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RE1-silencing transcription factor: Wikis

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RE1-silencing transcription factor
Identifiers
Symbols REST; NRSF; XBR
External IDs OMIM600571 MGI104897 HomoloGene4099 GeneCards: REST Gene
RNA expression pattern
PBB GE REST 212920 at tn.png
PBB GE REST 204535 s at tn.png
More reference expression data
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez 5978 19712
Ensembl ENSG00000084093 ENSMUSG00000029249
UniProt Q13127 A0JNY8
RefSeq (mRNA) NM_005612 NM_011263
RefSeq (protein) NP_005603 NP_035393
Location (UCSC) Chr 4:
57.47 - 57.5 Mb
Chr 5:
78.34 - 78.36 Mb
PubMed search [1] [2]

RE1-Silencing Transcription factor (REST), also known as Neuron-Restrictive Silencer Factor (NRSF), is a protein which in humans is encoded by the REST gene.[1][2][3]

Contents

Function

This gene encodes a transcriptional repressor which represses neuronal genes in non-neuronal tissues. It is a member of the Kruppel-type zinc finger transcription factor family. It represses transcription by binding a DNA sequence element called the neuron-restrictive silencer element (NRSE, also known as RE1). The protein is also found in undifferentiated neuronal progenitor cells, and it is thought that this repressor may act as a master negative regulator of neurogenesis. Alternatively spliced transcript variants have been described; however, their full length nature has not been determined.[1]

REST contains 8 Cys2His2 zinc fingers and mediates gene repression by recruiting several chromatin-modifying enzymes.[4]

NRSF bound to DNA and cofactors on each of its two cofactor binding domains.  
Chromatin remodeling occurs, causing the gene to be 'turned off'.  

Interactions

RE1-silencing transcription factor has been shown to interact with RCOR1.[5]

References

  1. ^ a b "Entrez Gene: REST RE1-silencing transcription factor". http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=gene&Cmd=ShowDetailView&TermToSearch=5978.  
  2. ^ Schoenherr CJ, Anderson DJ (March 1995). "The neuron-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF): a coordinate repressor of multiple neuron-specific genes". Science (journal) 267 (5202): 1360–3. doi:10.1126/science.7871435. PMID 7871435.  
  3. ^ Chong JA, Tapia-Ramírez J, Kim S, Toledo-Aral JJ, Zheng Y, Boutros MC, Altshuller YM, Frohman MA, Kraner SD, Mandel G (March 1995). "REST: a mammalian silencer protein that restricts sodium channel gene expression to neurons". Cell 80 (6): 949–57. doi:10.1016/0092-8674(95)90298-8. PMID 7697725.  
  4. ^ Ooi L, Wood IC (July 2007). "Chromatin crosstalk in development and disease: lessons from REST". Nat. Rev. Genet. 8 (7): 544–54. doi:10.1038/nrg2100. PMID 17572692.  
  5. ^ Andrés, M E; Burger C, Peral-Rubio M J, Battaglioli E, Anderson M E, Grimes J, Dallman J, Ballas N, Mandel G (Aug. 1999). "CoREST: a functional corepressor required for regulation of neural-specific gene expression". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. (UNITED STATES) 96 (17): 9873–8. ISSN 0027-8424. PMID 10449787.  


Further reading

  • Ooi L and Wood IC (2007). "Chromatin crosstalk in development and disease: lessons from REST". Nat. Rev. Genet. 8 (6(7)): 544–54. doi:10.1038/nrg2100. PMID 17572692.  
  • Chong JA, Tapia-Ramírez J, Kim S, et al. (1995). "REST: a mammalian silencer protein that restricts sodium channel gene expression to neurons.". Cell 80 (6): 949–57. doi:10.1016/0092-8674(95)90298-8. PMID 7697725.  
  • Schoenherr CJ, Anderson DJ (1995). "The neuron-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF): a coordinate repressor of multiple neuron-specific genes.". Science 267 (5202): 1360–3. doi:10.1126/science.7871435. PMID 7871435.  
  • Scholl T, Stevens MB, Mahanta S, Strominger JL (1996). "A zinc finger protein that represses transcription of the human MHC class II gene, DPA.". J. Immunol. 156 (4): 1448–57. PMID 8568247.  
  • Thiel G, Lietz M, Cramer M (1998). "Biological activity and modular structure of RE-1-silencing transcription factor (REST), a repressor of neuronal genes.". J. Biol. Chem. 273 (41): 26891–9. doi:10.1074/jbc.273.41.26891. PMID 9756936.  
  • Andrés ME, Burger C, Peral-Rubio MJ, et al. (1999). "CoREST: a functional corepressor required for regulation of neural-specific gene expression.". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 96 (17): 9873–8. doi:10.1073/pnas.96.17.9873. PMID 10449787.  
  • Palm K, Metsis M, Timmusk T (1999). "Neuron-specific splicing of zinc finger transcription factor REST/NRSF/XBR is frequent in neuroblastomas and conserved in human, mouse and rat.". Brain Res. Mol. Brain Res. 72 (1): 30–9. doi:10.1016/S0169-328X(99)00196-5. PMID 10521596.  
  • Naruse Y, Aoki T, Kojima T, Mori N (2000). "Neural restrictive silencer factor recruits mSin3 and histone deacetylase complex to repress neuron-specific target genes.". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 96 (24): 13691–6. doi:10.1073/pnas.96.24.13691. PMID 10570134.  
  • Grimes JA, Nielsen SJ, Battaglioli E, et al. (2000). "The co-repressor mSin3A is a functional component of the REST-CoREST repressor complex.". J. Biol. Chem. 275 (13): 9461–7. doi:10.1074/jbc.275.13.9461. PMID 10734093.  
  • Coulson JM, Edgson JL, Woll PJ, Quinn JP (2000). "A splice variant of the neuron-restrictive silencer factor repressor is expressed in small cell lung cancer: a potential role in derepression of neuroendocrine genes and a useful clinical marker.". Cancer Res. 60 (7): 1840–4. PMID 10766169.  
  • Kojima T, Murai K, Naruse Y, et al. (2001). "Cell-type non-selective transcription of mouse and human genes encoding neural-restrictive silencer factor.". Brain Res. Mol. Brain Res. 90 (2): 174–86. doi:10.1016/S0169-328X(01)00107-3. PMID 11406295.  
  • Battaglioli E, Andrés ME, Rose DW, et al. (2002). "REST repression of neuronal genes requires components of the hSWI.SNF complex.". J. Biol. Chem. 277 (43): 41038–45. doi:10.1074/jbc.M205691200. PMID 12192000.  
  • Lunyak VV, Burgess R, Prefontaine GG, et al. (2002). "Corepressor-dependent silencing of chromosomal regions encoding neuronal genes.". Science 298 (5599): 1747–52. doi:10.1126/science.1076469. PMID 12399542.  
  • Strausberg RL, Feingold EA, Grouse LH, et al. (2003). "Generation and initial analysis of more than 15,000 full-length human and mouse cDNA sequences.". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99 (26): 16899–903. doi:10.1073/pnas.242603899. PMID 12477932.  
  • Lietz M, Hohl M, Thiel G (2003). "RE-1 silencing transcription factor (REST) regulates human synaptophysin gene transcription through an intronic sequence-specific DNA-binding site.". Eur. J. Biochem. 270 (1): 2–9. doi:10.1046/j.1432-1033.2003.03360.x. PMID 12492469.  
  • Hersh LB, Shimojo M (2003). "Regulation of cholinergic gene expression by the neuron restrictive silencer factor/repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor.". Life Sci. 72 (18-19): 2021–8. doi:10.1016/S0024-3205(03)00065-1. PMID 12628452.  
  • Kemp DM, Lin JC, Habener JF (2003). "Regulation of Pax4 paired homeodomain gene by neuron-restrictive silencer factor.". J. Biol. Chem. 278 (37): 35057–62. doi:10.1074/jbc.M305891200. PMID 12829700.  
  • Zuccato C, Tartari M, Crotti A, et al. (2003). "Huntingtin interacts with REST/NRSF to modulate the transcription of NRSE-controlled neuronal genes.". Nat. Genet. 35 (1): 76–83. doi:10.1038/ng1219. PMID 12881722.  
  • Martin D, Tawadros T, Meylan L, et al. (2004). "Critical role of the transcriptional repressor neuron-restrictive silencer factor in the specific control of connexin36 in insulin-producing cell lines.". J. Biol. Chem. 278 (52): 53082–9. doi:10.1074/jbc.M306861200. PMID 14565956.  
  • Kuwahara K, Saito Y, Takano M, et al. (2004). "NRSF regulates the fetal cardiac gene program and maintains normal cardiac structure and function.". Embo J. 22 (23): 6310–21. doi:10.1093/emboj/cdg601. PMID 14633990.  
  • Kuwabara T, Hsieh J, Nakashima K, et al. (2004). "A small modulatory dsRNA specifies the fate of adult neural stem cells.". Cell 116 (6): 779–93. doi:10.1016/S0092-8674(04)00248-X. PMID 15035981.  

External links

This article incorporates text from the United States National Library of Medicine, which is in the public domain.

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