Richmond, Fredericksburg and Potomac Railroad: Wikis

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Richmond, Fredericksburg and Potomac Railroad
Reporting mark RFP
Locale Virginia, United States
Dates of operation 1836–1991
Successor CSXT
Track gauge 4 ft 8+12 in (1,435 mm) (standard gauge)
Headquarters Richmond, VA

The Richmond, Fredericksburg, and Potomac Railroad (reporting mark RFP) was a railroad connecting Richmond, Virginia, to Washington, DC. It is now a portion of the CSX Transportation system.

The RF&P was a bridge line, with a slogan of "Linking North & South" (A bridge line has more traffic passing through its connections with other railroads than it originates or terminates at points along the line.), on a system that stretched about 113 miles. For the major portion of its existence, the RF&P connected with the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway, the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and Seaboard Air Line Railroad at Richmond. At Alexandria and through trackage rights to Union Station in Washington, DC, connections were made with the Pennsylvania Railroad, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad and the Southern Railway. There was a connection to the Washington and Old Dominion Railroad at Potomac Yard.

Contents

History

RF&P train starting out from Richmond, Virginia in 1865.

The Richmond, Fredericksburg and Potomac Railroad was chartered on February 25, 1834 to run from Richmond north via Fredericksburg to the Potomac River. It opened from Richmond to Hazel Run in 1836, to Fredericksburg on January 23, 1837 and the rest of the way to the Potomac River at Aquia Creek on September 30, 1842.

On September 30, 1852, an extension to the north opened. This split from the existing line at Brooke and ran north to Quantico, also on the Potomac. The old line to Aquia Creek became a branch.

On the other end of the line, the Alexandria and Washington Railroad was chartered on February 27, 1854 to build from the south end of the Long Bridge (14th Street Bridge) over the Potomac River south to Alexandria. That line opened in 1857. The railroad went bankrupt and was sold July 9, 1887, being reorganized November 23, 1887 as the Alexandria and Washington Railway. In 1873 the Baltimore and Potomac Railroad's branch over the Long Bridge opened, giving a route into Washington, D.C., over which the A&W obtained trackage rights.

The Alexandria and Fredericksburg Railway was chartered February 3, 1864 to continue the line from Alexandria to Fredericksburg. It opened on July 2, 1872, only reaching Quantico, the north end of the RF&P. At Quantico the 1.70-mile (2.7 km) Potomac Railroad, chartered April 21, 1867 and opened May 1, 1872, connected the two lines. It was leased to the RF&P for 28 years from May 17, 1877. On March 31, 1890, the two companies terminating in Alexandria merged to form the Washington Southern Railway. Until November 1, 1901 it was operated by the Baltimore and Potomac Railroad and its successor the Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington Railroad (part of the Pennsylvania Railroad system). The Potomac Railroad lease was transferred to the Washington Southern on June 30, 1904. On February 24, 1920 the Washington Southern was formally merged into the RF&P.

The Richmond-Washington Company was incorporated September 5, 1901 as a holding company, owning the entire capital stock of the two railroads. The stock of the company was owned equally by the Pennsylvania Railroad, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, Southern Railway, Seaboard Air Line Railway and Chesapeake and Ohio Railway. Four of these companies have since become part of CSX. The Southern Railway is now part of Norfolk Southern, and does not use the former RF&P; the former Pennsylvania Railroad has been split between CSX and Norfolk Southern.

From 1902 to 1908, major sections of the main line totalling 21 miles (34 km) were relocated.

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Company officers

Presidents of the Richmond, Fredericksburg and Potomac Railroad have included:

  • William White[1]
  • William T. Rice, 1955-1957.[2]
  • Stuart Shumate, 1961-1981.[3]

Branches

Richmond Connection

The Richmond, Fredericksburg and Potomac and Richmond and Petersburg Railroad Connection was chartered March 3, 1866 and opened May 1, 1867 as a connection between the RF&P and the Richmond and Petersburg Railroad (later part of the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad) west of downtown Richmond. It was operated jointly by those two companies. In addition, a downtown connection was owned by the R&P past Broad Street Station.

Louisa

The Louisa Railroad was chartered in 1836, running from the RF&P at Doswell west to Louisa. At first it was operated as a branch of the RF&P, but it was reorganized as the Virginia Central Railroad in 1850 and merged into the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad in 1868 as its oldest predecessor.

Rosslyn

The short branch from the north end to Rosslyn opened in 1896, and was sold to the Rosslyn Connecting Railroad in 1903, which was controlled by the Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington Railroad.

Station listing

Milepost City Station Opening date Connections and notes
CFP110.1 RO Interlocking north end of the RF&P at Potomac Yard, continues via trackage rights over Baltimore and Potomac Railroad (PRR) to Union Station in Washington, D.C.
junction with Rosslyn Connecting Railroad (PRR)
Crystal City Virginia Railway Express Fredericksburg Line and Manassas Line
CFP106.5 Slater's Lane junction with Norfolk Southern (SOU) branch to Mirant power plant and Robinson Terminal warehouse on the Alexandria waterfront. Defective equipment detector.
CFP105.3 Alexandria 1905 Virginia Railway Express Fredericksburg Line and Manassas Line
Amtrak Carolinian, Northeast Regional, Palmetto, Silver Meteor and Silver Star
CFP104.3 AF Interlocking junction with Orange and Alexandria Railroad (SOU)
CFP99.3 Franconia/Springfield Virginia Railway Express Fredericksburg Line
Amtrak NortheastRegional
CFP95.7 Newington
CFP92.5 Lorton Virginia Railway Express Fredericksburg Line
Amtrak Auto Train
junction with Lorton and Occoquan Railroad
CFP89.9 Colchester
CFP89.4 Woodbridge Virginia Railway Express Fredericksburg Line
Amtrak Northeast Regional
Rippon Virginia Railway Express Fredericksburg Line
CFP82.4 Cherry Hill
CFP78.8 Quantico Virginia Railway Express Fredericksburg Line
Amtrak Carolinian and Northeast Regional
Widewater
CFP68.1 Brooke Virginia Railway Express Fredericksburg Line
Leeland Virginia Railway Express Fredericksburg Line
CFP59.4 Fredericksburg 1910 Virginia Railway Express Fredericksburg Line
Amtrak Carolinian and Northeast Regional
junction with Virginia Central Railway
CFP51.5 Summit
CFP46.9 Guinea
CFP44.5 Woodford
Bowling Green Park
CFP37.8 Milford
CFP33 Penola
CFP27.1 Ruther Glen
CFP21.8 Doswell junction with Virginia Central Railroad (C&O)
CFP14.8 Ashland 1866 Amtrak Northeast Regional
CFP11.5 Elmont
CFP8.1 Glen Allen
CFP6.4 Laurel
Staples Mill Road 1975 Amtrak Carolinian, Palmetto, Northeast Regional, Silver Meteor and Silver Star
CFP1.7 AY Interlocking junction with Richmond, Fredericksburg and Potomac and Richmond and Petersburg Railroad Connection at Acca Yard
Richmond Broad Street Station 1917

External links

References

  1. ^ "The Jackson Shrine Along the RF&P". Bull Sheet Monthly News. October 1993. http://www.bullsheet.com/news/199310.html. Retrieved 2008-04-15.  
  2. ^ "William Thomas Rice Obituary Prepared by his Family". CSX Transportation. 2006-02-06. http://www.csx.com/?fuseaction=media.news_detail&i=48115. Retrieved 2008-04-15.  
  3. ^ "The Academy of Engineering Excellence" (PDF). Virginia Tech College of Engineering. http://www.eng.vt.edu/publications/acaengex_comp_2006.pdf. Retrieved 2008-04-15.  

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