The Full Wiki

More info on Rat für deutsche Rechtschreibung

Rat für deutsche Rechtschreibung: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Rat für deutsche Rechtschreibung (RdR; German for "Council for German Orthography") is the main international body regulating the German language.

With its seat being in Mannheim, Germany, the RdR was formed in 2004 as a successor to the Zwischenstaatliche Kommission für deutsche Rechtschreibung ("Intergovernmental Commission for German Orthography") in order to comprise proponents as well as opponents to the German orthography reform of 1996 (and subsequent reforms).

Currently the RdR is composed of 39 members from the following states and regions:

Despite having German as one of its official languages, Luxembourg, which was not involved in devising the reform of 1996, is not part of the council. The government of Luxembourg unilaterally adopted the reform and, due to its efficiency, it is well-accepted by the country's teachers. According to the duchy's largest newspaper, the Luxemburger Wort, Luxembourg does not perceive itself as a "German-speaking country" (the only national language is Luxembourgish) and thus had no right to take part in the council[1]. However, it is interesting to note, that Luxembourg does participate in the Francophonie and has members in the Académie française on the other hand, despite French being only an official language as well.[2]

The chairman of the Gesellschaft für deutsche Sprache is a member of the council. In 2003, the RdR, the GfdS, the Goethe Institute and the Institute of the German Language, founded the German Language Council (Deutscher Sprachrat) which was later also joined by the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD).

External links

References

  1. ^ Luxemburger Wort, 9. August 2004
  2. ^ http://www.francophonie.org/oif/membres.cfm
Advertisements

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message