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Siena
—  Comune  —
Comune di Siena

Coat of arms
Siena within the Province of Siena and Tuscany
Country Italy
Region Tuscany
Province Siena (SI)
Frazioni Costalpino, Isola d'Arbia, Taverne d'Arbia, San Miniato, Vignano, Ruffolo
Government
 - Mayor Maurizio Cenni (Democratic Party)
Area
 - Total 118 km2 (45.6 sq mi)
Elevation 322 m (1,056 ft)
Population (30 April 2008)
 - Total 54,066
 Density 458.2/km2 (1,186.7/sq mi)
 - Demonym Sienese
Time zone CET (UTC+1)
 - Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)
Postal code 53100, 53010
Dialing code 0577
Patron saint St. Ansanus
Saint day 1 December
Website Official website
Historic Centre of Siena*
UNESCO World Heritage Site

State Party  Italy
Type Cultural
Criteria i, ii, iv
Reference 717
Region** Europe and North America
Inscription history
Inscription 1995  (19th Session)
* Name as inscribed on World Heritage List.
** Region as classified by UNESCO.

Siena About this sound listen (Italian pronunciation: [ˈsjɛ(ː)na]; also widely spelled Sienna in English) is a city in Tuscany, Italy. It is the capital of the province of Siena.

The historic centre of Siena has been declared by UNESCO a World Heritage Site. It is one of the nation's most visited tourist attractions, with over 169,000 international arrivals in 2008.[1] Siena is famous for its cuisine, art, museums, medieval cityscape and palio.

Contents

History

Siena, like other Tuscan hill towns, was first settled in the time of the Etruscans (c. 900 BC to 400 BC) when it was inhabited by a tribe called the Saina. The Etruscans were an advanced people who changed the face of central Italy through their use of irrigation to reclaim previously unfarmable land, and their custom of building their settlements in well-defended hill-forts. A Roman town called Saena Julia was founded at the site in the time of the Emperor Augustus. The first document mentioning it dates from AD 70. Some archaeologists assert it was controlled for a period by a Gaulish tribe called the Saenones.

The Roman origin accounts for the town's emblem; a she-wolf suckling the infants Romulus and Remus. According to legend, Siena was founded by Senius, son of Remus, who was in turn the brother of Romulus, after whom Rome was named. Statues and other artwork depicting a she-wolf suckling the young twins Romulus and Remus can be seen all over the city of Siena. Other etymologies derive the name from the Etruscan family name "Saina", the Roman family name of the "Saenii", or the Latin word "senex" ("old") or the derived form "seneo", "to be old".

Siena did not prosper under Roman rule. It was not sited near any major roads and lacked opportunities for trade. Its insular status meant that Christianity did not penetrate until the fourth century AD, and it was not until the Lombards invaded Siena and the surrounding territory that it knew prosperity. After the Lombard occupation the old Roman roads of Aurelia and the Cassia passed through areas exposed to Byzantine raids, so the Lombards rerouted much of their trade between the Lombards' northern possessions and Rome along a more secure road through Siena. Siena prospered as a trading post, and the constant streams of pilgrims passing to and from Rome were provided a valuable source of income in the centuries to come.

The oldest aristocratic families in Siena date their line to the Lombards' surrender in 774 to Charlemagne. At this point the city was inundated with a swarm of Frankish overseers who married into the existing Sienese nobility, and left a legacy that can be seen in the abbeys they founded throughout Sienese territory. Feudal power waned however, and by the death of Countess Matilda in 1115 the border territory of the Mark of Tuscia which had been under the control of her family, the Canossa, broke up into several autonomous regions.

Siena prospered as a city-state, becoming a major centre of money lending and an important player in the wool trade. It was governed at first directly by its bishop, but episcopal power declined during the 1100s. The bishop was forced to concede a greater say in the running of the city to the nobility in exchange for their help during a territorial dispute with Arezzo, and this started a process which culminated in 1167 when the commune of Siena declared its independence from episcopal control. By 1179, it had a written constitution.

This period was also crucial in shaping the Siena we know today. It was during the early 1200s that the majority of the construction of the Siena Cathedral (Duomo) was completed. It was also during this period that the Piazza del Campo, now regarded as one of the most beautiful civic spaces in Europe, grew in importance as the centre of secular life. New streets were constructed leading to it and it served as the site of the market, and the location of various sporting events (perhaps better thought of as riots, in the fashion of the Florentine football matches that are still practised to this day). A wall was constructed in 1194 at the current site of the Palazzo Pubblico to stop soil erosion, an indication of how important the area was becoming as a civic space.

Medieval coin from Siena (12th century).

In the early 12th century a self-governing commune replaced the earlier aristocratic government. The consuls who governed the republic slowly became more inclusive of the poblani, or common people, and the commune increased its territory as the surrounding feudal nobles in their fortified castles submitted to the urban power. Siena's republic, struggling internally between nobles and the popular party, usually worked in political opposition to its great rival, Florence, and was in the 13th century predominantly Ghibelline in opposition to Florence's Guelph position (this conflict formed the backdrop for some of Dante's Commedia).

On 4 September 1260 the Sienese Ghibellines, supported by the forces of King Manfred of Sicily, defeated the Florentine Guelphs in the Battle of Montaperti. Before the battle, the Sienese army of around 20,000 faced a much larger Florentine army of around 33,000. Prior to the battle, the entire city was dedicated to the Virgin Mary (this was done several times in the city's history, most recently in 1944 to guard the city from Allied bombs). The man given command of Siena for the duration of the war, Bonaguida Lucari, walked barefoot and bareheaded, a halter around his neck, to the Duomo. Leading a procession composed of all the city's residents, he was met by all the clergy. Lucari and the bishop embraced, to show the unity of church and state, then Luceri formally gave the city and contrade to the Virgin. Legend has it that a thick white cloud descended on the battlefield, giving the Sienese cover and aiding their attack. The reality was that the Florentine army launched several fruitless attacks against the Sienese army during the day, then when the Sienese army countered with their own offensive, traitors within the Florentine army killed the standard bearer and in the resulting chaos, the Florentine army broke up and fled the battlefield. Almost half the Florentine army (some 15,000 men) were killed as a result. So crushing was the defeat that even today if the two cities meet in any sporting event, the Sienese supporters are likely to exhort their Florentine counterparts to “Remember Montaperti!”.

The historic centre dominated by the Duomo

The limits on the Roman town, were the earliest known walls to the city. During the tenth and 11th centuries, the town grew to the east and later to the north, in what is now the Camollia district. Walls were built to totally surround the city, and a second set was finished by the end of the 13th century. Much of these walls still exist today.[2] 

Siena's university, founded in 1240 and famed for its faculties of law and medicine, is still among the most important Italian universities. Siena rivalled Florence in the arts throughout the 13th and 14th centuries: the important late medieval painter Duccio di Buoninsegna (1253–1319) was a Sienese, but worked across the peninsula, and the mural of "Good Government" by Ambrogio Lorenzetti in the Palazzo Pubblico, or town hall, is a magnificent example of late-Medieval/early Renaissance art as well as a representation of the utopia of urban society as conceived during that period. Siena was devastated by the Black Death of 1348, and also suffered from ill-fated financial enterprises. In 1355, with the arrival of Charles IV of Luxembourg in the city, the population rose and suppressed the government of the Nove (Nine), establishing that Dodici (Twelve) nobles assisted by a council with a popular majority. This was also short-lived, being replaced by the Quindici (Fifteen) reformers in 1385, the Dieci (Ten, 1386–1387), Undici (Eleven, 1388–1398) and Twelve Priors (1398–1399) who, in the end, gave the city's seigniory to Gian Galeazzo Visconti of Milan in order to defend it from the Florentine expansionism.

In 1404 the Visconti were expelled and a government of Ten Priors established, in alliance with Florence against King Ladislas of Naples. With the election of the Sienese Pius II as Pope, the Piccolomini and other noble families were allowed to return to the government, but after his death the control returned into popular hands. In 1472 the Republic founded the Monte dei Paschi, a bank that is still active today and is the oldest surviving bank in the world. The noble factions returned in the city under Pandolfo Petrucci in 1487, with the support of Florence and of Alfonso of Calabria; Petrucci exerted an effective rule on the city until his death in 1512, favouring arts and sciences, and defending it from Cesare Borgia. Pandolfo was succeeded by his son Borghese, who was ousted by his cousin Raffaello, helped by the Medici Pope Leo X. The last Petrucci was Fabio, exiled in 1523 by the Sienese people. Internal strife resumed, with the popular faction ousting the Noveschi party supported by Clement VII: the latter sent an army, but was defeated at Camollia in 1526. Emperor Charles V took advantage of the chaotic situation to put a Spanish garrison in Siena. The citizens expelled it in 1552, allying with France: this was unacceptable for Charles, who sent his general Gian Giacomo Medici to lay siege to it with a Florentine-Imperial army.

The Sienese government entrusted its defence to Piero Strozzi. When the latter was defeated at the Battle of Marciano (August 1554), any hope of relief was lost. After 18 months of resistance, it surrendered to Florence on 17 April 1555, marking the end of the Republic of Siena. The new Spanish King Philip, owing huge sums to the Medici, ceded it (apart a series of coastal fortress annexed to the State of Presidi) to the Grand Duchy of Tuscany, to which it belonged until the unification of Italy in the 19th century. A Republican government of 700 Sienese families in Montalcino resisted until 1559.

The picturesque city remains an important cultural centre, especially for humanist disciplines.

The Piazza Del Campo
Il Campo from Torre del Mangia.
Façade of the Palazzo Pubblico (Town Hall) during the Palio days
Piazza Salimbeni
Church of San Domenico
Panorama of The Cathedral of Siena

Culture

Siena retains a ward-centric culture from medieval times. Each ward (contrada) is represented by an animal or mascot, and has its own boundary and distinct identity. Ward rivalries are most rampant during the annual horse race (Palio) in the Piazza del Campo.[3]

Main sights

Siena's cathedral, the Duomo, begun in the twelfth century, is one of the great examples of Italian romanesque architecture. Its main façade was completed in 1380. It is unusual for a Christian cathedral in that its axis runs north-south. This is because it was originally intended to be the largest cathedral in existence, with a north-south transept and an east-west aisle, as is usual. After the completion of the transept and the building of the east wall (which still exists and may be climbed by the public via an internal staircase) the money ran out and the rest of the cathedral was abandoned.

Inside is the famous Gothic octagonal pulpit by Nicola Pisano (1266–1268) supported on lions, and the labyrinth inlaid in the flooring, traversed by penitents on their knees. Within the Sacristy are some perfectly preserved renaissance frescos by Ghirlandaio, and, beneath the Duomo, in the baptistry is the baptismal font with bas-reliefs by Donatello, Ghiberti, Jacopo della Quercia and other 15th century sculptors. The Museo dell'Opera del Duomo contains Duccio's famous Maestà (1308–1311) and various other works by Sienese masters. More Sienese paintings are to be found in the Pinacoteca.

The shell-shaped Piazza del Campo, the town square, which houses the Palazzo Pubblico and the Torre del Mangia, is another architectural treasure, and is famous for hosting the Palio horse race. The Palazzo Pubblico, itself a great work of architecture, houses yet another important art museum. Included within the museum is Ambrogio Lorenzetti's series of frescos on the good government and the results of good and bad government and also some of the finest frescoes of Simone Martini and Pietro Lorenzetti.

On the Piazza Salimbeni is the Palazzo Salimbeni, a notable building and also the medieval headquarters of Monte dei Paschi di Siena, one of the oldest banks in continuous existence and a major player in the Sienese economy.

Housed in the notable Gothic Palazzo Chigi on Via di Città is the Accademia Musicale Chigiana, Siena's conservatory of music.

Other churches in the city include:

The city's gardens include the Orto Botanico dell'Università di Siena, a botanical garden maintained by the University of Siena.

The Medicean Fortress houses the Enoteca Italiana and the Siena Jazz School, with courses and concerts all the year long and a major festival during the International Siena Jazz Masterclasses. Over two weeks more than 30 concerts and jam sessions are held in the two major town squares, on the terrace in front of the Enoteca, in the gardens of the Contrade clubs, and in numerous historical towns and villages of the Siena province. Siena is also home of Sessione Senese per la Musica e l'Arte (SSMA), a summer music program for musicians, is a fun/learning musical summer experience.

In the neighbourhood are numerous patrician villa, numerous of which attributed to Baldassarre Peruzzi:

  • Villa Chigi
  • Castle of Belcaro
  • Villa Celsa
  • Villa Cetinale
  • Villa Volte Alte

Economy

The main activities are tourism, services, agriculture, handicrafts and light industry.

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Primary (agriculture)

Agriculture counts 919 companies with a total area of 10,755 kilometers2 for a UAA (usable agricultural area) of 6954 kilometers2 or about 1 / 30 of the total municipal area (data ISTAT for the 2000 Agriculture Census V).

Secondary (industry and manufacturing)

The industry sector of the Sienese economy is not very developed, but there are some important manufacturing centres and enterprises.

The Centenary Institute Sieroterapico Achille Sclavo, now American-owned and under other brand, (Novartis Vaccines) produces vaccines and employs about a thousand people. It is the industry leader in a series of small activities related to the pharmaceutical industry: strumentistica, services, special transports.

Parallel is under development industry Biotechnology, supported by joint ventures between the public and private sectors. This is strongly supporting and developing scientific research in both the industries and activities that in private (see below).

The confectionery industry is one of the most important of the traditional sectors of the secondary industry, because of the many local specialties. Among the many, particularly known and appreciated are the typical Ricciarelli biscuits typical pasta of almonds the well-known gingerbread, and thehorses. Noto is also thegingerbread, a sweet made of honey, almonds and pepper, spread in an area ranging between Tuscany and Umbria. All are marketed both industrial and artisan bakeries in different cities.

Other seasonal specialties are the chestnut and the pan de 'Saints'(or Pan co' Santi) traditionally prepared in the weeks preceding the festival of Saints, the November 1.

Another area that has a long tradition of manufacturing industry, which is about six hundred people.

Tertiary (services, finance and commerce)

In this area, the most important financial tivities are those related to the bank Monte dei Paschi di Siena.

There are also important appearances of the University and the Hospital, which employ thousands of people and serves a catchment area much wider than the already large territory province. Their presence is also important from the standpoint of scientific and medical research. In the territory there is a dense network of micro-enterprises (less than ten thousand) active in trade and tourism.

"Siena city of the wires"

Siena was wired with fiber optic in the last ten years. Interested as the first city in Italy to the Socrates Project(Progietto Socrate) of Telecom, the wiring can receive, in the houses of the township, the television signal via cable. The wiring, built by private companies in partnership with the city, helped to create a civic public station (Channel Civic Senese) cable that transmits only relevant information and local news and gives you access to Internet to broadband in every home. In 2007, however, the station was privatized, separating the tv from the internet. The wiring is currently extending to major centers of the province through another company set up ad hoc (earth cable).

Tourism

Tourism is certainly a big demand, given the fame of Siena and the number of tourists that this attracts. The vision of Siena as a city-museum limits the presence in day-trips. Only in recent years is trying to build a series of continuous efforts in order to attract a more steady and with periods of stay beyond the hours. Tourism promotion is entrusted to an agency for tourism, Apt of Siena, jurisdiction over the province except the Val di Chiana (entrusted to APT Chianciano Terme).

Arts and crafts

The craft keeps the character of "workshop" or a family business. Besides the classic activities necessary for every city, we signal those related to the restoration and the arts "major" restorers, decorators, carpenters specializing in antique furniture.

In the continuation of ancient tradition, still exist in Siena arts and crafts village considered anachronistic "sequins" (polished furniture, especially old), painter of icons, copiers of old paintings and embroidery in style Senese (Sienese with classic themes such as deer present in the decorative floor of the Duomo).

It must be said that the boundaries of those minor arts are often blurred and many artisans ranging in multiple fields or some artists "more" does not disdain the pursuit of smaller crafts.

Quaternary (R&D)

There's a few years increased attention to biotechnology and research related to that part of a local bank (see below) which is funding and supporting businesses to pure research and services in the "startup" "for the creation of new activities in the field".

The creation of an infrastructure network is seeking to develop a highly skilled and competitive, integrated in an "ecological" in an area known for natural and man-made landscape. It is therefore trying to address a new town development towards "sustainable". public investment, since the 2000s, have been focused on the Siena Biotech, a company created with the function of creating a local fly in this area and led to tow a small business more or less instrumental. Not secondary, in this context, the importance of the pharmaceutical industry spent on earth of Siena, in particular related to the name of Achille Sclavo and the Institute Sieroterapico who later took the name, found at the end of the twentieth century by the group Marcucci, then by Chiron and then by the multinational Novartis, which still keeps you a major production plant specialized in the production of vaccines.

Sports

Siena has enjoyed a long tradition in sports. Basketball and football are perhaps the most popular in Siena. However, other sports such as rugby union and track-and-field are also widely practised.

Professional sports

The 'Calcio' (soccer) Association of Siena was founded in 1904 and fully established in 1908. It has participated in the National Championship of Soccer in Seria "A" (The highest level of the Italian soccer leagues) since the 2003–2004 season. The football club A.C. Siena hosts its games at the Stadio Artemio Franchi.

The premier society of men's basketball in Siena is called Mens Sana Basket (also referred to by its sponsored name of Montepaschi Siena). It is also the oldest sports society in Siena. Mens Sana Basket participates in the highest level of play in Italy, Lega Basket Serie A, and it won the national championship in the 2003–04, 2006–07, 2007–08 and 2008-09 seasons. The team host their home games at Palasport Mens Sana indoor arena.

Amateur sports

As with most of Italy, football is very popular, and numerous amateur football teams have been formed. Tournaments for amateur football leagues are carried out during the winter. Contrary to the rest of Italy, Siena is home to several amateur basketball teams. These teams exist to "seed" the professional teams. In addition to Mens Sana Basket, other teams (amateur) exist including "l'Associazione Sportiva Costone Basket" and "La Virtus Siena".

There exist several female University sports teams organized under the CUS (Centro Universitario Sportivo.) These include such sports as fencing, volleyball and rugby.

The Palio

The Palio di Siena is a traditional medieval horse race run around the Piazza del Campo twice each year, on 2 July and 16 August. The event is attended by large crowds, and is widely televised. Seventeen Contrade (which are city neighbourhoods originally formed as battalions for the city's defence) vie for the trophy: a painted banner, or Palio bearing an image of the Blessed Virgin Mary. For each race a new Palio is commissioned by well-known artists and Palios won over many years can often be seen in the local Contrade museum. During each Palio period, the city is decked out in lamps and flags bearing the Contrade colours.

Ten of the seventeen Contrade run in each Palio: seven run by right (having not run in the previous year's corresponding Palio) together with three drawn by lot from the remaining ten. A horse is assigned to each by lot and is then guarded and cared for in the Contrade stable. The jockeys are paid huge sums and indeed there are often deals and bribes between jockeys or between 'allied' Contrade committees to hinder other riders, especially those of 'enemy' Contrade. For the three days preceding the Palio itself, there are practice races. The horses are led from their stables through the city streets to the Campo, accompanied by crowds wearing Contrade scarves or tee-shirts and the air is filled with much singing and shouting.

Though often a brutal and dangerous competition for horse and bare-back rider alike, the city thrives on the pride this competition brings. The Palio is not simply a tourist event as a true Sienese regards this in an almost tribal way, with passions and rivalry similar to that found at a Soccer 'Derby' match. In fact the Sienese are baptised twice, once in church and a second time in their own Contrade fountain. This loyalty is maintained through a Contrade 'social club' and regular events and charitable works. Indeed the night before the Palio the city is a mass of closed roads as each Contrade organises its own outdoor banquet, often for numbers in excess of 1000 diners. On the day of the Palio itself the horses are accompanied by drummers and flag twirlers dressed in medieval costumes who first lead the horse and jockey to the Contrade parish church and then join a procession around the Campo square. There are often long delays while the race marshall attempts to line up the horses, but once underway the Campo becomes a cauldron of wild emotion for the 3 minutes of the race.

This event is not without its controversy however, and recently, there have been complaints about the treatment of the horses and to the danger run by the riders. In order to better protect the horses, steps have been taken to make veterinary care more easily available during the main race. Also at the most dangerous corners of the course, cushions are used to help protect both the riders and horses.

Transport

The nearest international airports to Siena are Peretola Airport in Florence and Galileo Galilei International Airport in Pisa.

Siena can be reached by train from both Pisa and Florence, changing at Empoli. Siena's train station is located at the bottom of a long hill outside the city walls, and travellers with luggage should look for a taxi or bus (from the stop opposite the station).

Buses leave from Piazza Gramsci, located within the city walls. Buses are available directly to and from Florence, a one hour trip, as well as from Rome (three hours), Milan (four and a half hours), and from various other towns in Tuscany and beyond.

By road, Siena is linked to Florence by a "superstrada" (the Raccordo Autostradale RA03 – Siena-Firenze), a form of toll free autostrada, albeit with narrower lanes, with a less well maintained surface and sharper bends. The superstrada to Florence is indicated on some road signs with the letters SI-FI, recalling the pre-1994 license-plate designations. A continuation of the same four lane road to the south east is under construction and will when completed facilitate the drive towards Perugia and Rome. However, drivers should be aware that almost no traffic is permitted within the city centre. Several large carparks are located immediately outside the city walls. The "La Fortezza" car park is closest to the centre, and is free of charge. Commercial traffic is permitted within the city only during the morning hours, while in the afternoon pedestrians dominate.

Art in Siena

See also: Art at the Pinacoteca of Siena

Over the centuries, Siena has had a rich tradition of arts and artists. The list of artists from the Sienese School include Duccio, and his student Simone Martini, Pietro Lorenzetti and Martino di Bartolomeo. A number of well known works of Renaissance and High Renaissance art still remain in Siena galleries or decorate churches in Siena.

The Church of San Domenico in Siena contains art by Guido da Siena, dating to mid 13th century.

Duccio's Maesta which was commissioned by the City of Siena in 1308 was instrumental in leading Italian painting away from the hieratic representations of Byzantine art and directing it towards more direct presentations of reality. And his Madonna and Child with saints polyptych, painted between 1311 and 1318 remains at the Pinacoteca Nazionale in Siena.

The Pinacoteca also includes several works by Domenico Beccafumi, as well as art by Lorenzo Lotto, Domenico di Bartolo and Fra Bartolomeo.

Twin towns — Sister cities

Siena is twinned with:

Gallery of art in Siena

References

Bibliography
Notes
  1. ^ http://www.euromonitor.com/_Euromonitor_Internationals_Top_City_Destinations_Ranking
  2. ^ name=Mcintyre
  3. ^ Huppert, George. After the Black Death: A Social History of Early Modern Europe. Second Edition. Indiana University Press. 1998. 36.

External links



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