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Renault 19
Renault 19 5-door
Renault19cab.JPG
Manufacturer Renault
Production 1988-2000
Assembly Douai, France
Maubeuge, France
Taichung,Taiwan
Vilvoorde, Belgium
Valladolid, Spain
Palencia, Spain
Setubal, Portugal
Envigado, Colombia
Mariara, Venezuela
Santa Isabel, Argentina
Curitiba, Brazil
Bursa, Turkey
Predecessor Renault 9 / Renault 11
Successor Renault Mégane I
Class Small family car
Body style(s) 3/5-door hatchback
4-door saloon ("Chamade")
2-door convertible
Layout FF layout
Engine(s) 1.2 L Cléon
1.2 L Energy
1.4 L Cléon
1.4 L Energy
1.6 L Cléon
1.7 L F-Type
1.8 L F-Type
1.9 L F-Type Diesel
Length Hatchback: 4,156 mm (163.6 in)
Chamade: 4,248 mm (167.2 in)
Width 1,694 mm (66.7 in)
Height 1,412 mm (55.6 in)
Curb weight 886 kg (1,953 lb)–1,175 kg (2,590 lb)
Related Renault Mégane I
Designer Giorgetto Giugiaro
Renault 19 hatchback pre-facelift (Phase 1)
Renault 19 Chamade pre-facelift (Phase 1)
Renault 19 16V Cabriolet post-facelift (Phase 2)

The Renault 19 is a small family car that was produced by the French car manufacturer Renault between 1988 and 2000.

Contents

Overview

The R19 was the replacement for the 9 and 11, both of which were ageing and outdated by the late 1980s. The R19 was styled by Giorgetto Giugiaro, featuring Renault's new E-type (or "Energy") 1.4 L engine and F-type 1.7 and 1.8 L versions. Base models used the OHV C-type Cléon 1.2 and 1.4 L engines, depending on the market.

Intended to be Renault's last numeric-named car, the 19 ushered in a new naming policy, with the saloon versions of the 19 being known as the 19 Chamade to distinguish them from the hatchbacks. The Chamade badge was dropped following the 1992 facelift. In 1991 a convertible bodystyle built by Karmann was introduced. Although the R19's exterior design (which was relatively conservative, like that of the Renault 9/11) received a muted response, it was praised for its interior comfort and handling.

In the summer of 1992, a revamped model was introduced with a substantially restyled front and rear, while left hand drive market versions received a new dashboard and interior — right hand drive models retained the original design.

The R19 was sold in Europe until 1996, and was produced for South American markets in Argentina until 2000. The R19's platform and running gear would continue to be used in its replacement, the first generation Renault Mégane.

The Renault 19 was awarded the 1989 Car Of The Year in Spain and Germany and 1993 Car Of The Year in Argentina.

Engines

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Petrol

  • 1.2 "C2G" (1239 cc) 8-valve carburettor, 55 PS (40 kW; 54 hp); top speed: 156 km/h (97 mph)
  • 1.2e "Energy" "E7F" (1171 cc) 8-valve single point injection, 62 PS (46 kW; 61 hp); top speed: 158 km/h (98 mph)
  • 1.4 "C2J" (1397 cc) 8-valve carburettor, 65 PS (48 kW; 64 hp); top speed: 159 km/h (99 mph)
  • 1.4e "Energy" "E6J" (1390 cc) 8-valve carburettor 80 PS (59 kW; 79 hp); top speed: 173 km/h (107 mph)
  • 1.6 "C2L" (1565 cc) 8-valve carburettor, 78 PS (57 kW; 77 hp); top speed: 166.6 km/h (104 mph)
  • 1.6i "C3L" (1565 cc) 8-valve single point injection, 74 PS (54 kW; 73 hp); top speed: 165 km/h (103 mph)
  • 1.7 "F2N" (1721 cc) 8-valve carburettor, 92 PS (68 kW; 91 hp); top speed: 178 km/h (111 mph)
  • 1.7ie "F3N" (1721 cc) 8-valve multi-point injection, 107 PS (79 kW; 106 hp); top speed: 190 km/h (118 mph)
  • 1.8i "F2P" (1794 cc) 8-valve single point injection, 95 PS (70 kW; 94 hp); top speed: 185 km/h (115 mph)
  • 1.8ie "F3P" (1794 cc) 8-valve multi-point injection, 107 PS (79 kW; 106 hp); top speed: 194 km/h (121 mph)
  • 1.8ie "F3P" (1794 cc) 8-valve multi-point injection, 113 PS (83 kW; 111 hp); top speed: 197 km/h (122 mph)
  • 1.8 16S "F7P" (1764 cc) 16-valve multipoint injection, 137 PS (101 kW; 135 hp); top speed: 212 km/h (132 mph)
  • 1.8 16S "F7P" (1764 cc) 16-valve multipoint injection, 140 PS (103 kW; 138 hp); top speed: 215 km/h (134 mph)

Diesel

  • 1.9 d "F8Q" (1870 cc) 8-valve injection pump, 65 PS (48 kW; 64 hp); 162 km/h (101 mph)
  • 1.9 d "F8Q" (1870 cc) 8-valve injection pump, 70 PS (51 kW; 69 hp); 166 km/h (103 mph)
  • 1.9 dT "F8Q" (1870 cc) 8-valve injection pump + turbo, 92 PS (68 kW; 91 hp); top speed: 183 km/h (114 mph)
  • 1.9 dTi "F8Q" (1870 cc) 8-valve direct injection + turbo, 98 PS (72 kW; 97 hp); top speed: 187 km/h (116 mph)

Manufacturing factories

19 16v and Renault Sport

The Renault 19 16S hot hatch had a distinctive air inlet on the bonnet, a rear spoiler, 15 inch "Speedline" alloy wheels, side skirts, twin headlamps, bucket seats and a trip computer. The braking system was uprated to include 259 mm (10.2 in) vented discs on the front and 237 mm (9.3 in) discs on the rear as well as an uprated lower suspension setup. Phase 1 editions also benefited from unique front and rear bumpers with front indicators relocated into the bumpers to allow for the twin headlamps, while the Phase 2 retained the original bumpers found throughout the range but added colour-coded tops, rubber inserts and discreet lower splitter.

The very last models were called Executive and came with leather interior as standard. A 16S version was also produced in Europe which was as above however the earliest models did not sport the bonnet vent. The phase 2 models gear ratios were also revised to allow for the extra weight found in the safety equipment the later models carried. Renault claimed an acceleration from 0 to 100 km/h (62 mph) of 8.2 seconds. Each model boasted 137 PS (101 kW; 135 hp) in a catalysed form (Phase I included a non-catalysed version with 140 PS (103 kW; 138 hp)) and a top speed of 215 km/h (134 mph). [1]

References

  1. ^ 1991 Katalog der Automobil Revue, Automobil Revue Katalog, Bern, Switzerland: Hallwag AG, 1991, pp. 511, ISBN 3-444-00514-8  

External links


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