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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Radical, from Late Latin radicalis "of roots" and from Latin radix "root", may refer to:

in science and mathematics
in medicine
  • Radical surgery, surgery carried out in extreme circumstances and/or with extensive treatment
in linguistics
in politics

Extremism, political standpoints that are perceived as revolutionary or extreme

  • Radical Whigs, influential early writers on Radicalism
  • Radical Reformation, an Anabaptist movement concurrent with the Protestant Reformation
  • Radical Republicans, a member of an influential group of American politicians during the Civil War reconstruction
  • Radical Party, one of a number of political parties around the world
  • Radicals (UK), parliamentary progressives who were part of the nineteenth-century Liberal coalition
  • Radical feminism, a current within feminism that focuses on patriarchy as a system of power
  • Radical veganism, a radical interpretation of veganism, usually combined with anarchism
in culture
  • Radical chic, a term coined by Tom Wolfe to describe the pretentious adoption of radical causes by celebrities, socialites, and high society
in architecture
  • Radical Baroque, an architectural style characterized by the curvature of walls and intersection of oval spaces
brands, titles and proper names

See also


1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

RADICAL (Lat. radix, a root), in English politics, a term applied to politicians who desire to make thorough, or radical, changes in the constitution and in the social order generally. Although it had been used in a somewhat similar way during the reign of Charles II., the term Radical, in its political sense, originated about the end of the 18th century, probably owing its existence to Charles James Fox, who, in 1797, declared that "radical reform" was necessary. The ideas of the first Radicals were borrowed largely from the authors of the French Revolution. The word was more generally employed during the disturbed period between the close of the Napoleonic wars and the passing of the great Reform Bill of 1832, and was applied to agitators like Henry Hunt and William Cobbett. After the Reform Bill had become law, the advocates of violent change were drawn into the Chartist movement, and the Radicals became less revolutionary both in speech and object. Thus in 1842 an observer writes:"The term Radical, once employed as a name of low reproach, has found its way into high places, and is gone forth as the title of a class who glory in their designation." About this time many members of Parliament were known as Radicals, among these men being George Grote and Joseph Hume. The Radicals never formed a distinct party in the House of Commons, and subsequently they formed simply the advanced section of the Liberal party. For a few years in the 19th century the wearing of a white hat was looked upon as the distinguishing mark of a Radical, a hat of this colour having been worn by Hunt when addressing meetings.

See W. Harris, History of the Radical Party in Parliament (1885); S. Bamford, Passages in the Life of a Radical (new ed., 1893); C. B. Roylance Kent, The English Radicals:. an Historical Sketch (1899).


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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010
(Redirected to radical article)

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

Contents

English

Etymology

< French radical < Late Latin radicalis (of or pertaining to the root, having roots, radical) < Latin radix (root); see radix.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: rădʹĭk-əl, IPA: /ˈɹædɪkəl/, SAMPA: /"r{dIk@l/
  • Homophones: radicle

Adjective

radical (comparative more radical, superlative most radical)

Positive
radical

Comparative
more radical

Superlative
most radical

  1. Favouring fundamental change, or change at the root cause of a matter.
    His beliefs are radical.
  2. (botany, not comparable) Of or pertaining to a root (of a plant).
  3. Of or pertaining to the intrinsic nature of something.
  4. Thoroughgoing.
    The spread of the cancer required radical surgery, and the entire organ was removed.
  5. (linguistics, not comparable) Of or pertaining to the root of a word.
  6. (chemistry, not comparable) Involving free radicals
  7. (slang) Excellent.
    That was a radical jump!

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Noun

Singular
radical

Plural
radicals

radical (plural radicals)

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Wikipedia

  1. (historical: 19th-century England) A member of the most progressive wing of the Liberal Party; someone favouring social reform (but generally stopping short of socialism).
  2. (historical: early 20th-century France) A member of an influential, centrist political party favouring moderate social reform, a republican constitution, and secular politics.
  3. A person with radical opinions.
  4. (arithmetic) A root (of a number or quantity).
  5. (linguistics) In logographic writing systems as the Chinese writing system, the portion of a character (if any) that provides an indication of its meaning, as opposed to phonetic.
  6. (linguistics) In Semitic languages, any one of the set of consonants (typically three) that make up a root.
  7. (chemistry) A group of atoms, joined by covalent bonds, that take part in reactions as a single unit.
  8. (organic chemistry) A free radical.

Derived terms

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

External links

  • radical in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913
  • radical in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911

Anagrams


French

Pronunciation

Adjective

radical m. (f. radicale, m. plural radicaux, f. plural radicales)

  1. radical

Galician

Noun

radical m. (plural radicais)

  1. radical (in various senses)

Spanish

Adjective

radical m. and f. (plural radicales)

  1. radical

Noun

radical m. and f. (plural radicales)

  1. radical

Simple English

Radical, from Late Latin radicalis "of roots" and from Latin radix "root", may refer to:

in science and mathematics
  • A radical (chemistry) is an atom, molecule, or ion which is likely to take part in chemical reactions.
  • Radical symbol (√), a symbol used to indicate the square root or nth root
  • Radical of an algebraic group, a concept in algebraic group theory
  • Radical of an ideal, an important concept in abstract algebra
  • Radical of a ring, in ring theory, a branch of mathematics, a radical of a ring is an ideal of "bad" elements of the ring
  • Radical of a module, in the theory of modules, the radical of a module is a component in the theory of structure and classification
  • Jacobson radical, the Jacobson radical of a ring, R, consists of those elements in R which annihilate all simple right R-modules
  • Nilradical of a ring, the nilradical of a commutative ring is a nilpotent ideal, which is as large as possible
  • Nilradical of a Lie algebra, the nilradical of a lie algebra is a nilpotent ideal, which is as large as possible
  • Radical of an integer, a concept in number theory
  • Symmetric bilinear form, a concept in linear algebra
  • Radical of a Lie algebra, a concept in lie theory
in medicine
  • Radical surgery, surgery carried out in extreme circumstances and/or with extensive treatment
in linguistics
  • Root (linguistics), also called a "radical", the form of a word after any prefixes and suffixes are removed
  • Radical (Chinese character), part of a Chinese character under which it is indexed in a dictionary (also called bùshǒu 部首)
  • Radical, one of the three consonants in a Semitic root
  • Radical consonant, a consonant articulated with the root of the tongue
in politics
  • Political radicalism
    • Radicalism (historical), the Radical Movement which began in late 18th century Britain and spread to continental Europe and Latin America in the 19th century
    • Radical left, another term for the far left
    • Radical right, another term for the far right
    • radical a person who shows a strong political stand point

Extremism, political standpoints that are perceived as revolutionary or extreme

  • Radical Whigs, influential early writers on Radicalism
  • Radical Reformation, an Anabaptist movement concurrent with the Protestant Reformation
  • Radical Republicans, a member of an influential group of American politicians during the Civil War reconstruction
  • Radical Party, one of a number of political parties around the world
  • Radicals (UK), parliamentary progressives who were part of the nineteenth-century Liberal coalition
  • Radical feminism, a current within feminism that focuses on patriarchy as a system of power
  • Radical veganism, a radical interpretation of veganism, usually combined with anarchism
in culture
  • Radical chic, a term coined by Tom Wolfe to describe the pretentious adoption of radical causes by celebrities, socialites, and high society
in architecture
  • Radical Baroque, an architectural style characterized by the curvature of walls and intersection of oval spaces
brands, titles and proper names
  • Radical Sportscars, an English sports car maker
  • Radical Entertainment, a video game developer based in Vancouver, Canada
  • Free Radical Design, a video game developer based in Nottingham, England
  • Free Radicals (band), a jazz-funk musical group from Houston, Texas
  • Free Radical Centre, a centre for free radical chemistry and biotechnology that was established in 2005
  • Radical (Smack album), Smack's fourth studio album, released in 1988








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