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Born November 19, 1954 (1954-11-19) (age 55),
Quebec City, QC, CAN
Height
Weight
5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)
170 lb (77 kg; 12 st 2 lb)
Position Goaltender
Caught Left
Pro clubs Atlanta Flames
Calgary Flames
Boston Bruins
Ntl. team  Canada
NHL Draft 125th overall, 1974
Philadelphia Flyers
WHA Draft 209th overall, 1974
Chicago Cougars
Career 1974 – 1993

Réjean M. "Reggie" Lemelin (born November 19, 1954, in Quebec City, Quebec) is a former National Hockey League goaltender. He was drafted by the Philadelphia Flyers in the seventh round, 125th overall, in the 1974 NHL Amateur Draft. He was also selected by the Chicago Cougars in the 1974 WHA Amateur Draft; however, he never played in the WHA, due to an argument with management.

After playing two seasons in the QMJHL with the Sherbrooke Beavers, Lemelin joined the North American Hockey League's Philadelphia Firebirds. His NHL debut came with the Atlanta Flames during the 1978–79 season.

Lemelin remained with the Flames through their move to Calgary, where he enjoyed the most success of his career. He split goaltending duties with Pat Riggin and then Don Edwards, earning the starting job in 1983, In 1984, he was named to the Canadian team that played in the 1984 Canada Cup. He played in two games, earning a win and a loss. After losing his starting job in Calgary to Mike Vernon, he joined the Boston Bruins for the 1987–88 season, and teamed with Andy Moog to win the NHL's William M. Jennings Trophy (for fewest team goals allowed) in the 1989–90 season.

Lemelin retired during the 1992–93 season. In his NHL career, he appeared in 507 games. After 13 seasons as the goaltending coach for the Philadelphia Flyers, he was replaced on June 25, 2009, by Jeff Reese. He also still plays in Boston area charity hockey games to this day, as a member of the Boston Bruins Alumni exhibition team as their goaltender.

Awards

External links

Preceded by
Patrick Roy and Brian Hayward
Winner of the William M. Jennings Trophy
1989–90
(w/Andy Moog)
Succeeded by
Ed Belfour
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