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In 2003, Robbie Conal targeted celebrity California governor Arnold Schwarzenegger, who had been accused of having Nazi sympathies.

Robbie Conal (born 1944) is an American guerilla poster artist noted for his gnarled, grotesque depictions of U.S. political figures of note. A former hippie, he is noted for distributing his poster art throughout a city overnight using his "volunteer guerrilla postering army".[1]

Conal's parents were both union organizers, and he grew up in Manhattan. He "graduated" in arts from San Francisco State University in 1969, although he was two credits short of a degree.[1] After living briefly in Canada he obtained a MFA from Stanford University in 1978, and moved to the Los Angeles area in 1984,[1] where he currently resides. Conal is an Adjunct Professor of Painting & Drawing at the University of Southern California's Roski School of Fine Arts.

Conal's work has been featured in numerous publications, including Time, Newsweek, the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, as well as CBS's This Morning and Charlie Rose. He was the subject of the 1992 documentary Post No Bills directed by filmmaker Clay Walker. He has also written two books, Art Attack: The Midnight Politics Of A Guerrilla Artist and Artburn, a collection of his work published in the alternative newspaper L.A. Weekly. He has been awarded grants by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Getty Trust.

In 2004, Conal joined artists Shepard Fairey and Mear One to create a series of "anti-war, anti-Bush" posters for a street art campaign called "Be the Revolution" for the art collective Post Gen.

Conal was also one of the 112 members at the "Table of Free Voices" event in Berlin.

One of Conal's posters is prominently displayed in a scene in the 1999 film The Insider.

References

  1. ^ a b c Jeff Penalty and Simon Steinhardt, Robbie Conal, Swindle magazine.

External links

See also

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