Queen of the South F.C.: Wikis

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Queen of the south
Biglogo.png
Full name Queen of the South Football Club
Nickname(s) The Doonhamers, Queens
Founded March 1919
Ground Palmerston Park, Dumfries, Scotland
(Capacity: 6,412 (3,509 seated))
Chairman Scottish Davie Rae
Manager Scottish Gordon Chisholm
League Scottish First Division
2008–09 Scottish First Division, 5th
Home colours
Away colours

Queen of the South Football Club is a Scottish professional football club founded in 1919 and located in Dumfries. The club currently plays in the Scottish First Division, the second tier of Scottish football.

Officially nicknamed The Doonhamers, but usually referred to as Queens and sometimes as QOS (as also listed on the club badge), its home ground since its formation has been Palmerston Park.

The club has won national honours, namely the 1950–51 B Division, the 2001–02 Second Division and the 2002–03 Scottish Challenge Cup. While Queens led Scotland's top division until Christmas in season 1953–54, its highest-ever finish in the Scottish top flight was fourth in 1933–34. Its longest cup run was in the 2007–08 Scottish Cup, in which it reached the final and finished runners-up.

The club is currently managed by Gordon Chisholm.

Contents

History

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Formation and early success

Club name and formation

Dumfries got its nickname Queen of the South from David Dunbar, a local poet, who in 1857 stood for Parliament in the General Election. In one of his addresses, he called Dumfries "Queen of the South" and this became synonymous with the town.[1]

Early in 1919, a handful of Dumfries football enthusiasts met in their homes to discuss not only the restoration of competitive football fixtures locally (following the end of World War I) but also the formation through amalgamation of a local football club to compete at more than a local level.[1]

A public meeting was arranged in Dumfries Town Hall on 21 March 1919 on the proposed merger and representatives were approached by three clubs from Dumfries and Maxwelltown:

  • Dumfries F.C.
  • The 5th Kirkcudbrightshire Rifle Volunteers / 5th Kings Own Scottish Borders Football Team
  • (Car manufacturer works side) Arrol-Johnston

At the meeting, the dignitary of Dumfries F.C. declined the invite to join the merged club. The other two clubs agreed to the merger.[1]

Queen of the South United was agreed upon as the name of the new club, and Palmerston Park (already an established football venue) was chosen as the club's home.[1]

After four trial matches, Queen of the South's (the United extension had been dropped along the way) first-ever game took place on 16 August 1919. Invites were sent to local councillors and magistrates, and the presence of Dumfries Town Band added to the sense of occasion. The opposition was Sanquhar side Nithsdale Wanderers, and the challenge game ended 2–2. Among those who played in this first game was Ian Dickson, who would leave in 1921 to play for Aston Villa.[2]

The club badge contains the same motto as that on the crest for the town of Dumfries: A Lore Burne.

Queen of the South are separate from a much earlier team named Queen of the South Wanderers that had become defunct in 1894.[1]

Early days

Queens early seasons were involved in regional set-ups.

Queens first-ever competitive fixture was on 6 September 1919, in the Scottish Qualifying Cup against Thornhill. After a 1–1 draw, Queens went through after a replay (again played at Palmerston). Queens' first-ever away game coincided with their first defeat. Both came two rounds later in the same competition — a replay away to Galston.[1]

Very early in their careers, the form of Dave Halliday (1920) and Hughie Gallacher (1921) at Queen of the South proved to be the beginnings of successful careers elsewhere.[2]

Jimmy McKinnell, from Dalbeattie, and Willie McCall and Tom Wylie were sold to Blackburn Rovers around the same time. This, combined with the sale to Aston Villa of Ian Dickson, helped to fund the purchase of Palmerston Park in 1921 for £1,500.[1]

At a regional level, Queens won many cups in the Southern Counties set-up. Playing in the Western League, Queens were runners up in 1921–22. Queens then created something of a sensation with the signing coup of Joe Dodds from Celtic. With further experience provided on the pitch by ex-Liverpool player Bob McDougall, Queens won the Western League in 1922–23 with a 20 game unbeaten league campaign.[1]

Entering the Scottish Football League

Queen of the South had applied unsuccessfully to join the Scottish League for seasons 1921–22 and 1922–23. The ambition bore fruit in 1923–24, however, when they were invited to join the Scottish Football league at its lowest level, the newly created Third Division. Queens finished third. Their most notable achievement that season was in the Scottish Qualifying Cup. Then considerably more prestigious than now, Queens brought the cup to the South West for the first time in its 25-year history. In the final replay, a run through the opposition half and shot from Bob McDermid (on loan at Queens from Rangers before going on to captain Aberdeen) opened the scoring. Next, McDermid's "dummy" let Bert Lister in to hit the second. McDermid's left-foot finish sealed the 3–0 win, and Queens were crowned. The train bringing the players and the trophy back to Dumfries were met by crowds of jubilant well-wishers on the platforms and surrounding streets and approaches. The team were then entertained at the Town Hall buildings on Buccleuch Street.[1]

Goalkeeper Jimmy Coupland signed in 1924 and made his debut aged 16. Queens' first tangible national league success came in its second season of 1924–25 by finishing second to gain promotion to the Second Division.[1]

1926–27 saw Queens drawn competitively for the first time against Old Firm opposition. Queens took eventual winners Celtic to a replay before being eliminated from the Scottish Cup. Among those playing for Queens was inside left Billy Halliday, brother of Dave Halliday. The 21-year-old's nine goals in fifteen games that season saw Newcastle United offer him a contract. With the offer of higher wages and a signing-on fee, plus his brother's success as a goalscorer at nearby Sunderland, he signed. At Newcastle he joined Hughie Gallacher, who had captained the Geordies to the 1926–27 English league championship.[1]

1931–32 was notable for a number of reasons. Centre-forward Jimmy Rutherford hit what remains the record number of goals in one season for Queens: 41. The Scottish Cup campaign saw Queens inflict its record senior victory of 11–1. The opposition was south-west rivals Stranraer, whose goal was the last of the twelve scored. In the next round, Queens took top-division Dundee United to two replays before elimination.[1]

In 1932 Coupland was injured and was replaced by John Smith. Willie Savage joined the same year (he make would make 369 appearances for Queens)[2]. Willie Culbert also joined in 1932, and with Savage he would form the club's full-back partnership for years to come. Left winger Tommy McCall broke the national record of goals scored in a season from his position, with 32. Queens ended its 1932–33 league campaign with a 2–1 victory over divisional champions Hibernian. After previous seasons solidly consolidating its position in the Second Division, Queen of the South were promoted to the First Division as runners up. Ten years after entering the league, and with two promotions behind them, the club was set for top-flight football.[1]

1933 to 1966 and top division football

Top division football

From 1933, excluding war-time interruption, Queen of the South spent only one season out of Scotland's top division until 1959. In this period Queens' ability to live with the elite was demonstrated by its results against Celtic. On eighteen visits to Palmerston Park, Celtic managed just five victories. With three games drawn, Queens claimed full points on ten occasions.[1]

First season in the top division and finishing 4th

Willie Ferguson joined Queen of the South at the start of 1933–34 season (after four years as a Queens player, Ferguson would become manager).[2] In its first-ever game in the top division, a Queens team featuring Smith in goal, and Savage, Culbert and Ferguson playing outfield, Queens condemned Celtic to a 3–2 defeat. The Sunday Mail headline read, "Queens brew hot stew, Celtic merely the gravy".[1] The Celtic match programme the week after said, "We would be failing in our duty as Celts and as sportsmen if we omitted to congratulate Queen of the South on their victory over us. And we hope they will continue to serve up good, honest football which brought them their first victory in the league."[1]

That season of 1933–34 saw the club's highest-ever league finish, with fourth place in Scotland's top flight. Irish international Laurie Cumming scored 24 goals that season. Adam "Skull" Allan and winger and local player Willie Anderson would also figure prominently. Among the scalps Queens took that season were double victories over Celtic, Hibs and Hearts. Queens reached the Scottish Cup quarter finals before losing to two deflected goals away to St. Johnstone.[1]

The 1936 overseas tour and the Algiers invitational tournament

In 1935, George McLachlan became Queen of the South manager (as well as playing in Scotland and in the 1927 FA Cup win with Cardiff City his experience included over 100 games for Manchester United and a spell with French side Le Havre).[2] In May 1936 he took Queens on an eleven-game tour to France, Luxembourg and Algeria. In France it played against such teams as Montpellier HSC (losing 4–2) and Stade Reims (winning 5–4).[1]

The tour included competing in a four team invitational tournament in Algiers. With Algeria then under French colonial rule the official programme[1] listed the venue as "Stade-Velodrome Municipal d'Alger" and the participants as:-

Le Queen of the South - La Belle Equipe Ecossaise de Première Division

Racing-Club de Santander - Favori des Championnats d'Espagne

Floriana F. C. de Malte - Champion Officiel et Vainqueur de la Coupe

R.U.A. - Champion de l'Afrique du Nord 1935

The match days were 21 May and 24 May.

Home side Racing Universitaire d'Alger (R.U.A. for whom Nobel Prize winning author/philosopher Albert Camus had played in goals for its junior team) had already won both the North African Champions Cup and the North African Cup in the 30s (R.U.A. would win each twice by the decade's end). Goals by Willie Thomson and Joe Tulip (the Northumbrian was one of the first Englishmen to play in the Scottish League) saw Queens book a place in the invitational tournament final with a 2–1 victory against them.[1]

In the final Queens faced a Racing de Santander side who had just finished 4th in Spain's La Liga notching home and away double victories against both Real Madrid and F.C. Barcelona. Norrie Haywood's goal and a 1–0 scoreline saw victory for La Belle Equipe Ecossaise. The trophy can still be seen in Queens' club museum today.[1]

The full list of results from the 1936 tour are contained in the Results against overseas teams section.

The late 1930s

On the back of league wins against Dundee and Hibs, on 30 January 1937 captained by Savage, with Willie Fotheringham in goal and with Culbert, Allan, Cumming, Tulip and Jackie Law also playing, Queen of the South condemned Rangers to a 1–0 first round Scottish Cup exit.[1] The Evening Times reported, "It was more than a merited win for Queen of the South. It was a triumph".[1]

Winger Jackie Oakes signed in 1936 from Wolverhampton Wanderers (he would eventually leave for Blackburn Rovers in 1947).[2] 1937/38 at Ibrox Park was the first season when Queens condemned Rangers to a league defeat.[1] In 1938 Pat Fitzsimmons signed from Preston North End and original board member Jimmy McKinnell Senior became secretary/manager until retiring in 1946. Tommy Lang signed after his successful career down South including spells with Newcastle United (1932 F.A. Cup winner), Huddersfield Town and Manchester United.[1] Queens hit the Scottish Football League top spot for the first time in 1938/39 and finished the season in sixth place.[1]

In 1939/40 after 5 games with Queens in ninth place, the league was abandoned, after war was declared in Europe. Scottish football was then restructured into a regionalised two league set up with an East and a West league. Queens played in the West League. The new League started on 21 October 1939.[1]

The 1940s

At the end of 1939/40 Queen of the South finished as runners up to Rangers in the West league. Queens never played another league game until the war in Europe was over.[1] The national league resumed in 1946/47 with Queens retaining its place in the top division.[1]

Freddie Jenkins joined in 1947 and in 1949 was transferred to Chelsea for a record fee of £10,000. 1947/48 was the first season Queens would register league victories against both of the Old Firm in the same season.[1]

Wales, Leeds United and Juventus legend John Charles made his first team debut for Leeds United in a friendly versus Queens on 19 April 1949. The score was 0–0, crowd 20,000. The same year on 15 October saw the collective debut of Hibs' 'famous five' forward line of Gordon Smith, Bobby Johnstone, Lawrie Reilly, Eddie Turnbull and Willie Ormond. Queens lost 2–0.[1]

1949/50 and other Scottish Cup runs

Queen of the South have made it to the Scottish Cup quarter-finals on numerous occasions. Only once in the 20th century did it progress beyond that stage. That was in 1950 when it knocked out Aberdeen 2–1 away in a replay (the home game was 3–3). In the semi-final after drawing 1–1, Queens were knocked out 3–0 by Rangers in a replay. Both semi-finals were played at Hampden Park in Glasgow.[1]

In 18 Scottish cups played between 1938/39 and 1962/63 Queens reached the quarter finals six times. The most memorable of the 5 of these that resulted in defeat was in 1962/63. Dundee United required two replays to see Queens off after the first two games ended 1–1.[1]

The 1950s and Queens' best

The Scottish cup run to the semi-final was balanced by the disappointment of Queen of the South's first ever league relegation. 1950/51 saw Queens rule the Scottish B Division when promoted straight back to the top flight as champions[1] clinching the title by winning away at Forfar. Queens also reached the semi-final of the Scottish League Cup. The championship trophy was presented to then captain and rugged centre half Willie Aird at the start of the next season. In that same 1951/52 season the Doonhamers would hand Celtic a 4–0 thrashing.[1]

The early and mid-1950s saw the club's most successful spell to date achieving regular mid table finishes in the Scottish A Division (as the top flight was then called). Queen's were managed throughout this period by Jimmy McKinnell Junior. On 23 February 1952 Palmerston Park saw its record attendance of 26,552 for the Scottish Cup visit of Hearts.[1]

This was the era at the club of goalkeeper Roy Henderson[2], full back Dougie Sharpe[2], and until July 1952 Dumfries boy and centre-forward Billy Houliston[2]. Centre forward Jackie Brown debuted in January 1947 (in season 1953/54 he would score 4 hat tricks). Dougie McBain replaced Fitzsimmons and gave 7 years from 1948. Jim Patterson[2] signed in 1949 (251 strikes for the club make Jim Patterson the all time goals king of Queens). Inside forward and play maker Walter Rothera joined the club in 1951 as did full back Jimmy Binning[2], classy left half Jimmy Greenock and Jackie Oakes[2] returned this time from Manchester City. Centre-half Alex Smith and goal scoring outside right Bobby Black[2] (another local boy) did the same in 1952. Black is the club's 2nd highest scorer with 120 goals. Charlie Johnstone played until 1953 before retiring aged 41. At different levels whilst at Queens, Houliston, Sharp, Patterson, Binning and Black would represent Scotland internationally. Henderson was selected 6 times as Scotland reserve goalkeeper.[2] Queens topped Scotland's highest division until Christmas in season 1953/54. Same season league defeats were given again to both of the Old Firm in 1953/54 and 1955/56 by killer Queens. The solidity of Queen's results through this period peaked in 1955/56 when after again leading the top division early in the season it finished in sixth place - a finish surpassed only once in the club's history.[1] For Queens fans this was the time of the beautiful South.

Queens were subsequently relegated from the top division in 1959.

Early and mid 1960s

In February 1960 ex-Scotland and long-time Blackpool FA Cup winning goalkeeper George Farm signed for Queen of the South. Another ex-international, England's Ivor Broadis had already joined at the start of that season.[2][1]

Queens made it to the League Cup semi-final in 1960–61 for the second and to date last time. Farm was made player manager in 1961. Fast and tricky right winger, Ernie Hannigan (he later said, "Going to Queen of the South turned out to be a great move"),[1] and big, future Scotland centre forward, Neil Martin (44 goals in 78 Queens games), joined in '61 and formed a partnership (they would later play together in England's top division with Coventry City).[2] With Jim Patterson still at Queens the club were promoted back to the top division in 1962 where it played again for two seasons (beating Celtic at Parkhead in 1962/63).[1] Queens have not played top division football since 1963/64.[1]

Two players signed for Queens in the early 1960s who gave greater service than any other player. With a combined service of 4 decades and over 1400 games between them, these players are Allan Ball and Ian McChesney[2]. Billy Collings, Jim Kerr and the Law brothers (Lex and Jackie junior) were also 60s mainstays. Queens keenly contested promotion to the top flight in 1964/65 and 1965/66 but missed out by one place by finishing 3rd on both occasions.[1]

The Harkness era

Willie Harkness became Queen of the South chairman in 1967.[1]

A second place finish in 1974/75 failed to carry the significance of previous seasons due to league restructure meaning the top 6 clubs would play in the 2nd of 3 divisions the next season (instead of providing promotion to the top tier as had been the case before). 70s long servants Jocky Dempster and Crawford Boyd were by now well established at Queens.[2][1]

Two seasons later in 1976/77 by finishing 9th in a 12 team second flight makes this one of only two season in the Harkness era when Queens finished in the upper half of the Scottish league (placing them 19th out of 38 clubs as there were then).[1]

Queens were promoted as runners up of the third of three divisions in 1980/81 (winger Jimmy Robertson was divisional player of the year) and in 1985–86[2]. However both visits to the middle division were short (one season and three seasons respectively). 1987–88 seen Queens second and last Harkness era finish in the top half of the Scottish League ladder when finishing 7th out of 12 in the middle division (placing them 19th out of 38 clubs). Along with Robertson the other outstanding long servants of the 80s were George Cloy[2] and Alan Davidson. Nobby Clark played in the '81 promotion season and was manager for the promotion in '86.[2][1]

In 1970/71 and 1972/73 11th place finishes in the lower division meant Queens finished 9th bottom of 37 teams in the Scottish league ladder. In finishing second bottom in the lowest division in 1979/80 only Alloa Athletic that season prevented Queens finishing bottom of the entire Scottish football league ladder. From 1982/83 to 1984–85 Queens finished in 8th bottom, 9th bottom and 7th bottom. More abject league finishes followed; the sequence from 1989–90 to 1992–93 was 5th bottom, 3rd bottom, 4th bottom and 5th bottom of the Scottish football league pile. The 7 times when Queens have finished in Scotland's bottom 8 were all in the Harkness era. Of the 4 finishes of 9th bottom place, 3 of these were in the Harkness era with the other being in the 1920s within 5 years of Queens joining the Scottish league.[1]

Cup highlights in the Harkness era were also scarce. Queens had two runs to the Scottish Cup quarter-finals. These were in 1975–76 (including an Allan Ball penalty save with a broken ankle in the away 2–2 fourth round draw with Ayr United before the 5–4 replay victory), and 1976–77. In the 1990–91 Scottish Cup Queens were knocked out at home to then non league Ross County in a 2nd round replay conceding 6 goals to 2. Two seasons later (again in the second round) Queens went out to non league opposition again this time losing 2–1 away to Huntly. In 1993–94 Queens conceded 8 goals to Forfar in the 1st round exit (scoring 3 in reply).[1]

The lowest recorded attendance for a competitive Queens' game at Palmerston is 300 on 4 May 1974. Alloa Athletic were the league opponents in an end of season Queens 1–0 victory.[1]

The finest footballer from Dumfries[3] of his generation, Davie Irons, was an unrecognised talent at Queens. Queens were Irons' side for one year where he played 3 first team games. He moved in 1980 into junior football with Kello Rovers. Irons returned to the senior game and included playing premier league football in Scotland in a respected playing career spanning 26 years. Irons scored the opening goal for Dunfermline in the game that confirmed Queens' relegation in 1989.[1]

Ian McCall in his boyhood was a regular on the Palmerston terraces. His hopes of playing for the club were dashed, though, by then chairman Willie Harkness. "I played a trial game for the club, and thought I did reasonably well," McCall recalls. "Drew Busby was the manager, but I was told by Willie Harkness I might not make the grade. Instead (in 1983) I went to Queen's Park, and then three years after that was sold to Rangers for £250,000."[4]

More talent slipped unnoticed through the club in the shape of Bernie Slaven. The young Slaven played 2 first team games as a trialist for Queens in 1983/84.[5] Slaven's next club was Albion Rovers with whom he would score 31 goals in season 1984–85. From Rovers Slaven went to Middlesbrough in October 1985 where he notched 146 goals in 381 games over eight seasons. He was part of the Republic of Ireland squad for the 1990 World Cup.

In 1984 Queens smashed its previous highest transfer fee received with £100,000 for Ted McMinn.[2][1]

In December 1993 Tommy Bryce of Queens scored a "hat-trick" against Arbroath in a period of 1 minute, 46 seconds, earning him a place in the Guinness Book of Records[2]. In February 1994 Bryce hit high speed another "hat-trick" this time against Dumbarton in a time of 3 and a 1/2 minutes. In both games Bryce hit four goals.[1]

The control of Queen of the South Football Club by Willie Harkness ended on 14 April 1994.[1]

Rebuilding and revival - 1994 to today

Starting the re-build

Norman Blount

New chairman Norman Blount started the ball rolling on dragging Queen of the South into the 21st century by the bootstraps. Two time divisional player of the year Andy Thomson was transferred for a club record fee of £250,000 in 1994. As Thomson was to say on his return over a decade later, "Things have changed quite a bit while I've been away - a new stand, a completely new set-up and a more modern type of training system". Thomson added, "Norman Blount was an excellent chairman."[2][1]

Arriving quickly in the new era was the new stand. Rangers provided the opposition in April 1995 in a game (drawn 2–2) to commemorate the stand opening and also the club's 75th anniversary. Notably among those happy to guest for Queens' new regime were Davie Irons and Ian McCall.[1]

Other ideas quickly came along that showed that the club was in a new era:-

  • The club became the first senior club in the UK to establish a club museum[1]
  • Queen of the South became the first club in the world to deploy astro turf on the outside of the touch line on a grass pitch (for linesmen to run along). Initially the Scottish Football Association agreed this as a 12 month experiment. However such was the success of the astro turf that the SFA brought the experiment to an early close and sanctioned use of this idea for any other club interested[1]
  • The first senior club in the UK to use a lottery scheme to decide the annual shirt sponsor. Such was the success of the idea that the club became inundated with calls from other clubs enquiring on the best way to set such a scheme up[1]

Queens have gone on to rebuild some relative success last enjoyed in the pre-Harkness era.[1] In 1997 the club reached the Scottish Challenge Cup final for the first time. Second Division Queens lost 1–0 to 1st Division Falkirk despite a rousing Queens display at Motherwell's Fir Park; a performance that included the man of the match award going to Queens veteran central midfield playmaker Tommy Bryce and an early career appearance for Jamie McAllister[6]. The final witnessed one of the earlier appearances of Jim Thomson and Andy Aitken lining up together in defence. Both have since made over 300 first team appearances for Queens.[1]

Scenes from the film A Shot at Glory, starring Robert Duvall, Michael Keaton and Brian Cox were shot at Palmerston Park during 1999.[1]

Ronnie Bradford moved up as new Chairman in November 1999.[1]

Back to the top half

February 2007 against Hibernian F.C.
Jim Thomson
Gordon Chisholm
John O'Neill
Stephen Dobbie

The recent Queen of the South improved record was blotted in 1999/2000. At the end of a poor season only a controversial points deduction for Hamilton Academical saved Queen of the South from relegation to the Third Division.[1]

John Connolly was appointed manager in July 2000. With captain Jim Thomson Queens ruled the Second Division to take the title in 2001/02. On 20 April 2002, like 51 years before, this was clinched with Queens winning away at Forfar Athletic. This time it was 3–0 with goals by forwards Peter Weatherson (2) and Sean O'Connor leading to jubilant fans pouring on to the pitch after full time. Goal scoring midfielder John O'Neill was awarded divisional player of the year. The following season saw Queens victorious in the Scottish Challenge Cup with Robbie Neilson playing. Brechin City were condemned to a 2–0 defeat in the final at Clyde's Broadwood Stadium. In the Scottish Cup third round Queens held Aberdeen to a 0–0 draw at Palmerston before losing the replay. Bradford left due to ill health in June 2003. Davie Rae took over as chairman.[1]

John Connolly left the club in May 2004 to join former club St. Johnstone, with his former assistant Iain Scott taking over. With a second consecutive fifth place spot in 2004, Queens became the first part-time club to remain in the new First Division for more than two years. Queens then finished fourth in the First Division in 2005 - their highest finish since 1963.[1]

Iain Scott parted from the club with the club second bottom of the league in 2005–06. Dumfries-born Ian McCall, by this time also a BBC media pundit[4], was appointed manager in November 2005. McCall brought in Gordon Chisholm as his assistant. Seven new players were acquired in the January transfer 'window'. Queens went on a run, losing only once at home since November and collecting 23 points from their last 12 games. It secured its First Division survival with a 1–1 draw at Brechin City on 22 April 2006.

A poor start to the 2006–07 campaign saw the Dumfries side bottom of the league after 21 games. Inspired by the goals of January transfer window signing Stephen Dobbie, a twelve match unbeaten run led to the side avoiding relegation in the penultimate game of the season. A Scottish Cup run that included a replay penalty shoot out victory over Dundee saw Queens make the quarter-finals before Hibernian won 2 –1 at Palmerston. McCall's time at Queens was soured when Queens were fined £20,000 after McCall fielded an inelegible player in the cup run. Chairman Davie Rae described the fine as, "A substantial sum".[7] Queen of the South and Ian McCall parted company at the season's end.[8]

Davie Rae led the club to full time football at the start of the 2007–08 season. Gordon Chisholm was announced as the new manager on 28 June 2007 and appointed Kenny Brannigan as assistant. After an injury filled start to the season Queens picked up with a 10 game unbeaten run in all competitions that started in January. This run propelled them to 4th in Scottish First Division where Queens finished the season..[1]

2007–08 Scottish Cup run to the final

Quarter final match ticket
Semi final result on the scoreboard at Hampden Park
Semi final result in a Dumfries baker's window
QoS fans enjoy the day out to the 2008 Scottish Cup final
The Odeon at Dumfries captures the good will in the town regarding Queen of the South's run to the Scottish Cup final
Open top bus for the QoS cup final squad

On 8 March 2008 Chisholm guided Queen of the South to their first Scottish Cup semi-final in 58 years with a 2–0 quarter-final home victory over Dundee at Palmerston. The goals came from prolific marksman Stephen Dobbie and an 84-yard (77 m) injury time long distance shot from Ryan McCann, with an application pending for the Guinness Book of Records as the longest distance goal ever scored by an outfield player (the previous record reportedly stood at 82 yards).[1]

The semi-final at Hampden Park, Glasgow on 12 April, was against Premier League side Aberdeen who finished fourth in the league. Although Queens were underdogs, over 10,000 Queens fans were in the crowd of 24,008 to witness an astonishing game. Four times Queens took the lead with goals through Steve Tosh, Paul Burns, Sean O'Connor and John Stewart. 3 times Aberdeen hit back with an equaliser including a goal from Dumfries boy Barry Nicholson.[9] During an 11 minute spell at the beginning of the second half 5 goals were scored, with Queens' fourth goal of the day giving a 4–3 victory for the Doonhamers.[10] Aberdeen fans generously applauded Queens' victory. The highest scoring game in a Scottish Cup semi-final took rocket Queens to the final for the first time in their 89 year history.[10]

After four weeks without a competitive game following the end of the Scottish League Division 1 season[11] the final was against Rangers on 24 May again at Hampden Park. Despite a battling second half performance to pull back the 2 goal half time deficit to 2–2 Queens eventually lost 3–2. Queens' scorers were Stevie Tosh and long-serving captain Jim Thomson.[12] Afterwards Queens players expressed their disappointment in the result.[13] Tosh voiced his frustrations at refereeing decisions that went against Queens.[1]

For a team with the core of its support being in a town with a population of 38 000 Queens took a support of around 15 500 to the final. Queens fans were widely praised for their good humour and carnival-like contribution to the day.[14] Despite defeat in the final 14 000 fans[15] attended an open top bus parade by the team through Dumfries.[16]

Date Round Teams, score & Queens scorers Attendance
24:11:07 Third Peterhead 0 – 5 Queen of the South (Dobbie 27, 89, O'Connor 44, 57, Burns 90) 695
12:01:08 Fourth Queen of the South (Dobbie 16, Thomson 22, O'Connor 40, McArthur 72 (og)) 4 – 0 Linlithgow Rose 3,062
02:02:08 Fifth Morton 0 – 2 Queen of the South (O'Connor 46, Stewart 87) 3,506
08:03:08 Sixth Queen of the South (Dobbie 51, McCann 90) 2 – 0 Dundee 6,278
12:04:08 Semi-final Queen of the South (Tosh 22, Burns 49, O'Connor 56, Stewart 60) 4 – 3 Aberdeen 24,008
24:05:08 Final Queen of the South (Tosh 50, Thomson 53) 2 – 3 Rangers 48,821

2008–09 and the UEFA Cup

QoS fans the day after the 2008 Scottish Cup Final eagerly await the UEFA Cup adventure
Scoreboard at full time in Denmark

From the Scottish Cup run Queen of the South qualified for the 2nd qualification round of the 2008–09 UEFA Cup.[17] BBC TV cup final coverage described Queens' UEFA Cup qualification as, "The very essence of sport".[1]

Queens were drawn against Danish side FC Nordsjælland with ties scheduled for Thursday 14 August in Scotland and Tuesday 26 August in Denmark. UEFA seating restrictions meant Queens played their home UEFA Cup tie at the Excelsior Stadium - home of Airdrie United. After surviving two pitch inspection because of heavy rain Queens lost 2–1. Sean O'Connor's header scored Queens goal.[18][1]

In the away leg Bob Harris had the Doonhamers in the lead from a free-kick after 2 minutes. With Queen pushing for the critical second goal and throwing caution to the wind late in the game, with 5 minutes remaining two goals by Martin Bernburg of Nordsjælland put the tie beyond Queens.[19]

UEFA Cup exit for Queens in Denmark

Nordsjaelland head coach Morten Wieghorst applauded Queen of the South's efforts in the Scottish side's defeat. "I must give lot of credit to Queens, my players looked under pressure. They couldn't handle it in the first half and we got off to a dreadful start with the early goal for Queens. Overall, I think Queens had more chances than us."[20]

Nordsjaelland skipper Henrik Kildentoft added: "It wasn't an easy game. We knew it would be tough, because our manager Morten Wieghorst has played against First Division teams in Scotland himself and he told us they would go for it all the way. Looking back at the game, I would say we delivered a mixed performance - a very bad first half and a good second half."[20]

On domestic duty Queens returned to the top of the First Division for the first time in five years on 4 October with a 6–1 home victory against Livingston.

Club culture

Scotland international Robbie Neilson of Leicester City says of Queen of the South from his loan period at the club in 2002: "It's a well-run club and a real family club with a good spirit about the place."[21]

Marc Horne wrote in The Scotsman following Queens' appearance in the 2008 Scottish Cup Final: "In the Palmerston Park club's songbook, it is clear there is no room for songs which feature religion, violent vendettas or centuries-old battles that took place in other lands."[22]

In the 2008 UEFA Cup qualifying trip to Denmark Queen of the South fans were hailed as "a great credit both to their club and to Scotland" by Danish police. About 850 supporters of the Dumfries club travelled to Denmark to watch the Uefa Cup clash with FC Nordsjaelland. Despite the fact that their team was eliminated, local police said their behaviour was impressive. Insp Rune Hamann said: "It was a pleasure hosting such a visit by Queen of the South whose supporters were extremely well behaved and a great credit both to their club and to Scotland. Copenhagen was particularly busy in the build up to and after the match with a carnival, party atmosphere being evident. I look forward to welcoming Queen of the South and their terrific supporters back in Denmark in the future."[23]

Ch Insp Mickey Collins from Dumfries and Galloway Constabulary said the fans were a "pleasure to work along with". He added: "Despite the huge numbers of supporters who travelled to Denmark there were no arrests, incidents or issues of any concern. Great praise should be passed on to those fortunate enough to be at the match."[24]

Notable players

Dave Halliday from Dumfries joined then non-league Queen of the South in 1920 scoring 13 goals in 19 games for the Doonhamers. Moving on to St. Mirren, Dundee, Sunderland, Arsenal, Manchester City and Clapton Orient he scored 373 senior goals in 488 games at senior Scottish and English clubs. His 38 goals in 1923–24 made him top scorer in Scotland's top flight that season and 43 goals in 1928–29 gave him the same distinction in England's top division. After being player-manager of Yeovil & Petters United he won trophies as manager of both Aberdeen and Leicester City. As a manager only Halliday and Alex Ferguson have guided Aberdeen to be Scottish champions. After one cap for the Scottish league in 1924 Halliday was never picked to play for the Scottish national side, being consistently overlooked in favour of Hughie Gallacher.[2]

Ian Dickson like Dave Halliday was a local boy who played for Arrol-Johnston and then Queens. From Queens Dickson went to Aston Villa where he scored 39 goals in 83 games including a top scoring 28 goals in season 1921/22 helping Villa finish 5th in the English League. After Villa Dickson played for Middlesbrough. His name on the Queens team sheet was replaced by that of Hughie Gallacher.[2]

Hughie Gallacher started his professional football career at Queens in January 1921. In his 9 games for Queens he scored 19 goals. A pocket sized footballing phenomenon of natural skill and muscular strength, in 624 games Gallacher scored 463 times in a career of terrorising defences. Scotland's third highest goal scorer with 23 goals from only 20 games, Gallacher's remarkable international strike rate of more than a goal a game makes him the most prolific Scottish international goal scorer in history. 5 ft 5 in (1.65 m), Gallacher was part of the Wembley Wizards who beat England 5–1 in 1928. His clubs were Queens, Airdrieonians, Newcastle United, Chelsea, Derby County, Notts County, Grimsby Town and Gateshead. Gallacher also captained Newcastle to their last ever Championship in 1926/27. Gallacher always spoke fondly of his time at Queens.[2].

Willie Ferguson started his senior career at Queens before leaving in 1921 to spend over a decade at Chelsea. The winger made 294 appearances for Chelsea before returning to Queens for four seasons as a player before becoming manager in 1937. Ferguson was part of the team that finished fourth in Scotland's top division in 1934 and that successfully toured overseas in 1936.[2]

George Hamilton's first season in football was at Queen of the South in 1937/38. The inside forward was then signed by Aberdeen manager Dave Halliday (see above) for a long period of service there together that would end in 1955. In this time the Dons won the league and cup with the inspirational Hamilton scoring in the final. With 5 caps and 4 goals for Scotland Hamilton also went to the 1954 FIFA World Cup finals.[2]

Billy Houliston from Dumfries while playing for Queens was capped three times by Scotland in 1948/49. He scored twice on his Scotland debut, a 3–2 Hampden win over Northern Ireland and played in the Wembley win against England (3–1). This 3rd cap was again at Hampden, the 2–0 win over France. In all Houliston collected 9 caps at different levels and never played in a losing Scotland side.[2]

Roy Henderson signed for Queens in 1946. He was selected 6 times as reserve goalkeeper for Scotland, but never selected to play ahead of Jimmy Cowan nor Bobby Brown. Roy spent 12 seasons with Queens until he broke his leg in a match v Dunfermline Athletic, bringing his career to an end. In a poll in the Dumfries & Galloway Standard in 2004 Henderson was voted the greatest ever Queens player.[2]

Jim Patterson is the club's record scorer (see below) and was honoured with one game for Scotland, when he led the Scottish attack v The Army in 1953 at Hampden Park. He gave Queens 14 years service.[2]

Jimmy Binning joined in 1951 and played 288 games in 7 years for Queens. The full back was recognised internationally when he was given a Scottish League cap in 1954 against the English League at Stamford Bridge. Although he was selected for the 22-man squad for the 1954 FIFA World Cup, Scotland only took 13 players to the finals. Binning was one of the players who stayed at home on reserve.[2]

Bobby Black (from Thornhill, another local boy) joined Queens in 1952 having already won the League Cup with East Fife. Black left Queens in 1961 having made 346 appearances scoring 120 times to make the outside right the club's second highest scorer of all time. He scored 2 goals in his 1 game for the Scottish League in Dublin in 1954.[2]

Ivor Broadis is the best known non Scot to have played for Queen of the South. The Londoner previously played for Carlisle United, Sunderland, Manchester City and Newcastle United and had scored 8 goals in 14 appearances for England. In his 3 games at the 1954 FIFA World Cup Broadis scored 2 goals both against Belgium. Broadis was the first Englishman to score twice in a game in the World Cup finals. Broadis joined Queens for the last of his playing days in 1959. The inside forward clearly enjoyed his fine displays at Queens later saying, "The two seasons I spent at Palmerston were the best of my career'.[2]

George Farm signed for Queens from Blackpool for £3000 in 1960. Farm had been at Blackpool since 1948 and was goalkeeper through the tangerines' 1950s golden era. This included 2 F.A. Cup Final appearances including winning the 1953 'Matthews' Final and also Blackpool's highest ever top league finish - 2nd in 1956. While at Blackpool he gained 10 Scotland caps. Farm went on to make over 100 league appearances for Queen of the South, as player-manager for three of his four years with the club. He guided them to promotion as Second Division runners-up in 1961–62. Farm later managed Dunfermline to their greatest achievement to date by following up the 1967/68 Scottish Cup win by reaching the semi final of the 1968–69 UEFA Cup Winners' Cup losing by 1 goal to eventual winners Slovan Bratislava.[2]

Neil Martin signed from Alloa for £2,000 in 1961. After leaving Queens he gained 3 Scotland caps in a journeyman career where he scored consistently as a hard working centre-forward. He hit 44 goals in 78 games at Queens. After Queens he played top division football for Hibs (playing for Jock Stein), Sunderland, Coventry City and Nottingham Forest (scoring the first goal of Brian Clough's reign) as well as playing for Brighton and Crystal Palace. He has the distinction of being among the first players to score 100 league goals in both Scotland and England.[2]

Ted McMinn (another local lad) played for Queens from 1982 - 84 before going on to play top flight football in Scotland, Spain and England. McMinn achieved hero status with Rangers, Sevilla and then following in the footsteps of Hughie Gallacher by also playing for Derby County. McMinn then went on to play further senior football in England for Birmingham City and Burnley.[2]

Bernie Slaven was an unrecognised talent at Queens. He played only two first team games for Queen of the South in late 1983.[25] On leaving Queens for Albion Rovers the goals started to flow quickly. His goals at Rovers included 27 in his 42 league games there. Following in the footsteps of Ian Dickson, Slaven joined Middlesbrough where he scored consistently hitting 146 goals in 381 games. In March 1993 Slaven left Premier League 'Boro for Port Vale and scored the winner in 2–1 victory over Stockport County in the Autoglass Trophy Final at Wembley. He was awarded 7 Republic of Ireland caps scoring once and was in their squad for Italia 90.

Jamie McAllister began his senior career at Palmerston from 1996 to '99 before going to play for Aberdeen, Livingston (where he was capped for Scotland and scored in Livi's 2004 Scottish League Cup final win) and Hearts. McAllister then moved to Bristol City with whom he made it to the 2007–08 English 2nd flight play off final for a place in the English Premier League.[6]

Andy Goram, ex-Rangers and Scotland goalkeeper, played for Queens in the 2002–03 Scottish Challenge Cup Final win. Added to the medals Goram gained at Hibs and Rangers this makes him the first player to collect a complete set of all four senior Scottish football winners medals.[1][26]

Robbie Neilson of Hearts also played in Challenge Cup Final win. Later capped by Scotland, Neilson speaks very highly of Queens from his loan period at Palmerston from August 2002 commenting, "I still hold the club in my heart and I look for their results on a Saturday after our game."[21]

Club records

One of Palmerston's record-breaking floodlights

Record appearances: 1) Allan Ball - 731 (819 in total including challenges, friendlies and testimonials) between 1963 and 1982. 2) Ian McChesney - 615. 3) Jim Patterson - 462. 4) Jackie Oakes - 457. 5) Dougie Sharpe - 431. 6) Jim Kerr - 403. 7) Jimmy Robertson - 400. 8) Roy Henderson - 381. 9) Willie Savage - 369. 10) Alan Davidson - 364.

Longest serving player: Ian McChesney - 1960 to 1981 (587 appearances and scored 79 goals)

Record scorers: 1) Jim Patterson - 251 goals, including 11 hat-tricks, in 462 appearances between 1949 and 1963. 2) Bobby Black - 120. 3) Andy Thomson - 114. These are the only 3 players in Queens' 'ton-up' club (Queens 4th highest scorer with 98 goals is Jocky Dempster, who like Bobby Black was a winger).

Record league scorer in a season: Jimmy Gray - 37 goals in season 1927/28

Record scorer (all competitions) in a Season: Jimmy Rutherford - 41 goals in season 1931/32

Record victory: 11–1 v. Stranraer, Scottish Cup, 16 January 1932

Record defeat: 2–10 v. Dundee at Dens Park, Scottish First Division, 1 December 1962. Queens played for 78 minutes with 10 men after goalkeeper George Farm was injured in the 12th minute and was carried off. Dundee's Alan Gilzean scored 7 that day. Dundee were reigning Scottish League Champions at the time and would make the European Cup semi finals that season where they lost to eventual winners A.C. Milan.

Record home attendance: 26,552 v Hearts, Scottish Cup 3rd round, 23 February 1952. Queens 1 Hearts 3

Record attendance (any venue): 58,975, 5 April 1950, Hampden Park, Scottish Cup semi-final replay 3–0 defeat to Rangers. 52,924 watched the 1–1 cup draw with Rangers 4 days earlier at the same venue.

Most league points (2 points for a win system): 55, Scottish Division 2, 1985–86

Most league points (3 points for a win system): 67, Scottish Division 2, 2001–02

Most capped player: Billy Houliston (3 caps in the victories against Northern Ireland at Hampden, England at Wenbley and France at Hampden. Houliston scored 2 goals, both on his debut against Northern Ireland)

Andy Aitken

First Queens players to earn four senior Scottish football medals while playing for the club - Jim Thomson and Andy Aitken (winners of the 2001/02 Second Division and 2002–03 Scottish Challenge Cup; runners up in the 1997–98 Scottish Challenge Cup and 2007–08 Scottish Cup).

Record transfer fee received: Andy Thomson - £250,000 to Southend United, 1994

Fastest hat trick: Tommy Bryce, 1 min 46 seconds (Guinness book of records)

Longest distance goal by an outfield player: Ryan McCann - 84 yards (77 m) in the Scottish Cup quarter final 2–0 victory over Dundee, 8 March 2008.

First player to collect a complete set of all four senior Scottish football winners medals: Andy Goram when he played in the 2002–03 Scottish Challenge Cup final 2–0 win for Queens against Brechin City to add to his medals haul gathered elsewhere

First ever Scottish League Match under floodlights: Rangers v Queen of the South, Ibrox Park, 7 March 1956.

Highest free standing floodlights in Scottish football: Queens' floodlights were first used on 29 October 1958 and at 85 feet (26 m) high they are the tallest in Scotland. To mark the occasion Preston North End sent a team north for a friendly match.

Highest terrace in Scottish football: Following the trend towards all seater stadiums the height differential between the lowest and highest step on the Portland Drive terrace makes this now the highest remaining terrace in Scottish football.

Oldest player to play for the club: Ally MacLeod v St. Mirren in the Reserve League West in April 1992. With Queens short of players the then manager named himself as a trialist and played the whole 90 minutes. During the second half Queens were awarded a penalty and the ex Scotland manager converted the kick. The final score was 7–1 to St. Mirren and MacLeod received a standing ovation from the small crowd at the end of the game. He was 61 at the time.

Honours

National League Competitions

Highest top division finish - 4th, 1933–34

Division 2 - Champions 1950/51, 2001/02; Runners Up - 1932–33, 1961–62, 1974–75, 1980–81, 1985–86

Division 3 - Runners Up 1924–25

National Cup Competitions

Scottish League Challenge Cup - Winners 2002–03, Runners-up 1997–98, Semi-finalists 1991–92

Scottish Qualifying Cup - Winners 1923–24

Scottish Cup - Runners up 2007–08, Semi-finalists 1949–50

Scottish League Cup - Semi-finalists 1950–51, 1960–61

B.P. Youth Cup Runners-up - 1985–86

Invitational Tournaments

1936 Algiers invitational tournament - Winners

Border Cup - Winners 1991–92, 1992–93

Scottish Brewers Cup - Winners 2000–01, 2001–02, 2006–07

Regional League Competitions

Scottish League South and West (Wartime League) - Runners Up 1939–40

Western League - Champions 1922–23

Southern Counties League - Winners 1996–97

Regional Cup Competitions (Competed for and won by the reserve team)

Southern Counties Charity Cup - Winners 1920–24, 1926,1930–32, 1934,1937

Southern Counties Cup - Winners 1921, 1924, 1935, 1936, 1962, 1966, 1972, 1976, 1982, 1983, 1987, 1988, 1991, 1997, 2003, 2004

Southern Counties League Cup - Winners 1996–97

Southern Counties Consolation Cup - Winners 1922

Potts Cup - Winners 1921, 1960, 1961

Individual awards

Second Division Manager of the Season - John Connolly - 2001–02

Second Division Player of the Season - Jimmy Robertson - 1980/81, Andy Thomson - 1991–92, 1993–94, John O'Neill - 2001–02

Bell's Scottish Football League Angels Award - 2003–04

Bell's Scottish Football League Fan of the Season - Ian Black - 2003–04

SFL Phenomenal achievement award - Gordon Chisholm, in recognition of Queens' remarkable cup run - 2007-08[27][1]

Biblical references

Queen of the South are often humorously cited as the only league club in the United Kingdom to be mentioned in the Bible. Luke 11:31 states "The queen of the South shall rise up at the judgment with the men of this generation and condemn them..."[28] Queen of the South is similarly quoted under Matthew 12:42.[29] In the biblical quote the "Queen of the South" is considered to be the Queen of Sheba.

Club mascot

Doogie the Doonhamer at Palmerston for the celebration of the 2007–08 QoS run to the Scottish Cup Final.

The club mascot is 'Doogie the Doonhamer', a human sized border collie.[30] The character has been played for many years by supermarket worker Brian Harkness.[31]

Notable fans

The following have been documented as Queens fans:

  • Music producer Bill Drummond (as well as being a self-confessed fan, the sixth track on his 1986 album The Man is also called "Queen of the South". The song is an instrumental). Drummond has been interviewed as a Queen of the South supporter for the club's website.[34]
  • Scotland international footballer Barry Nicholson is a fan of Queen of the South as his hometown club, although he has never played for Queens.[9]
  • Le Mans 24 hours double winner Allan McNish as well as having attended games at Palmerston has stated that regardless of where he is in the world, he always get an update telling him of the Queens score[35][36]
  • Broadcaster, author and journalist Hunter Davies, lived in Dumfries during his childhood and has stated that Queen of the South were the first team that he supported[37]
  • Dumfries-born rugby internationalist Nick De Luca applauded the efforts of his local football team for reaching the 2008 Scottish Cup Final against the odds after recording a shock 4–3 semi final win over Aberdeen. De Luca said: “It was really pleasing to see Queen of the South reach the Scottish Cup Final: that type of result is what sport is all about."[40]

Current squad

Note: Flags indicate national team as has been defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
Scotland GK Scott Fox
Scotland GK David Hutton
Scotland GK Mark McGeown
France GK Ludovic Roy
Trinidad and Tobago DF Marvin Andrews
Scotland DF Craig Barr
Scotland DF Robert Harris
Scotland DF David Lilley (Captain)
Scotland DF Marc McAusland
Scotland DF Gerry McLauchlan (on loan to Arbroath)
Scotland DF Jordan McMillan (on loan from Rangers)
Scotland DF Jim Thomson
Scotland DF Craig Reid
No. Position Player
Scotland MF Paul Burns
Scotland MF Joe Hamill (on loan from Livingston)
Scotland MF Stephen McKenna
Scotland MF Willie McLaren
Scotland MF Anthony McParland
Scotland MF Rocco Quinn
Scotland MF Neil Scally
Scotland MF Steve Tosh (on loan to Livingston)
Scotland FW Derek Holmes
Scotland FW Stewart Kean
England FW Leon Knight
Scotland FW David Weatherston

Managers

  • P/C = Player-coach P/M = Player-manager

1 Second Spell

Non-playing staff

Football performance

  • Manager: Gordon Chisholm
  • Assistant Manager: Kenny Brannigan
  • Physiotherapist: John Kerr
  • Groundsman: Kevin McCormick
  • Kitman: Ian Black

Boardroom, commercial, administration and historical

  • Chairman: Davie Rae
  • Vice Chairman: Craig Paterson
  • Non-Executive Director: Thomas Harkness
  • Non-Executive Director: William Hewitson
  • Non-Executive Director: Colin Rutherford
  • Honorary Director: Allan Ball
  • Club Secretary: Eric Moffat
  • Commercial Manager: Mark McMinn
  • Matchday Host Ian Heuchan
  • Press officer: Bill Goldie
  • Museum Curator and Club Historian: Ian Black
  • Accountant / Share registrar: Ewan Lithgow
  • Webmaster: Colin Johnstone
  • Podcast reporter: Sandra Brown
  • Supporters Travel Club Chairman: Eric Patterson

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br bs Club History on the official club website
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al Player career profiles on Queens Legends on the official club website
  3. ^ Irons ready to galvanise Gretna on judgment day - Scotsman.com Sport
  4. ^ a b 'DOWN HOME BOY For a man of only 41 he may have been round the block' - Sunday Herald, 18th Feb 2007
  5. ^ http://www.neilbrown.newcastlefans.com/player/bernieslaven.htm Newcastlefans.com
  6. ^ a b Jamie McAllister interview on www.qosfc.com
  7. ^ http://sport.scotsman.com/queenofthesouthfc/Queens-hit-by-20000-fine.3288272.jp
  8. ^ http://icdumfries.icnetwork.co.uk/gallowaynews/sport/tm_headline=mccall-grasps-the-thistle&method=full&objectid=19225906&siteid=77296-name_page.html
  9. ^ a b Barry Nicholson interview on qosfc.com
  10. ^ a b Queen of the South 4–3 Aberdeen: Queens victorious in epic semi - Scotland on Sunday
  11. ^ BBC SPORT | Football | My Club | Queen of the South | Chisholm bemoans Queens lay-off
  12. ^ BBC SPORT | Football | Scottish Cups | Queen of the South 2-3 Rangers
  13. ^ Goalscorer Tosh rants at referee and UEFA Cup - Scotsman.com Sport
  14. ^ Scottish Cup Final: 'Result is irrelevant, we're here to party' - Scotsman.com News
  15. ^ Dumfries and Galloway Standard Scottish Cup Final Special, page 6, '14 000 say thanks for the memories'
  16. ^ BBC NEWS | Scotland | South of Scotland | Town pays tribute to cup heroes
  17. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/football/scot_cups/7341879.stm
  18. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/football/europe/7560658.stm
  19. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/football/europe/7580935.stm
  20. ^ a b http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/football/europe/7581074.stm
  21. ^ a b Young stars should take step back to go forward - Scotsman.com Sport
  22. ^ http://news.scotsman.com/latestnews/Scottish-Cup-Final-39Result-is.4118419.jp
  23. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/south_of_scotland/7585602.stm
  24. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/south_of_scotland/7585602.stm
  25. ^ "Interview with George Cloy". qosfc.com. http://qosfc.com/AboutQueens/QueensLegends/tabid/115/Default.aspx. Retrieved 2009-06-21. 
  26. ^ BBC SPORT | Scotland | Queen of the South lift Bells Cup
  27. ^ Cup final manager Chisholm receives top award - Dumfries and Galloway Standard
  28. ^ "Luke 11:31; Luke 11:32 (English Standard Version)", BibleGateway.com, retrieved 15 April 2008
  29. ^ BibleGateway.com - Passage Lookup: Matthew 12:42
  30. ^ Football club mascots | Soccer Manager.com News
  31. ^ Border News and Lookaround, Border TV, 23 May 2008
  32. ^ Andrew Coltart interview on www.qosfc.com
  33. ^ Stephen Jardine interview on www.qosfc.com
  34. ^ Bill Drummond interview for the official Queen of the South website www.qosfc.com
  35. ^ Allan McNish interview on www.qosfc.com part 1
  36. ^ Allan McNish interview on www.qosfc.com part 2
  37. ^ 'Hunter Davies boyhood Doonhamer' on www.qosfc.com
  38. ^ Len Lungo interview on www.qosfc.com
  39. ^ http://scotlandonsunday.scotsman.com/topstories/Scottish-Cup-Final-39Result-is.4118419.jp
  40. ^ De Luca hopes for return to the pitch - Dumfries and Galloway Standard
  41. ^ A supporting role from Hollywood - Dumfries and Galloway Standard
  42. ^ http://www.qosfc.com/HeadlineNews/ViewFullStory/tabid/151/selectmoduleid/498/ArticleID/1073/reftab/54/Default.aspx Roger White interview on www.qosfc.com

External links


Simple English

Queen of the South F.C.
Full nameQueen of the South Football Club
Nickname(s)The Doonhamers, Queens
Founded1919
Groundalmerston Park,
Dumfries, Scotland
(Capacity 6,412)
ChairmanDavie Rae
ManagerGordon Chisholm
LeagueScottish First Division
2008/09Scottish First Division, 5th
 
Home colours
 
Away colours

Queen of the South Football Club is a Scottish professional football club founded in 1919 and located in Dumfries in south-west Scotland. They currently play in the Scottish First Division.

Officially nicknamed The Doonhamers, but usually referred to as Queens and sometimes as QoS (as also listed on the club badge), they have played their entire existence based at Palmerston Park on Terregles Street.

The club has won national honours, namely the 1950-51 B Division, the 2001-02 Scottish Second Division and the 2002-03 Scottish Challenge Cup. While Queens topped Scotland's top division until Christmas in season 1953-54 their highest-ever finish in the Scottish top flight was fourth in 1933-34. Their longest cup run was in the 2007-08 Scottish Cup, in which they reached the final and finished runners up.

The club is currently managed by Gordon Chisholm.

References


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