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Robinson Canó

New York Yankees — No. 24
Second baseman
Born: October 22, 1982 (1982-10-22) (age 27)
San Pedro de Macorís, Dominican Republic
Bats: Left Throws: Right 
MLB debut
May 3, 2005 for the New York Yankees
Career statistics
(through 2009)
Batting average     .306
Home runs     87
Hits     875
Runs batted in     394
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Robinson José Canó (Spanish pronunciation: [kaˈno]; born October 22, 1982, in San Pedro de Macorís, Dominican Republic) is a Dominican baseball player who currently plays as second baseman for the New York Yankees.

He was named after baseball legend Jackie Robinson.[1]

Contents

Family & early life

His father, José Canó, was signed by the Astros in 1980, and played in the major leagues in 1989, pitching in 6 games for the Houston Astros.[2]

Robinson Canó, who was named after Jackie Robinson by his father, grew up in the Dominican Republic, where he played both baseball and basketball at San Pedro Apostol High School in San Pedro de Macoris.[2] In the Dominican Winter Baseball League he plays for his hometown team Estrellas Orientales.

Robinson also spoke excellent English, the result of three years living in New Jersey. He spent seventh, eighth and ninth grades in the Newark school system, attending Barringer High for one year. Robinson went to the Pedro Apostol School in San Pedro when the family moved back to the Dominican Republic. There he was the star of the school’s baseball and basketball teams.[3]

After graduating, he was signed by the Yankees in 2001 as an amateur free agent and began playing in their minor league system. Robinson Cano made his major league debut May 3, 2005.[4]

Playing career

2005

Canó was called up to the Major Leagues on May 3, 2005, while hitting .333 in 108 at bats in AAA, and took over second base from Tony Womack. He hit .297 with 14 home runs, 62 RBI, with 34 doubles, and finished second in American League Rookie of the Year balloting to Huston Street of the Oakland Athletics.[2]

Canó finished the year, however, with the 3rd-worst walk percentage in the league, 3.0%.[5]

During 2005, manager Joe Torre took some heat for comparing Canó to Hall of Famer Rod Carew. When pressed, Torre clarified that he only meant that Canó "reminded" him of Carew, in terms of his build, presence at the plate, and smoothness in his swing. Torre assured the media that he did not necessarily expect Canó to become as great a player as Carew.[6]

2006

In 2006 Canó led the AL All-Star balloting at second base, but could not play after being placed on the disabled list for a strained hamstring. After his return from injury, however, on August 8, 2006, Canó led the league in batting average, doubles, and runs batted in.[citation needed] During late September 2006 Canó accumulated enough at-bats to once again qualify for the AL batting race. Canó was rewarded the AL Player of the Month award for September.[2]

Canó finished 2006 with the third best batting average in the AL (.342, just 2 points behind teammate shortstop Derek Jeter and five points behind Minnesota Twins catcher Joe Mauer), and 9th in the league in doubles (41). He also led the AL in batting average on the road (.364; 96/264) and after the 6th inning (.353; 55/156). He had the third-worst walk percentage in the league at 3.6%.[7]

Canó finished 22nd in American League MVP voting with 3 votes. Derek Jeter finished second.[8]

2007

Canó offered to give up his number 22 to Roger Clemens in the event that the Yankees signed him.[9] He has chosen to wear the number 24, which is a reversal of Jackie Robinson's number 42, which has been retired by Major League Baseball, and is currently only worn by teammate Mariano Rivera. After a slow start to the 2007 season which saw him hit a meager .249 through May 29, Cano found his stroke batting .385 in the month of July with 6 HR and 24 RBI to raise his season average to .300 by the end of the month. He finished 2007 6th in the league in games (160), 9th in triples (7), and 10th in hits (189), doubles (41), and at bats (670). He was the only batter in the top 10 in doubles in the AL in both 2006 and 2007. On January 24, 2008 Robinson Canó signed a contract extension for up to six years and $55 million dollars. In the new deal, Canó will make $28 million dollars over the next four years in the 2008 through 2011 seasons. The deal also includes options for the Yankees for the 2012 and 2013 seasons, during which Canó could earn an additional $27 million dollars[10] If the Yankees decline his contract option for the 2011 season, he will receive an additional 2 million.

2008

Canó batting for the Yankees in 2008.

Canó struggled early in the 2008 season, hitting .151 in April with just 7 RBIs. He improved later in the year, hitting .300 from May through August.

Notably, in Yankee Stadium's final season, Canó recorded the final walk off game winning hit in Yankee Stadium history by singling in the winning run in the bottom of the 9th inning in the Yankees 1–0 victory over the Orioles on September 20, 2008. In the final game at Yankee Stadium the next night (September 21, 2008), Canó recorded the final RBI in Stadium history with his sacrifice fly in the 7th inning, scoring Brett Gardner with the Stadium's final run. Canó missed only five games over the 2007 and 2008 seasons, and was one of only three Yankees to hit a home run while serving as a pinch hitter.[11]

2009

Cano played well in the 2009 season, hitting .320 with 204 hits, 25 home runs and 85 RBIs.[4] Cano ranked in the top ten among players in the American league in hits, extra base hits, total bases, at bats, doubles, batting average, runs scored, and triples.[4]It was his first year hitting over 20 HRs. His 200th hit against the Boston Red Sox to clinch the AL East Division made him and Derek Jeter the first middle infield duo in MLB history to both have 200 hits in the same season. [12] His 204 hits ranked 3rd for hits during the 2009 season. [4]Cano also played in 161 games which was the most games played by a player during the 2009 season.[4] He also hit a 3-run walk-off home run on August 28 against the White Sox. This was his first career walk-off home run.

Awards

Offensive Stats Year Age Tm Lg G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS OPS+ TB GDP HBP SH SF IBB Pos 2005 22 NYY AL 132 551 522 78 155 34 4 14 62 1 3 16 68 .297 .320 .458 .778 106 239 16 3 7 2006 23 NYY AL 122 508 482 62 165 41 1 15 78 5 2 18 54 .342 .365 .525 .890 126 253 19 2 1 2007 24 NYY AL 160 669 617 93 189 41 7 19 97 4 5 39 85 .306 .353 .488 .841 119 301 19 8 1 2008 25 NYY AL 159 634 597 70 162 35 3 14 72 2 4 26 65 .271 .305 .410 .715 86 245 18 5 1 2009 26 NYY AL 161 674 637 103 204 48 2 25 85 5 7 30 63 .320 .352 .520 .871 129 331 22 3 0 5 Seasons 734 3036 2855 406 875 199 17 87 394 17 21 129 335 .306 .339 .480 .818 113 1369 94 21 162 Game Avg. 162 670 630 90 193 44 4 19 87 4 5 28 74 .306 .339 .480 .818 113 302 21 5 2 5

Postseason Stats Year Age Tm Lg Series Opp Rslt G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS TB GDP HBP SH SF IBB 2005 22 NYY AL ALDS LAA L 5 21 19 3 5 3 0 0 5 0 1 2 4 .263 .333 .421 .754 8 0 2006 23 NYY AL ALDS DET L 4 15 15 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 .133 .133 .133 .267 2 1 2007 24 NYY AL ALDS CLE L 4 16 15 3 5 1 0 2 3 0 1 1 1 .333 .375 .800 1.175 12 2009 26 NYY AL ALDS MIN W 3 12 12 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 .167 .167 .167 .333 2 1 2009 26 NYY AL ALCS LAA W 6 29 23 4 6 1 2 0 4 0 0 4 3 .261 .414 .478 .892 11 1 2009 26 NYY AL WS PHI W 6 23 22 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 .136 .130 .136 .267 3 0 0 4 Seasons (6 Series) 28 116 106 11 23 5 2 2 14 0 2 7 15 .217 .276 .358 .634 38 4 2 0 1 1 4 ALDS 16 64 61 7 14 4 0 2 9 0 2 3 7 .230 .266 .393 .659 24 3 0 0 0 0 1 ALCS 6 29 23 4 6 1 2 0 4 0 0 4 3 .261 .414 .478 .892 11 1 2 0 0 1 1 WS 6 23 22 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 .136 .130 .136 .267 3 0 0 0 1 0

Personal life

During the MLB off season he resides between New Jersey and his hometown in Dominican Republic

See also

References

External links

Preceded by
Alfonso Soriano
American League Second Baseman Silver Slugger Award
2006
Succeeded by
Plácido Polanco
Preceded by
Travis Hafner
American League Player of the Month
September 2006
Succeeded by
Alex Rodriguez

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