The Full Wiki

More info on Raymond Nels Nelson

Raymond Nels Nelson: Wikis

Advertisements
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Raymond Nels Nelson (1922 - June 1, 1981) was bureau chief of The Providence Journal and Evening Bulletin in Warwick, Rhode Island, United States, and later a member of Senatorial candidate Claiborne Pell's team. He was murdered in 1981.

Contents

Life

Nelson began his career at The Journal as a typist after his honorable discharge from the Navy. After rising to bureau chief he was tapped to join the staff of Claiborne Pell, a former officer with the Foreign Service and intelligence agent groomed for political office of Rhode Island.

Nelson managed Pell's first Senate campaign and, when Pell was elected, Nelson went to Washington DC as his Administrative Assistant (AA). Nelson was seemingly a happily married family man with three children and a home in Bethesda, Maryland.

In the 1970s, Nelson changed his conservative style of attire and began dressing in the popular 'Carnaby Street' style of the era. Shortly thereafter he openly declared himself a gay man and left his suburban home to live in the city. He remained good friends with his wife and maintained contact with his children.

Pell, though an active supporter of gay rights, relegated Nelson to a lesser job in a basement office of the Senate Rules Committee and appointed another important member of his staff, Paul Goulding, as his new AA.

Death

Nelson was murdered in his apartment near Capitol Hill in Washington D.C. at 701 Quincy Street, NE, in Washington on June 1, 1981.[1] Rumors abounded hinting that the murder was a result of a lovers' triangle, as well as decades old speculation about Senator Pell, after he was arrested during a raid at a New York City gay bar in the early 1960s.[2]

There is a $25,000 reward for information. Nelson was 59 years old.[3]

References

  1. ^ Unsolved Homicides in DC
  2. ^ The Washington Pay-Off; An Insider's View of Corruption in Government, by Robert N. Winter-Berger; Lyle Stuart, Inc., Copyright 1972
  3. ^ Bio of Nelson's Life & Death

External links

Advertisements

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message