceed 10 too....^ And if one exceeds the tetrad, one will exceed 10 too....
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .So that the number by the unit resides in the number 10, but potentially in the number 4. And so the Pythagoreans used to invoke the Tetrad as their most binding oath: "By him that gave to our generation the Tetractys, which contains the fount and root of eternal nature..."
  • Whenever he heard a person who was making use of his symbols, he immediately took him into his circle, and made him a friend.^ So that the number by the unit resides in the number 10, but potentially in the number 4.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And so the Pythagoreans used to invoke the Tetrad as their most binding oath: "By him that gave to our generation the Tetractys , which contains the fount and root of eternal nature..."
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Aëtius of Antioch Aëtius (I. 3.8) Whenever he heard a person who was making use of his symbols, he immediately took him into his circle, and made him a friend.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Aristoxenus, as quoted in Birth of the Symbol : Ancient Readers at the Limits of Their Texts (2004) by Peter Struck
  • Pythagoras was said to have been the first man to call himself philosopher; in fact, the world is indebted to him for the word philosopher. Before that time the wise men called themselves sages, which was interpreted to mean those who know.^ Pythagoras said that time is the sphere of what surrounds the world.
    • Pythagoras & Theano - The Order of Nazorean Essenes 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC essenes.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A couple of bits, in translation, follow: Music was numbered by the ancients among the arts that are called liberal, that is, worthy of a free man, and among the Greeks its masters and discoverers, like those of almost all the other sciences, were always in great esteem.
    • Harmonics, Music, Pythagoras and the Universe 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC ray.tomes.biz [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Thus adorned with courageous pride and reverence, he has a pleasant life for his soul though he be dead, if indeed Pythagoras was truly wise, who beyond all knew and searched out the thoughts of men.
    • Was Pythagoras Ever Really in Sparta? | Issue #06 | Rosetta 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.rosetta.bham.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .Pythagoras was more modest.^ Pythagoras was more modest.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In a more general sense, Pythagoras is counseling modest behavior.
    • The Precepts of Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.donaldtyson.com [Source type: Original source]

    .He coined the word philosopher, which he defined as one who is attempting to find out.^ One of the manifestations of the attempt to glorify Pythagoras in the later tradition is the report that he, in fact, invented the word philosophy.
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Philosopher / Philosophy                    Philosopher - One who philosophizes; one versed in, or devoted to, philosophy.
    • "Natural Magick" - "Glossary/Index - P" 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC homepages.tscnet.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
  • A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds, adored by little statesmen and philosophers and divines. With consistency a great soul has simply nothing to do.^ Pythagoras : The First Philosopher and Discoverer of the Forty-seventh Problem of Euclid (2005) by Grover W. Brunton A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds, adored by little statesmen and philosophers and divines.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ With consistency a great soul has simply nothing to do.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Pythagoras held that one of the first principles, the monad, is god and the good, which is the origin of the One, and is itself intelligence; but the undefined dyad is a divinity and the bad, surrounding which is the mass of matter.
    • Pythagoras & Theano - The Order of Nazorean Essenes 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC essenes.net [Source type: Original source]

    He may as well concern himself with his shadow on the wall. .Speak what you think now in hard words, and to-morrow speak what to-morrow thinks in hard words again, though it contradict every thing you said to-day.^ What you think about and identify deductively, these things represent useful knowledge, what you "sniff" or casually inspect through the sense can do you harm.

    ^ Maintain a state of preparation every day that is the same as the condition you would strive to attain if you knew that your death was imminent.
    • The Precepts of Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.donaldtyson.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In a general sense, this precept means that you should avoid those things that generate corruption and foulness, even though they seem palatable in the beginning.
    • The Precepts of Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.donaldtyson.com [Source type: Original source]

    ."Ah, so you shall be sure to be misunderstood."^ "Ah, so you shall be sure to be misunderstood."
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    — Is it so bad, then, to be misunderstood? .Pythagoras was misunderstood, and Socrates, and Jesus, and Luther, and Copernicus, and Galileo, and Newton, and every pure and wise spirit that ever took flesh.^ Pythagoras was misunderstood , and Socrates , and Jesus , and Luther , and Copernicus , and Galileo , and Newton , and every pure and wise spirit that ever took flesh.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Pythagoras is saying, leave your old, dead life in the flesh behind you and take up a new life in the spirit.
    • The Precepts of Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.donaldtyson.com [Source type: Original source]

    .To be great is to be misunderstood.
  • Pythagoras was indeed the first man to call himself a philosopher.^ Ralph Waldo Emerson in Self-Reliance (1841) Pythagoras was indeed the first man to call himself a philosopher.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The first man to call himself a philosopher ( philosophos 'lover of wisdom') is Pythagoras, whose mystical system of mathematics combines some genuine scientific analysis with much other-worldly speculation.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Aristoxenus , as quoted in Birth of the Symbol : Ancient Readers at the Limits of Their Texts (2004) by Peter Struck Pythagoras was said to have been the first man to call himself philosopher; in fact, the world is indebted to him for the word philosopher .
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Others before had called themselves wise (sophos), but Pythagoras was the the first to call himself a philosopher, literally a lover of wisdom.

    More importantly, for Pythagoras and his followers philosophy was not merely an intellectual pursuit, but a way of life, the aim of which was the assimilation to God.^ Others before had called themselves wise ( sophos ), but Pythagoras was the the first to call himself a philosopher, literally a lover of wisdom.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Instead of calling himself wise, he pursued wisdom through friendship and therefore called himself a philosopher, possibly the first to do so.
    • Greek Philosophers and Aristophanes by Sanderson Beck 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ More importantly, for Pythagoras and his followers philosophy was not merely an intellectual pursuit, but a way of life , the aim of which was the assimilation to God.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Kenneth Sylvan Guthrie and David R. Fideler in The Pythagorean Sourcebook and Library : An Anthology of Ancient Writings which Relate to Pythagoras and Pythagorean Philosophy (1919)
  • Pythagoras, the son of Mnesarchus, was the most learned of all men of history; and having selected from these writings, he thus formed his own wisdom and extensive learning, and mischievous art.^ Kenneth Sylvan Guthrie and David R. Fideler in The Pythagorean Sourcebook and Library : An Anthology of Ancient Writings which Relate to Pythagoras and Pythagorean Philosophy (1919) Pythagoras, the son of Mnesarchus, was the most learned of all men of history; and having selected from these writings, he thus formed his own wisdom and extensive learning, and mischievous art.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Pythagoras was a man; and with all his imperfections on his head, we shall look among the race of men, for his better, in yain, yea, for his equal, or his second, but in vain.
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras - Wikiquote 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Thus adorned with courageous pride and reverence, he has a pleasant life for his soul though he be dead, if indeed Pythagoras was truly wise, who beyond all knew and searched out the thoughts of men.
    • Was Pythagoras Ever Really in Sparta? | Issue #06 | Rosetta 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.rosetta.bham.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

  • Pythagoras conceived that the first attention that should be given to men should be addressed to the senses, as when one perceives beautiful figures and forms, or hears beautiful rhythms and melodies. Consequently he laid down that the first erudition was that which subsists through music's melodies and rhythms, and from these he obtained remedies of human manners and passions, and restored the pristine harmony of the faculties of the soul. 
  • What appeared here, at the center of the Pythagorean tradition in philosophy, is another view of psyche that seems to owe little or nothing to the pan-vitalism or pan-deism (see theion) that is the legacy of the Milesians.^ This is the biographical tradition represented by the Lives of the Philosophers written by Diogenes Laertius.
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 20 September 2009 19:18 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy/Winter 2006) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Pythagorean Memoirs are quoted by Diogenes Laertius .
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 20 September 2009 19:18 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy/Winter 2006) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Life of Pythagoras (fragments quoted in Iamblichus etc.
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 20 September 2009 19:18 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy/Winter 2006) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    • Francis E. Peters, in Greek Philosophical Terms : A Historical Lexicon (NYU Press 1967), p. .169 ISBN: 0814765521
  • It was through philosophy, he said, that he had come to be surprised at nothing.
    • Plutarch in Recta Audiendi Rationa, XII, as quoted in
  • The following became universally known: first, that he maintains that the soul is immortal; second, that it changes into other kinds of living things; third, that events recur in certain cycles and that nothing is ever absolutely new; and fourth, that all living things sould be regarded as akin. Pythagoras seems to have been the first to bring these beliefs into Greece.^ And will not each other living thing also have meaning?

    ^ Dicaearchus comments that “what he said to his associates no one can say reliably,” but then identifies four doctrines that became well known: 1) that the soul is immortal; 2) that it transmigrates into other kinds of animals; 3) that after certain intervals the things that have happened once happen again, so that nothing is completely new; 4) that all animate beings belong to the same family (Porphyry, VP 19).
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 20 September 2009 19:18 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy/Winter 2006) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ This early evidence is emphatically confirmed by Dicaearchus in the fourth century, who first comments on the difficulty of determining what Pythagoras taught and then asserts that his most recognized doctrines were “that the soul is immortal and that it transmigrates into other kinds of animals” (Porphyry, VP 19).
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 20 September 2009 19:18 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy/Winter 2006) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .
  • He ordained that his disciples should speak well and think reverently of the Gods, muses and heroes, and likewise of parents and benefactors; that they should obey the laws; that they should not relegate the worship of the Gods to a secondary position, performing it eagerly, even at home; that to the celestial divinities they should sacrifice uncommon offerings; and ordinary ones to the inferior deities.^ He should be governed by law himself too by respecting the laws, and he should reverence the gods.
    • Greek Philosophers and Aristophanes by Sanderson Beck 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ XLIII. Sacrifice an odd number to the celestial gods, and to the infernal an even.
    • The Precepts of Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.donaldtyson.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Dacier believed that the meaning was that worshippers should adore the immensity of God by imitating the turning motion of the celestial spheres.
    • The Precepts of Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.donaldtyson.com [Source type: Original source]

    .(The world he Divided into) opposite powers; the "one" was a better monad, light, right, equal, stable and straight; while the "other" was an inferior duad, darkness, left, unequal, unstable and movable.^ What is the length of segment AB? Segment AB is a straight line from the top left corner of the cube to the lower right bottom corner Penny Nom lui rpond.

    ^ Alexandre has also observed that the Intersecting Chords theorem appears as Euclid III.35 : If in a circle two straight lines cut one another, then the rectangle contained by the segments of the one equals the rectangle contained by the segments of the other.
    • Pythagorean Theorem and its many proofs from Interactive Mathematics Miscellany and Puzzles 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.cut-the-knot.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ The radius of the circle equals now the altitude from the right angle C. Unlike in the other two proofs, there are now no exceptional cases.
    • Pythagorean Theorem and its many proofs from Interactive Mathematics Miscellany and Puzzles 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.cut-the-knot.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .
    • Porphyry of Tyre, in "The Life of Pythagoras" as translated by Kenneth Sylvan Guthrie in The Pythagorean Sourcebook and Library : An Anthology of Ancient Writings which Relate to Pythagoras and Pythagorean Philosophy (1919); also quoted in The Golden Chain : An Anthology of Pythagorean and Platonic Philosophy (2004) by Algis Uzdavinys
  • Such things taught he, though advising above all things to speak the truth, for this alone deifies men. For as he had learned from the Magi, who call God Oremasdes, God's body is light, and his soul is truth.^ Lectures on Pythagoreanism (fragments quoted in Porphyry) .
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 20 September 2009 19:18 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
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    ^ Pythagoreans believed that all relations could be reduced to number relations ("all things are numbers").
    • "Natural Magick" - "Glossary/Index - P" 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC homepages.tscnet.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Aristotle emphasized his superhuman nature in the following ways: there was a story that Pythagoras had a golden thigh (a sign of divinity); the people of Croton called him the Hyperborean Apollo (one of the god Apollo's manifestations); the Pythagoreans taught that “of rational beings, one sort is divine, one is human, and another such as Pythagoras” (Iamblichus, VP 31); Pythagoras was seen on the same day at the same time in both Metapontum and Croton; he killed a deadly snake by biting it; as he was crossing a river it spoke to him (all citations are from Aristotle, Fr.
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 20 September 2009 19:18 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
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    He taught much else, which he claimed to have learned from Aristoclea at Delphi. .
    • Porphyry of Tyre, as translated by Kenneth Sylvan Guthrie in The Pythagorean Sourcebook and Library : An Anthology of Ancient Writings which Relate to Pythagoras and Pythagorean Philosophy (1919); also quoted in The Golden Chain : An Anthology of Pythagorean and Platonic Philosophy (2004) by Algis Uzdavinys
    • Unsourced variant: Speak the truth in all situations.
  • Pythagoras was a teacher of the purest system of morals ever propounded to man.^ Lectures on Pythagoreanism (fragments quoted in Porphyry) .
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 20 September 2009 19:18 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
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    ^ All of these works were written at a time when Pythagoras’ achievements appear to have been heavily revised in order to serve various ideological ends.
    • Was Pythagoras Ever Really in Sparta? | Issue #06 | Rosetta 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.rosetta.bham.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Philolaus' system is nonetheless an intelligible development of the reverence for mathematical truth found in Pythagoras' own cosmological scheme, which is embodied in the acusmata .
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 20 September 2009 19:18 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
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  • Pythagoras was a man; and with all his imperfections on his head, we shall look among the race of men, for his better, in yain, yea, for his equal, or his second, but in vain. Pythagoras was entirely a Deist, a steady maintainer of the unity of God, and of the eternal obligations of moral virtue.^ One could almost say that God, or the Nature of the Universe, thinks in numbers, which notion probably would not have surprised Pythagoras at all.

    ^ It was this lifelong problem of self-knowing that Socrates was talking about, not a simple distinction between men and gods, as Herodotus and generations of Classical scholars have maintained.

    ^ In general terms Pythagoras advises that we should approach the gods in a spirit of humility, aware of our moral failings and shortcomings.
    • The Precepts of Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.donaldtyson.com [Source type: Original source]

    .No Christian writings, even to this day, can compete in sublimity and grandeur with what this illustrious philosopher has laid down concerning God, and the end of all our actions; and it is likely, says Bayle, that he would have carried his orthodoxy much farther, had he had the courage to expose himself to martyrdom.^ I would very much like to hear from you (and others) what keys or pieces of music affect each chakra.
    • Harmonics, Music, Pythagoras and the Universe 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC ray.tomes.biz [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ One morning, I typed in the equation of the butterfly not knowing what it would look like and departed down the hall for the coffee pot.
    • The Math Book: From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension, 250 Milestones in the History of Mathematics 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC sprott.physics.wisc.edu [Source type: Academic]

    ^ These, of course, are also Orphic notions that are handed down in Christian theology and which we unfortunately have no way of unravelling from what we know of the Caberoi of Thrace and what would be consistent to such notions, a concept of monotheism (e.g., the monotheistic Thracian Zalmoxis reported by Herodotus).
    • Harmonics, Music, Pythagoras and the Universe 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC ray.tomes.biz [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

  • It was a maxim of Pythagoras that the two most excellent things for man were to speak the truth, and to render benefits to each other.
    • Joseph Dame Weeks in History of the Knights of Pythias, with an Account of the Life and Times of Damon and Pythias (1874) The bolded portion of this has sometimes been presented as a quote of Pythagoras, but has not been found in this form in any existing translations of his statements.

Divine Harmony (1999)

.Divine Harmony : The Life and Teachings of Pythagoras by John Strohmeier and Peter Westbrook.^ Plato credited Pythagoras with teaching a way of life, and many of Plato's ideas can be traced back to Pythagoras.
  • Greek Philosophers and Aristophanes by Sanderson Beck 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Riedweg, Christoph, 2005, Pythagoras: His Life, Teaching and Influence , Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press.
  • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 20 September 2009 19:18 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
  • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ The discrepancies between the various fourth-century accounts of the Pythagorean way of life suggest that there were disputes among fourth-century Pythagoreans as to the proper way of life and as to the teachings of Pythagoras himself.
  • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 20 September 2009 19:18 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
  • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]

(1999) ISBN 0-9653774-5-8
.
The concept of a harmonious universe ordered according to "the Great Chain of Being" — a chain that connects the continuum of matter, body, mind, soul and spirit — stands as one of the most fundamental ideas of western thought.
  • Pythagoras stands at the fountainhead of our culture. The ideas he set in motion were, according to Daniel Boorstin, "among the most potent in modern history," resulting directly in many of the pillars upon which the modern world is built.^ Our minds should remain turned to matters of the spirit.
    • The Precepts of Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.donaldtyson.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Diet is one of the most basic ways of distinguishing culture, and the Pythagorean preferences may be in part an act of self-identification of the brotherhood as different from ordinary people.

    ^ And what duties did I leave unfulfilled?"2 Pythagoras may have been the first to use the term cosmos to imply that the entire universe has order, which he taught could be understood by mathematics.
    • Greek Philosophers and Aristophanes by Sanderson Beck 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

    .In particular, the very existence of science becomes possible only when it is realized that inner, purely subjective, mathematical forms have a resonance with the form and behavior of the external world — a Pythagorean perception.^ What are some real-world applications of the Pythagorean theorem?

    ^ Pythagoreans recognized only the sensible world and hence did not derive it from immaterial principles.
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 20 September 2009 19:18 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy/Winter 2006) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Wigner, Eugene , "The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics in the Natural Sciences," Communications in Pure and Applied Mathematics , 13(1): 1-14.
    • The Math Book: From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension, 250 Milestones in the History of Mathematics 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC sprott.physics.wisc.edu [Source type: Academic]

    .And a world at peace — that is to say, in a nuclear age, the survival of our planet — is predicated upon ideas of universal brotherhood to which Pythagoras, while not the sole author, made an enormous contribution.^ Many interpreters have found this saying of Pythagoras obscure, since obviously bread is made to be broken when eaten.
    • The Precepts of Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.donaldtyson.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ One could almost say that God, or the Nature of the Universe, thinks in numbers, which notion probably would not have surprised Pythagoras at all.

    ^ Pythagoras is cautioning us not to let considerations of our own convenience destroy the blessings that would otherwise descend upon our children after we have passed on.
    • The Precepts of Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.donaldtyson.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Even the seeming remoteness of Pythagorean teaching helps one to realize that the current world view, while it seems destined to dominate the planet, is fleeting and temporary and, like others before it, will pass.
  • Pythagoras' teachings have enormous relevance in understanding both the sources of our culture and, perhaps more importantly, where it may be heading or may need to head.^ The magical powers ascribed to Orpheus, Pythagoras, and other pre-Sokratic sages (even Sokrates) were recognisably shamanic and this included the art of healing through music.
    • Was Pythagoras Ever Really in Sparta? | Issue #06 | Rosetta 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.rosetta.bham.ac.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ It seems that the method used is more or less equivalent to recognising that the planets move in ellipses and the method allows quite accurate predictions.
    • Harmonics, Music, Pythagoras and the Universe 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC ray.tomes.biz [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ The truth may not have been in general form but rather focused on the simplest such triangle (with sides 3, 4 and 5), pointing out that such a triangle and all others like it will have a right angle.
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 20 September 2009 19:18 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
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    .But to appreciate this we have to understand him in modern terms.
  • At the dawn of our century, scientists were proclaiming that our understanding of the world was almost complete.^ The first term is entirely understandable, since akouo is often used for "hearing a lecturer", almost to the degree of "taking a course".

    .Only one or two small problems in physics remained to be solved.
    One of these problems had to do with black body radiation and was solved by Max Planck.^ Large problems remain even in the case of these sources.
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 20 September 2009 19:18 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
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    ^ I have labelled the white notes and the two black notes which are the same ones found in my cycles research.
    • Harmonics, Music, Pythagoras and the Universe 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC ray.tomes.biz [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ (Note that in 1940, Max Dehn fled Nazi persecution and managed to find a teaching position at Black Mountain College in the U.S. where he was the only mathematician ever to teach at the small college.
    • The Math Book: From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension, 250 Milestones in the History of Mathematics 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC sprott.physics.wisc.edu [Source type: Academic]

    .His solution, however, formed the foundation for quantum mechanics which was to sweep aside almost the whole edifice of fundamental assumptions in physics, and with it our understanding of the world.^ By Aristotle's time "the whole" is as common a concept as the cardinal numbers, although our "zero" might stand in the same position to his zero-less world, as the "whole" was before that time..


    .A hundred years later we are faced with a similar situation. The mechanistic viewpoint that began to dominate our world view in the seventeenth century has almost completed its hegemony.^ The use of the koan in Greece is similar as a teaching and thinking device, but the aim is as different as the fifteen hundred years which separate the Greek and medieval Japanese cultures.

    ^ The testimony of Aristotle makes completely clear, however, that this was the philosophical system of Plato in his later years and not that of Pythagoras or even the later Pythagoreans.
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 20 September 2009 19:18 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
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    .This paradigm, as historian Hugh Kearney points out, stems from only one of three main systems of thought that flowed from Greek thought into the modern world, each of which has dominated our world view at different points in our history.^ These three koans refer to the concept of the "whole", which reaches through a great deal of Greek philosophy down the ages, and deals with the division of the whole into discrete parts.

    ^ Whether "home" is a place on the map, or a point in our past, the inveterate act of repeatedly looking back destroys not only awareness of the present but also consideration of the future.

    ^ Frankly, the cardiovascular system can only tolerate so much jerking from one direction to another at high power before it collapses.
    • Harmonics, Music, Pythagoras and the Universe 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC ray.tomes.biz [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ... .In spite of the dominance of mechanistic thought in the contemporary world, a perplexing residue of the magical tradition still survives in the form of several issues, solutions to which do not appear possible within the context of a purely mechanical view of the world.
  • It is important to recognize that the materialist, scientific paradigm that dominates the late twentieth century world and provides the basis for its dominant institutions, has its basis in the life and work of Pythagoras, one of the most significant representatives of the perennial philosophy and a founder of the magical tradition.^ For both Plato and Aristotle, then, Pythagoras is not a part of the cosmological and metaphysical tradition of Presocratic philosophy nor is he closely connected to the metaphysical system presented by fifth-century Pythagoreans like Philolaus; he is instead the founder of a way of life.
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 20 September 2009 19:18 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
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    ^ Pythagoras wrote nothing, nor were there any detailed accounts of his thought written by contemporaries.
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 20 September 2009 19:18 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
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    ^ The discrepancies between the various fourth-century accounts of the Pythagorean way of life suggest that there were disputes among fourth-century Pythagoreans as to the proper way of life and as to the teachings of Pythagoras himself.
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 20 September 2009 19:18 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy/Winter 2006) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    This spirit, which gave rise to our world view, is a spirit that must be recaptured if our civilization is to flourish. .The choice is a clear one to many, and was summed up in a book title by the late Pythagorean and futurist Buckminster Fuller, Utopia or Oblivion.
  • The concept of a harmonious universe ordered according to "the Great Chain of Being" — a chain that connects the continuum of matter, body, mind, soul and spirit — stands as one of the most fundamental ideas of western thought. ...^ Buckminster Fuller maintained that everything and everyone are to be counted in the totality of the complete Universe, whether visibly contributing or "just being there".

    ^ W. Dunham [ Mathematical Universe ] cites a book The Pythagorean Proposition by an early 20th century professor Elisha Scott Loomis.
    • Pythagorean Theorem and its many proofs from Interactive Mathematics Miscellany and Puzzles 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.cut-the-knot.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Since Pythagoras wrote no books, this most fundamental of all sources is denied us.
    • Pythagoras (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]

    It continues to be a profound influence upon the deepest strata of our thought. And yet a major rift has appeared in the consciousness of our time because the theme of harmonia has not been translated into the realm of human conduct. .The challenge of our time may be to revive it, and make divine harmony "the great theme" of the next millennium.^ The meaning is that we should conserve our resources, and not squander them all in a brief span of time to make a bright display of wealth.
    • The Precepts of Pythagoras 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.donaldtyson.com [Source type: Original source]

    Any success we have in accomplishing this will be based, in large part, on the achievements of Pythagoras.

External links

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has an article about:

1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

.There is more than one meaning of Pythagoras discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.^ One year, when Pythagoras traveled to Olympia for the athletic games, he met with a group of friends and fell into a discussion of prophecies, omens, and divine signs.
  • Selections From Divine Harmony 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.sacredscience.com [Source type: Original source]

^ He observed that the anvil sizes were in simple ratios (1/2, 2/3 etc) and theorised from there about why some tone combinations are more pleasing than others.

^ The modern world would think more highly of Pythagoras if there were not always a suspicion of imposture attached to his conduct.

.We are planning to let all links go to the correct meaning directly, but for now you will have to search it out from the list below by yourself.^ All right, let’s go!
  • Pythagoras & Tobor, a Fantasy fanfic - FictionPress.com 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC www.fictionpress.com [Source type: Original source]

^ You have to find out a way to stop the invasion by traveling into their world and correcting the "mistake."
  • Mistake Of Pythagoras - Valve Developer Community 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC developer.valvesoftware.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The study questions below will help you assess your knowledge; print them out and complete them as you read.
  • Pythagoras_Plato 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC homepage.mac.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.If you want to change the link that led you here yourself, it would be appreciated.^ What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link This page was last modified on 4 June 2009, at 00:27.
  • Mistake Of Pythagoras - Valve Developer Community 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC developer.valvesoftware.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ What links here Related changes Upload file Special pages Printable version Permanent link This page was last modified 17:06, 8 June 2009.
  • Pythagoras - Bibliography - Citizendium 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC en.citizendium.org [Source type: Academic]

^ What links here Related changes Upload file Special pages Printable version Permanent link This page was last modified 14:21, 6 November 2008.
  • Pythagoras - encyclopedia article - Citizendium 14 January 2010 17:19 UTC locke.citizendium.org:8080 [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]


Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

Contents

English

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Etymology

From Ancient Greek Πυθαγόρας (Puthagoras).

Pronunciation

  • (RP) IPA: /paɪˈθæg.ər.əs/
  • (US) IPA: /pɪˈθæ.gɚ.əs/

Proper noun

Singular
Pythagoras
Plural
-
Pythagoras
  1. An Ancient Greek mathematician and philosopher

Derived terms

Translations


Czech

Proper noun

Pythagoras m.
  1. Pythagoras

Simple English

Pythagoras of Samos was a famous Greek mathematician and philosopher, born between 580 and 572 BC, and died between 500 and 490 BC. He is known best for the Pythagorean theorem, which is an important theorem about right triangles. He started a group of mathematicians, called the Pythagoreans, who worshiped numbers and lived like monks. He was an influence for Plato.

He had a great impact on mathematics, theory of music and astronomy. His theories are still used in mathematics today. He was one of the greatest thinkers of his time.

Pythagoras was born in Samos, a little island off the western coast of Asia Minor. There is not much information about his life. He was said to have had a good childhood. Growing up with two or three brothers, he was well educated. He didn’t agree with the government and their schooling, so he set up his own cult (little society) of followers under his rule. His followers did not have any personal possessions, and they were all vegetarians. Pythagoras taught them all, and they had to obey strict rules.

[[File:|thumb|right|200px|Graphical demonstration of the Pythagorean theorem]] Some say he was the first person to use the term philosophy. Since he worked very closely with his group, the Pythagoreans, it is sometimes hard to tell his works from those of his followers.

Religion was important to the Pythagoreans. They swore their oaths by "1+2+3+4" (which equals 10). They also believed that the soul is immortal and goes through a cycle of rebirths until it can become pure. They believed that these souls were in both animal and plant life. Pythagoras himself claimed to remember having lived four different lives. He also told of hearing the voice of a dead friend in the howl of a dog being beaten, and was then attacked by an angry mob.

Pythagoras' most important belief was that the physical world was mathematical and that numbers were the real reality.

mrj:Пифагор (философ)


Citable sentences

Up to date as of December 18, 2010

Here are sentences from other pages on Pythagoras, which are similar to those in the above article.








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