Richmond-Petersburg: Wikis

Advertisements

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

(Redirected to Richmond–Petersburg article)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Counties of the Richmond Metropolitan Statistical Area
Roads, rivers, and cities of the center of the metropolitan area

The Greater Richmond Region (also known as Richmond-Petersburg) is a region located in a central part of the state of Virginia in the United States. As of 2008, it had a population of 1,225,626, making it the 43rd largest MSA in the country. It straddles the fall line, where the Coastal Plain and the Piedmont come together on the James River at Richmond and the Appomattox River at Petersburg. The English established each as colonial ports in the 17th century.

From 2000 to 2008, the Greater Richmond metro area experienced continuous population growth, adding over 125,000 residents for an increase of over 11 percent.[1].

Richmond, VA MSA is a U.S. Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) in Virginia as defined by the United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB) as of June 2003. Currently the area covered by the MSA coincides precisely with the Richmond-Petersburg region of Virginia.

Contents

Political subdivisions and communities

Independent cities

Since a state constitutional change in 1871, all cities in Virginia are independent cities and they are not legally located in any county. The OMB considers these independent cities to be county-equivalents for the purpose of defining MSAs in Virginia. Each MSA is listed by its counties, then cities, each in alphabetical order, and not by size.

The area is composed of four independent cities (listed in order of population):

The three smaller cities (Petersburg, Hopewell, and Colonial Heights) are located near each other in an area south of Richmond and are known collectively as the "tri-cities".

Counties

Additional counties (cities) within Metropolitan Statistical Area

These counties (cities) are parts of the Richmond, MSA dictated by the OMB.

Incorporated towns

Selected unincorporated towns and communities

The Richmond-Petersburg metropolitan area includes many unincorporated towns and communities.

Note: This is only a partial listing.

Population

Greater Richmond
Population by year[2]
1990 865,640
2000 1,100,121
2001 1,111,088
2002 1,124,822
2003 1,139,092
2004 1,154,589
2005 1,173,410
2006 1,194,008
2007 1,212,977
2008 1,225,626

The Richmond Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) which includes 3 other cities (Petersburg, Hopewell and Colonial Heights), and adjacent counties is home to approximately 1.2 million Virginians[1]).

The region is located approximately equidistant from Northern Virginia, Hampton Roads, and Lynchburg. The area is home to the state's center of gravity of population—which, in 1980, was located thirty miles west of Richmond near the Powhatan-Goochland County border.

Transportation

Advertisements

Expressways and Interstate highways

Several of the most heavily traveled highways in the state transverse the area, which includes the junctions of Interstate 64 (which runs east-west), and Interstate Highways 85 and 95 (which run north-south). The area is also served by a comprehensive network of Interstate bypasses and spurs, and several non-interstate expressways. Several of these local roads are funded by tolls, although tolls have long been removed from the area's first limited access highway, the Richmond-Petersburg Turnpike, which opened in 1958, and now forms a portion of I-95 and I-85. I-295 opened in 1992, was the last segment of Virginia's interstate system and forms an eastern bypass of Richmond and Petersburg.

Railway network

The Richmond-Petersburg region is also located along several major rail lines operated by CSX Transportation and the Norfolk Southern Railway.

The area has two passenger stations served by Amtrak.

  • Main Street Station (station code RVM), located in downtown Richmond
  • Staples Mill Road Station (station code RVR), located in Henrico County

The Department of Rail and Public Transportation of the State of Virginia has studies underway for extending high speed passenger rail service to the Virginia Peninsula and South Hampton Roads areas with a rail connection at Richmond to service along both the Northeast Corridor and the Southeast High Speed Rail Corridor. [1].

Another project, known as Transdominion Express, would extend from Richmond west to Lynchburg and from Washington, DC (Alexandria) south via an existing Virginia Railway Express route to Manassas, extending on south to Charlottesville, Lynchburg, Roanoke and Bristol on the Tennessee border. [2]

Sea and airport facilities

An international deepwater terminal is located at the Port of Richmond [3] on the James River which is navigable for shipping to Hampton Roads, the Chesapeake Bay, and the Atlantic Ocean.

Richmond International Airport is located in Henrico County, five miles east of the city center. The airport serves primarily domestic destinations in the Midwest, South, and Northeast as well as Eastern Canada.

Politics

Presidential election results
Year GOP DEM Others
2008 46.5% 291,304 52.8% 330,528 0.7% 4,369
2004 55.0% 287,810 44.4% 232,240 0.6% 3,239
2000 54.4% 239,734 43.1% 189,867 2.6% 11,269
1996 50.6% 200,687 42.4% 168,190 6.9% 27,387
1992 44.9% 184,241 40.0% 164,116 15.0% 61,538
1988 62.4% 224,861 36.7% 132,277 0.9% 3,406
1984 64.1% 231,956 35.4% 128,044 0.5% 1,792
1980 55.9% 178,936 39.5% 126,245 4.6% 14,797
1976 53.8% 155,979 44.1% 127,693 2.1% 6,044
1972 70.5% 176,154 27.8% 69,598 1.7% 4,185
1968 46.5% 109,988 30.8% 72,876 22.7% 53,648
1964 55.1% 103,295 44.9% 84,184 0.1% 144
1960 58.4% 75,523 40.9% 52,945 0.7% 905

Economy

The applicable Metropolitan Statistical Area for the Richmond-Petersburg region is the Richmond, VA MSA, which as of 2006 is identical to the region defined in this article. The Richmond MSA provides employment for a total of approximately 472,000 workers. In order of the number of workers, the major employment categories of the region are services; retail trade; manufacturing; state government; finance, insurance and real estate; local government; construction; wholesale trade; transportation and public utilities and federal government. Within the manufacturing category of some 63,700 employees, the largest category of workers is in the tobacco industry. Other important manufacturing categories are chemicals, printing and publishing, paper, and wood manufactures.

This economic diversity, which is typical of the entire Richmond-Petersburg region, helps to insulate it from hardship due to economic fluctuation in particular sectors of the economy. The region's central location also allows it to benefit from growth in other regions of Virginia and the state as a whole.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Estimates of Population Change for Metropolitan Statistical Areas and Rankings: July 1, 2007 to July 1, 2008
  2. ^ Annual Estimates of the Population of Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas
  3. ^ Port of Richmond

Template:Seealso

The Greater Richmond Region (also known as Richmond-Petersburg) is a region located in a central part of the state of Virginia in the United States. As of 2008, it had a population of 1,225,626, making it the 43rd largest MSA in the country. It straddles the fall line, where the Coastal Plain and the Piedmont come together on the James River at Richmond and the Appomattox River at Petersburg. The English established each as colonial ports in the 17th century.

From 2000 to 2008, the Greater Richmond metro area experienced continuous population growth, adding over 125,000 residents for an increase of over 11 percent.[1].

Richmond, VA MSA is a U.S. Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) in Virginia as defined by the United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB) as of June 2003. Currently the area covered by the MSA coincides precisely with the Richmond-Petersburg region of Virginia.

Contents

Political subdivisions and communities

Independent cities

Since a state constitutional change in 1871, all cities in Virginia are independent cities and they are not legally located in any county. The OMB considers these independent cities to be county-equivalents for the purpose of defining MSAs in Virginia. Each MSA is listed by its counties, then cities, each in alphabetical order, and not by size.

The area is composed of four independent cities (listed in order of population):

The three smaller cities (Petersburg, Hopewell, and Colonial Heights) are located near each other in an area south of Richmond and are known collectively as the "tri-cities".

Counties

Additional counties (cities) within Metropolitan Statistical Area

These counties (cities) are parts of the Richmond, MSA dictated by the OMB.

Incorporated towns

Selected unincorporated towns and communities

The Richmond-Petersburg metropolitan area includes many unincorporated towns and communities.

Note: This is only a partial listing.

Population

Greater Richmond
Population by year[2]
1990 865,640
2000 1,100,121
2001 1,111,088
2002 1,124,822
2003 1,139,092
2004 1,154,589
2005 1,173,410
2006 1,194,008
2007 1,212,977
2008 1,225,626

The Richmond Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) which includes 3 other cities (Petersburg, Hopewell and Colonial Heights), and adjacent counties is home to approximately 1.2 million Virginians[3]).

The region is located approximately equidistant from Northern Virginia, Hampton Roads, and Lynchburg. The area is home to the state's center of gravity of population—which, in 1980, was located thirty miles west of Richmond near the Powhatan-Goochland County border.

Transportation

Template:Seealso

Expressways and Interstate highways

Several of the most heavily traveled highways in the state transverse the area, which includes the junctions of Interstate 64 (which runs east-west), and Interstate Highways 85 and 95 (which run north-south). The area is also served by a comprehensive network of Interstate bypasses and spurs, and several non-interstate expressways. Several of these local roads are funded by tolls, although tolls have long-been been removed from the area's first limited access highway, the Richmond-Petersburg Turnpike, which opened in 1958, and now forms a portion of I-95 and I-85. I-295 opened in 1992, was the last segment of Virginia's interstate system and forms an eastern bypass of Richmond and Petersburg.

Railway network

The Richmond-Petersburg region is also located along several major rail lines operated by CSX Transportation and the Norfolk Southern Railway.

The area has three passenger stations served by Amtrak. The Department of Rail and Public Transportation of the State of Virginia has studies underway for extending high speed passenger rail service to the Virginia Peninsula and South Hampton Roads areas with a rail connection at Richmond to service along both the Northeast Corridor and the Southeast High Speed Rail Corridor. [1].

Another project, known as Transdominion Express, would extend from Richmond west to Lynchburg and from Washington, DC (Alexandria) south via an existing Virginia Railway Express route to Manassas, extending on south to Charlottesville, Lynchburg, Roanoke and Bristol on the Tennessee border. [2]

Sea and airport facilities

An international deepwater terminal is located at the Port of Richmond on the James River which is navigable for shipping to Hampton Roads, the Chesapeake Bay, and the Atlantic Ocean.

Richmond International Airport is located in Henrico County, five miles east of the city center. The airport serves primarily domestic destinations in the Midwest, South, and Northeast as well as Eastern Canada.

Politics

Presidential election results
Year GOP DEM Others
2008 46.5% 291,304 52.8% 330,528 0.7% 4,369
2004 55.0% 287,810 44.4% 232,240 0.6% 3,239
2000 54.4% 239,734 43.1% 189,867 2.6% 11,269
1996 50.6% 200,687 42.4% 168,190 6.9% 27,387
1992 44.9% 184,241 40.0% 164,116 15.0% 61,538
1988 62.4% 224,861 36.7% 132,277 0.9% 3,406
1984 64.1% 231,956 35.4% 128,044 0.5% 1,792
1980 55.9% 178,936 39.5% 126,245 4.6% 14,797
1976 53.8% 155,979 44.1% 127,693 2.1% 6,044
1972 70.5% 176,154 27.8% 69,598 1.7% 4,185
1968 46.5% 109,988 30.8% 72,876 22.7% 53,648
1964 55.1% 103,295 44.9% 84,184 0.1% 144
1960 58.4% 75,523 40.9% 52,945 0.7% 905

Economy

The applicable Metropolitan Statistical Area for the Richmond-Petersburg region is the Richmond, VA MSA, which as of 2006 is identical to the region defined in this article. The Richmond MSA provides employment for a total of approximately 472,000 workers. In order of the number of workers, the major employment categories of the region are services; retail trade; manufacturing; state government; finance, insurance and real estate; local government; construction; wholesale trade; transportation and public utilities and federal government. Within the manufacturing category of some 63,700 employees, the largest category of workers is in the tobacco industry. Other important manufacturing categories are chemicals, printing and publishing, paper, and wood manufactures.

This economic diversity, which is typical of the entire Richmond-Petersburg region, helps to insulate it from hardship due to economic fluctuation in particular sectors of the economy. The region's central location also allows it to benefit from growth in other regions of Virginia and the state as a whole.

See also

  • List of U.S. Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSA) in Virginia

References

  1. Estimates of Population Change for Metropolitan Statistical Areas and Rankings: July 1, 2007 to July 1, 2008
  2. Annual Estimates of the Population of Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas
  3. Estimates of Population Change for Metropolitan Statistical Areas and Rankings: July 1, 2007 to July 1, 2008

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message