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Quanah, Acme and Pacific Railway was a 117-mile freight railroad that operated between Red River, Texas and Floydada, Texas from 1902 until it was merged into the Burlington Northern Railroad in 1981.

History

On May 3, 1902, the railroad line was incorporated as the Acme, Red River and Northern Railway. The founders' original, never-realized plans were to extend the line 500 miles from Red River all the way to El Paso, Texas.[1]

On January 28, 1909, the railroad assumed the name of the Quanah, Acme and Pacific.[1]

In 1911, the St. Louis-San Francisco Railway assumed control of the QA&P.[1]

Freight stops on the QA&P were in Red River, Carnes, Quanah, Acme, Lazare, Swearingen, Paducah, Narcisso, Summit (Motley County), Russellville, Roaring Springs, MacBain, Dougherty, Boothe Spur and Floydada.

On June 8, 1981, the QA&P was merged by owner Burlington Northern Railroad, which had merged the QA&P's corporate parent, the St. Louis-San Francisco Railway, on November 21, 1980.[2]

The Burlington Northern Railroad abandoned the former QA&P line west of Paducah in 1982.[3]

Traffic

During its life, the QA&P's traffic consisted of overhead freight—between the St. Louis-San Francisco Railway at Red River and the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway at Floydada—and some general commodities.[1] The railroad's traffic was cut back when overhead trade took a shorter route.[4]

References

  1. ^ a b c d Lewis, Edward A.. American Short Line Railway Guide. The Baggage Car. p. 94.  
  2. ^ Lewis, Edward A.. American Short Line Railway Guide. Kalmbach Books. p. 233.  
  3. ^ Lewis, Edward A.. American Short Line Railway Guide. Kalmbach Books. p. 233.  
  4. ^ Trains magazine, January 1984, p. 44.
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