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Janitorial workers exercising their right to protest in front of the MTV building in Santa Monica, California.

The right to protest is a perceived human right arising out of a number of recognized human rights. The right to freedom of assembly can include the right to protest. No human rights instrument or national constitution grants the absolute right to protest. However, protest may be a manifestation of the right to freedom of assembly, the right to freedom of association, and the right to freedom of speech.[1]

Freedom of assembly, the right to freedom of association, and the right to freedom of speech are commonly subject to limitations, for example, the European Convention on Human Rights only grants the right to "peaceful assembly" (Article 11), the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights allows the restriction of the freedom to assembly if it is necessary "in a democratic society in the interests of national security or public safety, public order, the protection of public health or morals or the protection of the rights and freedoms of others." (Article 11)

Protesting, however, is not necessarily violent or a threat to the interests of national security or public safety.

See also

References

  1. ^ http://www.yourrights.org.uk/your-rights/chapters/the-right-of-peaceful-protest/the-historic-right-of-peaceful-protest/the-historic-right-of-peaceful-protest.shtml
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