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Resident Evil 2
Resident Evil 2.jpg
PAL PlayStation boxart
Developer(s) Capcom Production Studio 4
Angel Studios (N64 port)
Publisher(s) Capcom
Virgin Interactive (Europe and PC version)
Nintendo Australia (N64 and GameCube)
Director(s) Hideki Kamiya
Producer(s) Shinji Mikami
Writer(s) Noboru Sugimura
Composer(s) Masami Ueda
Shusaku Uchiyama
Shun Nishigaki
Series Resident Evil
Platform(s) PlayStation, Game.com, Microsoft Windows, Nintendo 64, Dreamcast, Nintendo GameCube, PlayStation Network
Release date(s)
Genre(s) Survival horror
Mode(s) Single-player
Rating(s) BBFC: 15
CERO: 15+
ELSPA: 15+
ESRB: M
Media PS, PC: CD-ROM
N64: 512-megabit cartridge
DC: GD-ROM
GC: Nintendo disc
PC: DVD
Input methods Gamepad, Keyboard

Resident Evil 2, known in Japan as Biohazard 2 (バイオハザード2?), is a survival horror video game by Capcom originally released for the PlayStation in 1998. It is the second installment in the Resident Evil series, and was later ported to Microsoft Windows, Nintendo 64, Dreamcast, Nintendo GameCube, and Game.com.

Contents

Gameplay

Resident Evil 2 follows the same gameplay mechanics as its predecessor. The game's graphics are composed of polygonal character models, and items superimposed over pre-rendered graphics, using fixed camera angles. The player must travel through a variety of locations, solving puzzles and fighting numerous mutated creatures in order to complete the game. The player can arm themselves with a variety of firearms, although ammunition is limited. The game features an improved graphics engine over the previous game, allowing for more zombies to appear on screen. In addition, the player can now determine their character's health based on their animation. A character in the 'caution' stage of injury will cover their stomach with his or her hand, while a character on the verge of death will limp. The game over screens are more gruesome this time, featuring the player's character being eaten by the creature that killed him or her.

The main addition to the gameplay is a scenario system. Resident Evil 2 offers two playable characters, each with their own scenario. However, after finishing one character's scenario (the "A" game) and saving the data, a second scenario (the "B" game) is unlocked in which the same series of events are depicted from the other character's perspective. Actions taken by the player during the first scenario affects the player's surroundings during the second scenario. In addition, one's character also has access to one area in their B game that they normally would not have access to. There are two scenarios for each character.

The player is awarded with unlockable weapons and other bonuses after completing a scenario and fulfilling certain requirements. A ranking system has been implemented in which the player is graded based on the amount of time taken to complete the game, number of times the game was saved and the number of first-aid sprays used. Several hidden minigames can also be unlocked as well such as The 4th Survivor, its spoof/harder version The Tofu Survivor and in the DualShock Version, an Extreme Battle minigame.

Plot

The game begins on September 29, 1998, as the citizens of Raccoon City have been turned into zombies by a biological weapon known as the T-virus.[1]

Leon S. Kennedy, a police officer on his first day in the Raccoon Police Department, and Claire Redfield, a college student looking for her brother, enter the city. They fight their way to the police station. There they find Ada Wong and a little girl named Sherry Birkin.

They learn that Claire's brother, Chris Redfield, has gone to Europe to stop Umbrella's experiments. They escape the station through the sewers and find Annette Birkin, Sherry's mother. They learn that the viral outbreak was accidental, that her husband William Birkin has turned into a monster who plans to infect Sherry with the G-virus and that Ada is a spy. They fight their way to Umbrella's underground laboratory where the T- and G-viruses are being produced. On the way to the labs, William Birkin infects Sherry.

Claire continues into the laboratory to find the cure. Annette tries to kill Claire, thinking she wanted the G-virus, but is killed by her husband. As she dies, Annette tells Claire how to prepare the cure for Sherry. Leon and Ada face the T-103 and Ada apparently dies.

When the laboratory self-destruct is activated, Claire tells Leon to get Sherry and go to the train, which will take them out of the underground laboratory, while she prepares the cure. The three escape the self-destructing laboratory. Claire injects Sherry with the cure and Birkin reappears, now a massive blob as a result of the G-virus mutation, making one final attack. The self-destruct mechanism activates on the train, and they escape as the train explodes, killing Birkin.[2]

Development

Resident Evil 2 began development in mid-1996, shortly after the release of the first game; however, as Resident Evil 2 was approaching its release date, Capcom dropped the project and started again. This scrapped version was later dubbed Resident Evil 1.5. This prototype version starred Leon S. Kennedy and an early version of the Claire Redfield character, named Elza Walker. Other supporting characters from the released game also appeared in Resident Evil 1.5. The game was 65%-80% complete before Capcom decided to stop the development.[3][4]

Resident Evil 2 was preceded by a demo version that was bundled with Resident Evil: Director's Cut.

Release history

Regional differences

In Japan, where Resident Evil 2 was titled Biohazard 2, the game was released a week after the North American release. The game was made easier for the Japanese market with changes in item and enemy placement, increased firepower for weapons and the auto-aiming feature turned on by default.[citation needed]

In addition, the game over scenes are less violent and edited in the Japanese version, as zombies and other creatures do not devour or eviscerate the player's character on-screen like they do in the North American and PAL versions.

DualShock Version

Several months after the original release, a second version of Resident Evil 2 was released known as the DualShock Version. As the title suggests, the game was modified to incorporate support for the vibration function and analog control of the PlayStation DualShock controller. The main addition is a new unlockable minigame, Extreme Battle. The objective is to reach the police station from the underground laboratory and retrieve four anti-biohazard bombs located throughout the station. There are four playable characters and three difficulty settings. The Extreme Battle became a standard feature for subsequent versions of the game.

There are also some minor additions, such as ranking screens for the Hunk and Tofu minigames, a Rookie difficulty setting for the main game, as well as a "USA version" mode in the Japanese version, based on the North American version's default setting and a new cheat code that grants the player unlimited ammo for all weapons.

Other platforms

Like the original game, Resident Evil 2 was released on other platforms after its initial success on the PlayStation. The first of these ports was a PC version titled Resident Evil 2 Platinum in 1999. It features all the additions from the Dual Shock Version and added a new gallery mode featuring illustrations, renders and in-game character models, as well as a new Hard difficulty setting for the main game. The Dreamcast version, released the same year, features these additions, along with the added benefit of viewing the character's health in a VMU. In Japan, the Dreamcast version (where it was titled Biohazard 2 Value Plus) was bundled with an extra disc which featured a demo of Resident Evil Code: Veronica and also contained assorted music from several Resident Evil soundtracks released in Japan.

A Nintendo 64 version was also released in 1999, ported by Angel Studios (currently Rockstar San Diego). While it was the only port of the game that did not feature the Extreme Battle mode, it did contain some console-exclusive features. The most prominent was a series of additional in-game documents known as the "EX Files" that connected the plot of the game with the other games in the series (including the then-unreleased Resident Evil Zero). Other features include an item randomizer, violence control, first-person controls and new unlockable outfits replacing the ones from the previous versions. A Hunter from the first Resident Evil is also given a cameo appearance, albeit dead. The game supports the Rumble Pak and Expansion Pak. The N64 version is notable due to the compression techniques that the developers were forced to use in order to fit two CD-ROMs worth of data onto a single 64MB cartridge. It also featured, for the time, a high resolution display of 640x480 compared to the PS1 version's 320x240. The game changes the resolution at each camera cut based on the number of enemies in the room. Many enemies take more processing power, so the game chooses lower resolutions. When all the enemies are defeated, it runs again at 640x480. The N64 version also features surround sound, not found on the PS1 version, using the Mosys system from Factor 5.

The Nintendo GameCube version, released in 2003, is identical to the PlayStation's DualShock Version in terms of content, featuring only a minimal set of improvements such as skippable cut scenes and a higher frame rate for the game's FMV sequences.

An LCD game based on Resident Evil 2 was also released for the short-lived game.com in late 1998. Two versions of the game.com game were scheduled to be released, one starring Leon and the other with Claire, but only the former saw release. An aborted port for the Sega Saturn was also planned, but was canceled when the development team decided on working a new game in the series (Resident Evil Code: Veronica) for the Dreamcast instead.[5]

In 2006, it was re-released on the PC platform in Japan by Sourcenext, with full Windows XP support.

In 2007, it was released on the PlayStation Network in Japan for the PlayStation 3 and PlayStation Portable. The game was released on the PlayStation Network in North America on November 19, 2009.

Music

The Biohazard 2 Original Soundtrack is the original soundtrack CD for Resident Evil 2, and was composed by Masami Ueda, Shusaku Uchiyama, and Shun Nishigaki. It does not contain every track written for the game however. Most of the remaining tracks were included in the subsequent release of the Biohazard 2 Complete Track album on August 21, 1998.

Reception

 Reception
Aggregate scores
Aggregator Score
GameRankings PS: 92% (26 reviews)[6]
N64: 87% (20 reviews)[7]
DC: 81% (17 reviews)[8]
PC: 80% (18 reviews)[9]
GC: 64% (24 reviews)[10]
Metacritic PS & N64: 89% (13 reviews for PS, 12 reviews for N64)[11][12]
DC: 77% (11 reviews)[13]
GC: 59% (15 reviews)[14]
Review scores
Publication Score
1UP.com GC: C[15]
Allgame PS & N644/5 stars[16]
DC: 3.5/5 stars[17]
GC & GCOM: 2.5/5 stars[18]
Computer and Video Games PS: 9.0 out of 10[19]
DC: 7.0 out of 10[20]
Eurogamer GC: 4 out of 10[21]
Famitsu GC: 32 out of 40[22]
Game Informer DC & GC: 8 out of 10[23][24]
GamePro PS: 4.5/5 stars (DualShock);[25]
5/5 stars (Original)[26]
N64: 4.5/5 stars[27]
DC: 4/5 stars[28]
GC: 3.5/5 stars[29]
Game Revolution PS: A-[30]
DC: C+[31]
GameSpot PS and N64: 8.9 out of 10[32][33]
DC: 7.9 out of 10[34]
PC: 7.0 out of 10[35]
GC: 5.0 out of 10[36]
GameSpy GC: 2/5 stars[37]
IGN PS: 9.3 out of 10[38]
N64: 9.1 out of 10[39]
DC: 8.5 out of 10[40]
PC: 6.8 out of 10[41]
GC: 5 out of 10[42]
PC Zone 9.0 out of 10[43]

Resident Evil 2 received positive reviews from most publications. Resident Evil 2 was a commercial success and it has sold over 4.96 million copies since its release, making it the best selling game in the series until it was surpassed in sales by Resident Evil 5 in 2009.[44] Game Revolution called it "a great game with good graphics, terrific sound, riveting action, and puzzles that will keep you entertained for hours".[30]

GamePro said "For staunch veterans of the series, RE2 Dual Shock demands at least a rental...for newcomers to the series, there's never been a better time to get scared".[25] Games Domain said "Had the game lasted a little longer, and if the monsters had been a little more creative, this would be one of the best games ever made for the PSX".[45] GameSpot criticised the puzzles for being "a little out of place", and the inventory system for making players "mindlessly keep bringing items to and retrieving them from these "magical" storage bins", but concluded "Resident Evil 2 is one of the most entertaining games I've ever played".[32]

IGN criticized the aiming, camera angles, puzzles and inventory system, while praising the atmosphere, graphics, sound and design, calling Resident Evil 2 "a good sequel...a superb game in it's [sic] own right and it will consume your life for hours, but it's not a quantum leap forward in the evolution of the game or the genre".[38]

Resident Evil 2 has an average of 89 out of 100 for the PlayStation and Nintendo 64 versions,[11][12] 77 out of 100 for the Dreamcast version,[13] and 59 out of 100 for the Nintendo GameCube version[14] on Metacritic.

Novelization

A novelization of the game titled Resident Evil: City of the Dead was written by author S.D. Perry, as the third book in her series of Resident Evil novels.[citation needed]

References

  1. ^ http://psx.ign.com/articles/150/150504p1.html
  2. ^ http://stars.ign.com/articles/961/961553p7.html
  3. ^ http://www.pc-boost.com/actualite-1235735898-3-Resident-Evil-15,-une-des-versions-annulee-du-jeu-de-la-serie.html
  4. ^ http://www.survivhor.com/RE1.5/TEXTES/03/index.html
  5. ^ "RE2 for Saturn Canceled - News at GameSpot". http://www.gamespot.com/news/2465273.html. 
  6. ^ "Resident Evil 2 Reviews (PlayStation)". GameRankings. Retrieved on 2009-01-28.
  7. ^ "Resident Evil 2 Reviews (N64)". GameRankings. Retrieved on 2009-01-28.
  8. ^ "Resident Evil 2 Reviews (DreamCast)". GameRankings. Retrieved on 2009-01-28.
  9. ^ "Resident Evil 2 Reviews (PC)". GameRankings. Retrieved on 2009-01-28.
  10. ^ "Resident Evil 2 Reviews (GameCube)". GameRankings. Retrieved on 2009-01-28
  11. ^ a b "Resident Evil 2 (psx: 1997): Reviews". http://www.metacritic.com/games/platforms/psx/residentevil2. 
  12. ^ a b "Resident Evil 2 (n64: 1999): Reviews". http://www.metacritic.com/games/platforms/n64/residentevil2. 
  13. ^ a b "Resident Evil 2 (drm: 2000): Reviews". http://www.metacritic.com/games/platforms/drm/residentevil2. 
  14. ^ a b "Resident Evil 2 (cube: 2003): Reviews". http://www.metacritic.com/games/platforms/cube/residentevil2. 
  15. ^ MacDonald, Mark. "Reviews: Resident Evil 2 for GameCube". 1UP. Retrieved on 2009-01-28.
  16. ^ Resident Evil 2 for PlayStation Overview, allgame. Retrieved on 2009-01-28.
  17. ^ Resident Evil 2 for Dreamcast Overview, allgame. Retrieved on 2009-01-28.
  18. ^ Resident Evil 2 for GameCube Overview, allgame. Retrieved on 2009-01-28.
  19. ^ Playstation Review: Resident Evil 2, Computer and Video Games, August 15, 2001. Retrieved on 2009-01-29.
  20. ^ Dreamcast Review: Resident Evil 2, Computer and Video Games, August 8, 2001. Retrieved on 2009-01-29.
  21. ^ Reed, Kristan (2003-06-09). "Resident Evil 2 and 3 Review". Eurogamer. Retrieved on 2009-01-28.
  22. ^ Biohazard (Resident Evil) 2 & 3 - Famitsu Scores Archive Retrieved on 2009-01-28.
  23. ^ "Resident Evil 2". Game Informer. January 2001. pp. 125. 
  24. ^ Mason, Lisa (April 2003). "Resident Evil 2". Game Informer. GameStop. http://www.gameinformer.com/Games/Review/200304/R03.0729.1558.54434.htm. Retrieved 2009-07-29. 
  25. ^ a b "Review : Resident Evil 2: Dual Shock Version - from GamePro.com". http://www.gamepro.com/article/reviews/295/resident-evil-2-dual-shock-version. 
  26. ^ Review: Resident Evil 2 (PlayStation), GamePro, April 21, 2006. Retrieved on 2009-01-28.
  27. ^ Review: Resident Evil 2 (N64), GamePro, November 24, 2000. Retrieved on 2009-01-28.
  28. ^ Review: Resident Evil 2 (Dreamcast), GamePro. Retrieved on 2009-01-28.
  29. ^ Review: Resident Evil 2 (GameCube), GamePro, April 2, 2003. Retrieved on 2009-01-28.
  30. ^ a b "Resident Evil 2 video game review for the PS". http://www.gamerevolution.com/review/sony/resident_evil_2. 
  31. ^ Resident Evil 2 video game review for the DREAMCAST. Retrieved on 2009-01-28.
  32. ^ a b "Resident Evil 2 review from GameSpot". http://web.archive.org/web/20010707141134/http://gamespot.com/gamespot/stories/reviews/0,10867,2549080,00.html. 
  33. ^ Resident Evil 2 for Nintendo 64 Review, GameSpot, November 19, 1999. Retrieved on 2009-01-29.
  34. ^ Resident Evil 2 for Dreamcast Review, GameSpot, January 28, 2000. Retrieved on 2009-01-29.
  35. ^ Resident Evil 2 for PC Review, GameSpot, March 26, 1999. Retrieved on 2009-01-29.
  36. ^ Resident Evil 2 for GameCube Review, GameSpot, January 21, 2003. Retrieved on 2009-01-29.
  37. ^ Resident Evil 2 Review (GameCube), GameSpy. Retrieved on 2009-01-29.
  38. ^ a b "Resident Evil 2 review from IGN". http://web.archive.org/web/19990429091320/http://psx.ign.com/reviews/504.html. 
  39. ^ Casamassina, Matt (1999-11-24). "Resident Evil 2 Review (N64)". IGN. Retrieved on 2009-01-29.
  40. ^ Langan, Matthew (2000-01-13). "Resident Evil (BioHazard 2) Review (Dreamcast)". IGN. Retrieved on 2009-01-29.
  41. ^ Blevins, Tal (1999-03-22). "Resident Evil 2 Platinum Review (PC)". IGN. Retrieved on 2009-01-29.
  42. ^ Casamassina, Matt (2003-01-29). "Resident Evil 2 Review (GameCube)". IGN. Retrieved on 2009-01-29.
  43. ^ PC Review: Resident Evil 2, PC Zone, August 13, 2001. Retrieved on 2009-01-29.
  44. ^ "Press Release". Capcom. http://ir.capcom.co.jp/english/news/html/e090601a.html. Retrieved 2009-06-02. 
  45. ^ "Resident Evil 2". http://web.archive.org/web/20020805051601/http://www.gamesdomain.com/playstation/reviews/Resident_Evil_2.html. 

External links


Strategy wiki

Up to date as of January 23, 2010

From StrategyWiki, the free strategy guide and walkthrough wiki

Resident Evil 2
Box artwork for Resident Evil 2.
Developer(s) Capcom
Nintendo 64
Angel Studios
Publisher(s) Capcom, Virgin Interactive
Designer(s) Hideki Kamiya
Release date(s)
PlayStation
 November 111998 (Dual Shock)
 August 61998 (Dual Shock)
Game.com
Windows
Nintendo 64
Sega Dreamcast
Nintendo GameCube
Genre(s) Survival horror
System(s) Windows, PlayStation, Nintendo 64, Sega Dreamcast, GameCube, Game.com
Players 1-2
Rating(s)
ESRB: Mature
BBFC: 15
Media 2 CD-ROMs (, )
Preceded by Resident Evil
Followed by Resident Evil 3: Nemesis
Series Resident Evil
Claire Redfield: the sister of Chris Redfield and female protagonist of RE2

Resident Evil 2 (called Biohazard 2 in Japan) is a survival horror video game released by Capcom on January 21, 1998 (in North America) for the PlayStation. It is the sequel to the highly popular Resident Evil and was later ported to Windows, Nintendo 64, Sega Dreamcast, GameCube, and Game.com (a Dual Shock version was also released for the PlayStation). The player still has the ability to play as two different characters (Leon S. Kennedy and Claire Redfield, who have two completely different scenarios). There is also another added scenario after the player has beaten the game with one character, which must be beaten in order to find the true ending of the game. There are, however, differences from the original: both characters have eight inventory slots each, as well as the ability to show physical damage (such as a character limping when hurt). The player can also quickly push away enemies when grabbed, leading to a much easier title than the first.

Originally Capcom showed the game at Tokyo Game Show 1996, which featured many differences from the current release. The game was supposed to have Leon S. Kennedy and Elza Walker, a college student and motorcyclist (who was eventually replaced by Claire Redfield) and take place in a larger urban setting. Capcom was nearly seventy percent through the development process, but scrapped the entire project in 1997 as they were dissatisfied with the game. They then began to re-work the game and Resident Evil 2 was released a year later.

The game takes place on September 29, 1998, two months and one day after the events in the original Resident Evil. Zombies have now made their way across Raccoon City, as the T-virus has been released in the sewer system and been digested by rats, which then spread the virus to the city's population, animals as well as humans. As the outbreak begins, two figures make their way into Raccoon City: Leon S. Kennedy, a rookie police officer on his first day, and Claire Redfield, a college student looking for her brother, Chris, of the S.T.A.R.S. unit. Leon and Claire quickly find themselves fighting for their lives against massive hordes of zombies in the search for a way out of city. But there's a creature much more powerful than a zombie lurking in the shadows, watching and waiting for the two survivors as they make their escape...

Table of Contents

Getting Started
Scenario A (Leon and Claire)
  1. Outskirts
  2. Police Station
  3. Sewers
  4. Factory
  5. Laboratory
Scenario B (Leon and Claire)
  1. Police Station
  2. Sewers
  3. Factory
  4. Laboratory
Appendices

Gaming

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From Wikia Gaming, your source for walkthroughs, games, guides, and more!

Resident Evil 2

Developer(s) Capcom
Publisher(s) Capcom
Release date 1998
Genre Survival Horror
Mode(s) single player
Age rating(s) ESRB: M
Platform(s) Nintendo 64, PlayStation, PC
Input controller
Credits | Soundtrack | Codes | Walkthrough


Resident Evil 2 is a game in the Resident Evil series. Following the same play mechanics as its predecessor, the game's graphics are composed of polygonal character models and items superimposed over pre-rendered graphics and fixed camera angles. The player must travel through a variety of locations, solving puzzles and fighting numerous mutated creatures in order to complete the game. The player's character can arm themselves with a variety of firearms (ammunition is limited). The game features an improved graphics engine over the previous game, allowing for more zombies to appear on-screen (up to seven at one point). In addition, the player can now determine their character's health based on their walking animation and body language. A character in the "caution" stage will cover his or her stomach with his or her hand, while a character on the verge of death will begin to limp. The game over screens are more gruesome this time, featuring the player's character being horribly mauled and killed by the creature that killed him or her, and three splats of blood splat onto the screen.

The main addition to the gameplay is a two-scenario system officially dubbed the "zapping system". As in the original Resident Evil, the game offers a selection of two playable characters, each with their own scenario. However, after finishing one character's scenario (referred as the "A" game) and saving the clear data, a second scenario (the "B" game) is unlocked in which the same series of events are depicted from the other characters perspective. Actions taken by the player during the first scenario affects the player's surroundings during the second scenario. In addition, one character also has access to one area in a B game that they normally wouldn't had access to in an A game. There's a total of four scenarios, two for each character.

Similarly to the original game, the player is awarded with unlockable weapons and other bonuses after completing a scenario under certain requirements. This time, a letter-based grading system has been implemented in which the player is graded based not only on the amount of time taken to complete one, but also on the number of times the game was saved and the number of first-aid sprays used by the player. Several hidden minigames can also be unlocked, these being The 4th Survivor, its spoof/harder version The Tofu Survivor and in some ports, a longer bonus minigame called Extreme Battle.

Cover Art

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Resident Evil series
Resident Evil Zero | Resident Evil | Resident Evil 2 | Resident Evil 3: Nemesis | Resident Evil Code: Veronica | Resident Evil 4 | Resident Evil: The Umbrella Chronicles | Resident Evil 5 | Resident Evil: The Darkside Chronicles
Spin-Offs
Outbreak series: Resident Evil Outbreak - Resident Evil Outbreak: File 2
Gun Survivor Series: Resident Evil: Survivor - Resident Evil Survivor 2 Code: Veronica - Resident Evil: Dead Aim| Resident Evil Gaiden | Residential Evil Confidential Report
Others
Resident Evil Gaiden - Residential Evil Confidential Report - Resident Evil: Genesis - Biohazard: The Episodes - Biohazard: The Missions - Biohazard: The Stories - Biohazard: The Operations
Updates:
Resident Evil: Director's Cut | Resident Evil Code: Veronica X | Resident Evil (Gamecube) | Resident Evil: Deadly Silence - Biohazard 4 Mobile Edition | Biohazard Pachislot
Books:
Zero Hour · The Umbrella Conspiracy · Caliban Cove · City of the Dead · Underworld · Nemesis · CODE: Veronica

Genesis • Apocalypse • Extinction
Rose Blank • Beast of the Northern Seas • To The Liberty • Comic • Fire & Ice

Films:
Resident Evil - Apocalypse - Extinction - Afterlife

This article uses material from the "Resident Evil 2" article on the Gaming wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.







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