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Legal recognition of
same-sex couples
Same-sex marriage

Belgium
Canada
Netherlands
Norway

South Africa
Spain
Sweden

Performed in some jurisdictions

Mexico: DF*
United States: CT, DC*, IA, MA, NH, VT, Coquille

Recognized, not performed

Israel
United States: CA (conditional), NY

Civil unions and
registered partnerships

Andorra
Austria
Colombia
Czech Republic
Denmark
Ecuador
Finland
France
Germany
Greenland

Hungary
Iceland
Luxembourg
New Caledonia
New Zealand
Slovenia
Switzerland
Wallis and Futuna
United Kingdom
Uruguay

Performed in some jurisdictions

Argentina: BA, RC, RN, VCP
Australia: ACT, TAS, VIC
Mexico: COA
United States: CA, CO, HI, ME, NJ, NV, OR, WA, WI
Venezuela: ME

Recognized, not performed

Isle of Man (UK only)

Unregistered co-habitation

Argentina
Australia
Brazil

Croatia
Israel
Portugal

In some regions

United States: MD, RI

Status in other jurisdictions

Albania
Aruba
Bolivia
Bulgaria
Burundi
Cambodia
Chile
China (PRC)
ROC (Taiwan)
Congo (DRC)
Costa Rica
Cuba
Dominican Republic
El Salvador
Estonia
European Union
Faroe Islands
Greece
Honduras
India
Ireland
Italy
Jamaica
Japan
Jersey

Kosovo
Latvia
Liechtenstein
Lithuania
Malta
Moldova
Montenegro
Nepal
Netherlands Antilles
Nigeria
Panama
Paraguay
Philippines
Poland
Romania
Russia
Serbia
Slovakia
Singapore
South Korea
Uganda
Ukraine
Venezuela
Vietnam

United States: AL, AS, AZ, DE, FL, GU, IL, LA, ME, MI, MN, MT, NM, NC, OH, PA, PR, RI, SC, UT, WV, WY, Native Americans

Notes

*DC (subject to Congressional review) and Mexico City same-sex marriage laws are effective from 1 March and 4 March 2010, respectively.

See also

Same-sex marriage
Same-sex marriage legislation
Timeline of same-sex marriage
Civil union
Domestic partnership
Registered partnership
Civil partnership
Listings by country

LGBT portal

Registered partnerships (Danish: registreret partnerskab) in Denmark were created by a law enacted on June 7, 1989, the world's first such law, and came into force on October 1, 1989. It was extended to Greenland in 1996 and later amended in 1999. Similar to civil unions in the United States or civil partnerships in the United Kingdom, registered partnerships have almost all the same qualities as marriage. All legal and fiscal rights and obligations are like those of opposite-sex marriage, with the following three exceptions:

  • registered partners cannot have joint custody of a child, except by adoption  
  • laws making explicit reference to the sexes of a married couple do not apply to registered partnerships
  • regulations by international treaties do not apply unless all signatories agree.

Divorce for registered partners follow the same rules as opposite-sex divorces.

Registered partners must meet one of the following residency requirements to form a union: (1) one partner must be a Danish citizen and be resident in Denmark, or (2) both parties must have been resident in Denmark for two years. Citizens of Finland, Iceland, and Norway are treated as Danish citizens for purposes of the residency requirements. Additionally, the Justice Minister may order citizenship in any other country with a law similar to Denmark's be treated as a citizen of Denmark.[1]

On March 17, 2009, the Folketing introduced a bill that gives same-sex couples in registered partnerships the right to adopt jointly.[2]

Contents

Role of the state church

Registered partnership is by civil ceremony only. The Church of Denmark, the Lutheran state church, which is generally more conservative about same-sex issues than the Danish people, has yet to decide how to handle the issue, but the general attitude of the church seems approving but hesitant. Some priests perform blessings of gay couples, and this is accepted since 1997 by the church, which states that the church blesses people, not institutions.

Same-sex marriage

Despite being the first country in the world to introduce registered partnerships for same-sex couples, same-sex marriage has not been debated in Denmark as much as in other Nordic countries. Indeed, Norway and Sweden have already legalised full same-sex marriage. The Social Liberal Party is the most vocal proponent of same-sex marriage in Denmark.[3] In 2006, five Social Liberal MPs tabled a resolution that asked the Government to draft a gender-neutral marriage law. The resolution was debated in Parliament and opposed by members of the conservative governing coalition.[4] The Minister for the Family, Carina Christensen, argued that registered partners already had the same rights as married partners except the ability to marry in church, and thus that gender-neutral marriage was unnecessary.[5] Aside from the Social Liberals, the resolution received support from left-wing parties such as the Red-Green Alliance, the Socialist People's Party and the Social Democrats.

In January 2008, the Social Liberal Party's Equality Rapporteur, Lone Dybkjær, once again called for gender-neutral marriage (kønsneutrale ægteskab).[6] However, it is unlikely that any progress will be made under the current governing coalition.

The Copenhagen Mayor for Culture and Recreation, Pia Allerslev, from the conservative governing Venstre party, has also publicly supported same-sex marriage,[7] as has the Lord Mayor of Copenhagen, Ritt Bjerregaard.[8]

The Prime Minister of Denmark between November 2001 and April 2009, Anders Fogh Rasmussen, was personally in favour of gender-neutral marriage, as well as religious marriages for same-sex couples in the Church of Denmark, but insisted that he was speaking in his personal capacity as a church member, and not as Prime Minister. The opposition Social Democrats criticised him for a lack of action on same-sex marriage, arguing that Denmark was falling behind its Scandinavian neighbours.[9]

In July 2009, at a human rights conference organised as part of the World Outgames held in Copenhagen, Kamal Qureshi of the Socialist People's Party expressed his strong support for same-sex marriage. He stated that, by not legalising same-sex marriage, including church marriages, "Denmark has laws forbidding human rights".[10]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Act on Registered Partnerships, as amended". http://books.google.com/books?id=mcI7C7JgtDMC&pg=PA215&lpg=PA215&dq=denmark+registered+partnership+1999&source=web&ots=4qs6mrPJns&sig=wzA9Ta24DWY3i3wMSXPNlcLtDXI&hl=en.  
  2. ^ Parliamentary majority for same-sex adoption
  3. ^ [1], [2]
  4. ^ (Danish) [3]
  5. ^ [4]
  6. ^ [5]
  7. ^ Ægtefolk af samme køn, Politiken, 19 April 2009
  8. ^ S og V vil kalde homo-vielser for ægteskab, Politiken, 24 August 2009
  9. ^ Fogh i samråd om homoseksuelles rettigheder
  10. ^ Politician speaks out on minority rights

External links

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