Raymond Floyd: Wikis

  
  

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Raymond Floyd
Personal information
Full name Raymond Loran Floyd
Born September 4, 1942 (1942-09-04) (age 67)
Fort Bragg, North Carolina
Height 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Weight 200 lb (91 kg; 14 st)
Nationality  United States
Residence Palm Beach, Florida
Career
College University of North Carolina
Turned professional 1961
Current tour(s) Champions Tour (joined 1992)
PGA Tour (joined 1963)
Professional wins 66
Number of wins by tour
PGA Tour 22 (tied 27th all time)
Champions Tour 14 (tied 15th all time)
Other 11(regular)
19 (senior)
Best results in Major Championships
(Wins: 4)
The Masters Won 1976
U.S. Open Won 1986
Open Championship T2: 1978
PGA Championship Won: 1969, 1982
Achievements and awards
World Golf Hall of Fame 1989 (member page)
Vardon Trophy 1983
Byron Nelson Award 1983

Raymond Loran "Ray" Floyd (born September 4, 1942) is an American professional golfer who has won numerous tournaments on both the PGA Tour and Champions Tour.

Floyd was born at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. He attended the University of North Carolina. He turned professional in 1961, and quickly established himself on the PGA Tour, with his first victory coming at the St. Petersburg Open Invitational in 1963. He went on to win 22 times on tour, with his final win coming in 1992 at the age of 49, making him one of the oldest players to win a PGA Tour event. He also won on the Champions Tour later that season, making him the first player to win on both tours in the same year.

Floyd's wins included four major championships: the 1969 and 1982 PGA Championships; the 1976 Masters; and the 1986 U.S. Open. He ranks among the oldest players to have won a major. In addition, he came very close to becoming the first player to have won major championships in four different decades, most notably at The Masters in 1990, where he lost in a playoff to Nick Faldo. Floyd finished 1982 ranked second in Mark McCormack's world golf rankings, behind only Tom Watson who had won two majors that season, and in 1992 he finished the year ranked 14th on the Official World Golf Rankings at the age of 50, one of the highest positions ever attained by a player of that age.

Floyd's successful run continued after he became eligible to compete on the Senior PGA Tour, now the Champions Tour, in 1992, with 14 wins between 1992 and 2000, including four senior majors and two Senior Tour Championships. On his decision to continue playing professional golf on the Senior Tour, Floyd spoke with Golf Digest and mused aloud: "Why do I enjoy golf after 31 years, going out there and doing things that are necessary to be competitive—having practice, having to work, having to dedicate yourself? I guess it comes down to the competition. My personality...I'm not going to play if I'm not competitive."[1]

In addition to his victories on these two main tours, Floyd won at least 24 additional tournaments around the world, taking his total victory tally to at least 60 events. He played for the U.S. on eight Ryder Cup teams (1969, 1975, 1977, 1981, 1983, 1985, 1991, and 1993) and captained the team in 1989, and was an assistant captain in 2008. He won the Vardon Trophy for lowest scoring average on the PGA Tour in 1983.

Floyd was inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame in 1989.

Contents

PGA Tour wins (22)

Major championships shown in bold.

Other wins (11)

Champions Tour wins (14)

Senior majors are shown in bold.

Other senior wins (19)

Major Championships

Wins (4)

Year Championship 54 Holes Winning Score Margin Runner(s)-up
1969 PGA Championship 5 shot lead -8 (69-66-67-74 = 276) 1 stroke South Africa Gary Player
1976 The Masters 8 shot lead -17 (65-66-70-70 = 271) 8 strokes United States Ben Crenshaw
1982 PGA Championship (2) 5 shot lead -8 (63-69-68-72 = 272) 3 strokes United States Lanny Wadkins
1986 U.S. Open 3 shot deficit -1 (75-68-70-66 = 279) 2 strokes United States Chip Beck, United States Lanny Wadkins

Results timeline

Tournament 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969
The Masters DNP DNP CUT T8 CUT T7 T36
U.S. Open DNP T14 T6 WD T38 DNP T13
The Open Championship DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP T34
PGA Championship T57 DNP T17 T18 T20 T41 1
Tournament 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979
The Masters CUT T13 CUT 54 T22 T30 1 T8 T16 T17
U.S. Open T22 8 CUT 16 T15 T12 13 T47 T12 CUT
The Open Championship CUT DNP DNP DNP DNP T23 4 8 T2 T36
PGA Championship T8 CUT T4 T35 T11 T10 T2 T40 T50 T62
Tournament 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989
The Masters T17 T8 T7 T4 T15 T2 CUT CUT T11 T38
U.S. Open T47 T37 T49 T13 T52 T23 1 T43 T17 T26
The Open Championship DNP T3 T15 T14 CUT DNP T16 T17 CUT T42
PGA Championship T17 T19 1 T20 T13 CUT CUT T14 T9 T46
Tournament 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999
The Masters 2 T17 2 T11 T10 T17 T25 CUT CUT T38
U.S. Open CUT T8 T44 T7 DNP T36 DNP DNP DNP DNP
The Open Championship T39 CUT T12 T34 DNP T58 DNP DNP DNP DNP
PGA Championship T49 T7 T48 CUT T61 DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
Tournament 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
The Masters CUT CUT CUT CUT CUT CUT CUT CUT CUT CUT
U.S. Open DNP DNP DNP DNP CUT DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
The Open Championship DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP
PGA Championship DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP DNP

DNP = did not play
CUT = missed the half way cut
"T" indicates a tie for a place.
Green background for wins. Yellow background for top-10.

See also

References

  1. ^ The Gigantic Book of Golf Quotations, ed. Jim Apfelbaum. 2007.

External links








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